Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: Up and running...First Garden...

  1. #1
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default Up and running...First Garden...

    Starting small, but so far so good!!

    Decided to just go with three 4' square boxes



    Got the slats on for spacing dividers



    Planting!! Everyone 'helping'




  2. #2
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    The baby making quick work of throwing dirt around



    I knew we needed a covering for these but didn't have the material on hand right away. Sure enough, we had visitors and had to temporarily protect our greens!!



    Went with 1/2" PVC and covered the beds with visqueen. Its also trapping a bunch of heat and our starts are thriving!




  3. #3
    Member garnede's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    soon to be back in Alaska
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    You may need to roll up the side of your visqueen when it is sunny, otherwise it could get too hot. What all did you plant?
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Great job. Kids love to plant & watch them grow.
    My first gardens, the moose found in August, they loved almost everything & can eat allot.
    Good luck. Gardening is fun & rewarding.

  5. #5
    Member power drifter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Down wind of 2 Glaciers
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    Nice to see kids playing in dirt. What could be more fun? Just as well start your fence project next. You will need it !!!!

  6. #6
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by garnede View Post
    You may need to roll up the side of your visqueen when it is sunny, otherwise it could get too hot. What all did you plant?
    How hot is too hot? I might need to get a thermometer for each one and do as you suggest during those scorchers...

    Lettuce
    Zucchini
    Purple potatoes
    Radish seeds
    Carrots
    Snap peas
    tomatoes
    I'm sure a few more that I can't remember...

  7. #7
    Member power drifter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Down wind of 2 Glaciers
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    Not sure I'm understanding what it is your doing? Are you just covering these up at night or keeping them covered? Lettuce is a plant that likes it cooler and can go down to mild freeze temp. The only thing you have listed that wants it warmer is tomato.Most tomatoes like to be 70 -80 all the time. Green house is the way for tomatoes. The rest of your things I wouldn't cover them. A cover like that will work nice if there was a chance of frost, but we should be good to go now.

  8. #8
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Mainly for the moose because they're in the yard about 4 days a week on average. I guess I could roll it up during the day and let 'em breathe.

    The wife did say the lettuce was already over twice the size it was when we started. I guess I kinda assumed I was killing two birds with one stone, so to speak, with protecting from the munchers and getting it a few degrees warmer. Thanks for the advice to the rookie!

  9. #9
    Member power drifter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Down wind of 2 Glaciers
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    Under your photos you say covered in visgueen, but it looks like blue/silver tarps? Clear visgueen would get to hot under it on these warm sunny days. That silver tarp might be reflecting enough to some what stay cooler under it, but light and sun are very important to plants.
    Not sure what to say about the moose. Once they find the garden not sure a tarp will slow them down. Over the years I got so mad I finally had to do the fence to get anything in the fall. 8 ft high works great!! Good luck !

  10. #10
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Those are great looking raised beds. the kids will get a thrill out of watching things sprout and grow.... but I gotta tell you, so will the moose... The Only thing I can remember the moose ever left completely alone in my gardens was onions and garlic... I thought my 6ft fence would keep them out of the yard/garden, but one morning this past spring the Alsation was going crazy barking and when I looked, my 3 apple trees had been drastically pruned, and the moose left the usual pile of marbles ... I don't know if that was to show their appreciation for the tasty spring morsles, or to show their complete disrespect...!!!

  11. #11
    Member garnede's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    soon to be back in Alaska
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    The zucchini and tomato like heat up to 90-100 during the day and 60-70 at night. All of the rest like normal Alaska summer. You might consider chicken wire or some sort of other wire that will let light in and heat out for the cool weather vegies. Be careful with plastic it can reach 140+ even in alaska inside a plastic enclosure.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  12. #12
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Everything but the tomatoes do well here outside. My zuc plants each take up about a 4' circle for area, do great outside in the garden & are the most sensitive to frost in Sept.
    Hot days: give everything a drink in the morning or if you see it begin to wilt; right away.
    Planting around birch trees, you may have to water allot. Birch suck up all the surface ground water.

    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    How hot is too hot? I might need to get a thermometer for each one and do as you suggest during those scorchers...

    Lettuce
    Zucchini
    Purple potatoes
    Radish seeds
    Carrots
    Snap peas
    tomatoes
    I'm sure a few more that I can't remember...

  13. #13
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by power drifter View Post
    Under your photos you say covered in visgueen, but it looks like blue/silver tarps? Clear visgueen would get to hot under it on these warm sunny days. That silver tarp might be reflecting enough to some what stay cooler under it, but light and sun are very important to plants.
    Not sure what to say about the moose. Once they find the garden not sure a tarp will slow them down. Over the years I got so mad I finally had to do the fence to get anything in the fall. 8 ft high works great!! Good luck !
    The tarp was there just to cover the plants while the moose were around right after planting (before I had the PVC piping and visqueen).

    If I keep the plants mostly covered but with the visqueen rolled up to let the beds 'breathe', will it deter the moose at all? I am under the assumption that if they don't know its there, the might leave it alone.

    Covering them at night OK? Would the pull the plastic off to investigate what's under there?

  14. #14
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    I think something like this might have to happen. Completely enclose the plants....


  15. #15
    Member power drifter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Down wind of 2 Glaciers
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    The funny thing with moose and gardens it kind of depends if the ones around you have gotten the taste.
    I have friends that say they have a garden at their cabin they fly out to. Out there the moose never touch their garden as there aren't lots of gardens to sample along their walk. Here in the valley its from one garden to another. I have had cows bring caves show them where to come then they do the same for their young. I Like lots of flowers as well and they will eat tulips but they never touch Lilies.As a gardener one can learn to HATE moose. The nice thing with fences besides keeping them out is you have your place for peas and beans to climb already in place. 8 ft high does kind of start looking like a prison if you not careful. Its all fun!

  16. #16
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,393

    Default

    What about a simple electric fence? I was thinking of putting one of those battery-operated bear fences around my garden. We didn't have any problems with moose last year, but I imagine it's only a matter of time.

  17. #17
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by power drifter View Post
    The funny thing with moose and gardens it kind of depends if the ones around you have gotten the taste.
    I have friends that say they have a garden at their cabin they fly out to. Out there the moose never touch their garden as there aren't lots of gardens to sample along their walk. Here in the valley its from one garden to another. I have had cows bring caves show them where to come then they do the same for their young. I Like lots of flowers as well and they will eat tulips but they never touch Lilies.As a gardener one can learn to HATE moose. The nice thing with fences besides keeping them out is you have your place for peas and beans to climb already in place. 8 ft high does kind of start looking like a prison if you not careful. Its all fun!
    I agree whole heartedly with Power Drifter... it seems that once a cow gets your garden location imprinted in her tiny brain, they will keep returning as long as they live, and they bring their calves, which starts another cycle... For several years we struggled without the fence.. the cows only showed up in mid to late August - they'd do all their damage in one nights feeding, and then you'd rarely see them again until after snowfall, and then they might show up to see if they had overlooked a cabbage, or small piece of broccoli....

  18. #18

    Default

    Brian, The electric works well and it does not look like a fort with big fences. Go with the type that you use regular electricty then you do not have to keep a battery charged. You will want to run two strands of wire ,one low that will get the smaller calves and one taller that old moma moose will put her nose on and then away she will be going. They make a ribbon like material that has wire woven in ,it is a lot easier to see and less likley you would walk into it .Good Luck

  19. #19
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    What about a simple electric fence? I was thinking of putting one of those battery-operated bear fences around my garden. We didn't have any problems with moose last year, but I imagine it's only a matter of time.

    Brian, I'm not sure we could keep our kids from exploring the electric fence. We did talk about that though.

  20. #20
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Looks like its rockin' and rollin'

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •