Q.
In my line of work, I have gotten charged by quite a few moose, mostly in the woods, where I could get behind a tree, but I was been charged by a moose that literally ran me over because I was in 4 feet of snow and the nearest tree was 40 yards away. I had a 22 pistol and I fired a shot in the air and the moose ran away.
If she had not left and tried to trample me again, and I could not escape, would it be legal to shoot her in self-defense and salvage and of course, surrender all the meat to the state?

A.
AWT gets asked this question often. The regulation below specifies when the taking in defense of life or property is allowed and what must be done if an animal is taken "DLP". The important thing to remember is that ďall other practicable means to protect life and property are exhausted before the game is taken".
Thanks for the question. AWT

5 AAC 92.410. Taking game in defense of life or property
(a) Nothing in 5 AAC prohibits a person from taking game in defense of life or property if
(1) The necessity for the taking is not brought about by harassment or provocation of the animal, or by an unreasonable invasion of the animal's habitat;
(2) The necessity for the taking is not brought about by the improper disposal of garbage or a similar attractive nuisance; and
(3) All other practicable means to protect life and property are exhausted before the game is taken.
(b) Game taken in defense of life or property is the property of the state. A person taking game under this subsection shall immediately
(1) Salvage and surrender to the department the
(A) Hide and skull of a bear, completely removed from the carcass, and including all attached claws;
(B) Hide and skull of fur animals or furbearers;
(C) Meat and antlers or horns of ungulates;
(D) Meat of all other game not specified in (A) - (C) of this paragraph;
(2) Notify the department of the taking; and
(3) Submit to the department a completed questionnaire concerning the circumstances of taking of the game within 15 days after taking the game.
(c) As used in this section, "property" means
(1) A dwelling, permanent or temporary;
(2) An aircraft, boat, automobile, or other conveyance;
(3) A domesticated animal;
(4) Other property of substantial value necessary for the livelihood or survival of the owner.