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Thread: Good solid backstraps needed.

  1. #1
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    Default Good solid backstraps needed.

    We parked at the village gravle pit unable to take a 4 wheeler across the snow encrusted creek, having spotted a few Caribou a few miles distan, we jumped from ice to ice and threw our stuffs across to get at em.....as they were meandering with the wind and a collison course with us if we got across the creek and up that hillside.

    So heres a picture finding me and neighbor Joe walking about 2-1/2 miles up the mountain behind our village, and then we turned Left real sudden like, into the wind, another mile and we walked up on bedding caribou, the only 4 in sight, one standing , 3 down....Sweet.

    I got mine where he lay, Joe got his as it stood for a broadside


    Then Joe with his Meats


    Then , in more of a B-line, but still intersecting the Selawik/Noorvik steak trail, we head'd back down....yaaaa, all down hill from there.....about a 2 1/2 mile walk back to the ride, but quite well worth it. Should have brought a walking stick for the pack back!! nothing worse than wrenching when you lift a load out there, or try to stop yourself from falling....Tundra is baaaaaad. lucky the hides are useless and the meats skinny, great drying weather right now too...no flys yet 24 hours light, breezy but not windy....summers here, the ice went a few days ago, that was a great hunt as well.

    Joes pack busted its straps as he butcher'd down, and his pack swung its weight around.
    I let nine get stiff and balanced it by cutting off the neck. I put the neck meat in my possibles bag with the Heart and Tounge to counterbalance my rifle, and the 90 or so lbs of meats was quite easy to carry cleanly.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  2. #2
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    Once at the house the oldest daughter cleaned it while mom sharpend knifes.


    it was all over in short order




    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  3. #3
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Amazing life. Thanks.

  4. #4
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Look there is a little of that techno weanie sheep hunter in ya after all. Now your talking sticks, packs, weights, and climbing elevation. I expect a ram sometime in the near future out of you, subsistence style though. You'll have to sleep in a blue tarp just to make it authentic. Way to go bringing home the meats.

  5. #5
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Good job on the meat gathering!

  6. #6
    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    neat stuff as always stranger...

  7. #7
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    I suppose the Mosin was involved in this as well?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by knikglacier View Post
    I suppose the Mosin was involved in this as well?
    No less than the 'BEST', for sure. Mosin all the way.

    "Tecnoweiniesheephunter" eh? Oh man ~~LOL!!~~

    tehse last few I shoot Ewes, a very UN-PC 'Thang' on these boards, but delicious nonetheless. I could take a picture of horns along the side of the house with a few full curls, but there were the 90's before sheep #s were low and nothing was a happenin'. Now I can hunt and be home to sleep , same day, if I feel like eating Sheep.....My parka is sheep skin.

    The walking stick is my same old "tuuk" I use to test ice and tundra bog, pole my tent, push my boat, steady my walk with large loads and help get myself up with a large load alone, if I dont just lean on it to rest or use it for a rifle rest.
    I have travle bag in the winter, stays on my ride, in summer I have a canvas German ruksack with a light internal frame, carrys my extra cloths, sleeping stuff, a book, poncho and cook kit, maby a couple tools of sorts and grub.

    But when I am in persuit, its just my possible bag, with spare ammo, fire starters, TP, a small sharpening stone, spare knife, small first aid kit, 100 ft.550cord, 2 50lbs sack sized grain bags to carry meats and a water flask w/cup, maby some snack, very very light.
    Its easy to make a pack sack outta a bit of rope and a grain bag.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  9. #9
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Is that a Kevlar Grain bag with silicone treatment there Stranger? How about that TB....only single ply I hope. The weight of a three ply is WAY Too much man. Grin.

  10. #10
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    Na, Bighorse, they are recycled Oat bags, the TP, however, is two ply, a nice concession of comfort and needed strength in use, well worth the weight ~~LOL!!~~

    I tryed Cloth gamebags, they are nice, but too long and rather heavy. Often I use a Blue poly tarp to get under outta the rain, wrap up in as a layer, laydown on to keep off the tundra, and drag carcasses long ways across tundra, like probly should have done with the young Bull there.
    Authentic Subsistance Hunting is not mesured in suffering to get dinner, its about enjoying a happy and productive life. Theres so much to do to get to the Hunting and after the Hunting that were always getting ready.........


    We shot at about 100-120 yards and we were able to get really close with 3 of them bedded down and a young one on watch...who wont leave, and cant wake his buddies......easy pickings for the observent Hunter. The picture of "wheres the Caribou" was when we turned into the wind, and low walked together to imitate another Caribou and approach in the wide open, meandering and zigzagging like caribou do, and they paid us no mind at all ....
    The wize Hunter just shoot what they can carry on their backs and I was SO happy to see Joe (22) stop shooting after he dropped his. 'Bang','Click' on went the safety Good by, 2 Caribou
    Awsome the M-39, Czeck Light ball....
    I think you guys can see "why' I had to learn long shots on tundra..Biathalon and my parents starting me shooting at a young age makes it kind of well practised now
    If I had wanted more than one, the second would have gone a further 100 yards before stopping for the "Final Look" which it often is, and I wait for it. Those are the 'usual' long shots I do, but it depends on the day and the way.
    Shooting at Sheep is usually 300 yards more or less, the closest Ive made was 50 feet on a ram that decended to me.....
    I truely get as absolutely close as I can, but if theres distance, I wait for the animal to calm and pace itself. Often they stop when they think they are far 'enough', but I am the one with the Rifle, and command of all I see.....~~LOL!!~~
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  11. #11
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    Wow, I sure do miss hunting with you guys, I wish I had been here for the breakup. I see lots skins on your rack drying with meat, how many beaver and muskrats did you get?.
    I dropped by Joe and he filled me in that Ark your building in front of your house. Are you leaving? Sail to Anchorage? Come and stay when you get there.

    Ha Ha ha ha ha!

  12. #12
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    Hey, Ol'Man!

    Agnes said you stopped by for a couple hours last night, thanks for the Salami The 'Crack' of sausage!!!

    Th 'Scrats and Beaver are a group effort, mostly the kids getting a 1/2 dozen a day till the ice went. 5 here, 2 there, 8 there, like that.

    For break up , I was actually up river, as I headed to Kotz by plane for some Emergency Planning Committion, but Kotz fogged out and since I was the only Noorvik passenger, they landed at Kiana, so the rest just went home, and I just visited, awaiting the fog to lift ~~LOL!!~~ Bright, sunny, hot up river, but with the ice on the ocean yet and coolness blowing, Kotz was pretty bad...........So I asked for a ride home by boat over VHF, as everyone was primed and ready, I got 7 or 8 calls back, with a ride "IF" I would be the driver......the bassturds ~~LOL!!~~ the .22 in my pocket wouldnt have been any good for hunting anyway, and I would have had to watch or mooch shells if I didnt drive.
    So I caught a ride with Banjo Henry and drove him with the ice jams on back home, as you may have noticed, the water this year is the highest its been since '91, and the boat was filled fairly fast that we stopped hunting by Aksik and just went home from there
    Glad you were home, but I just dont visit around during funeral times, most people are not at their best, but Ill catch you next time.

    My best Regards, Dude!!!!


    Bighorse, I often think of the best ways to reduce weight while hunting, I can well undertand the Tecnosheepweenie...... Possessions, while Hunting, are litterally a burden
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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