Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Grayling & Powerline Boats

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    14

    Default Grayling & Powerline Boats

    Hi all,
    New to the recent Jet boat scene. Last one I ran was an ancient 20' Wooly w/302 in 1990, and I only had it for a year and never got to really "use it".
    While looking for boats I have contemplated the Grayling and Powerlines. Can anyone tell me?
    - how these handled
    - how much flotation was calculated for the double floor
    - how they hold up
    I 'm am not adverse to repowering a good hull. In fact it may let me get what I want with just a few mods. These appear to be very good solid workhorses for this environment.
    Looking for good river performance in the 20-22' range, so I can take it on some moderate interior river hunting trips with occassional trips to PWS (while picking my weather days).

    Thanks,
    Vsquared

  2. #2
    Member Jimw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    452

    Default

    Give them a call.....

    http://www.reynoldsmarine.biz/

    2005 20' Weldcraft Sabre XL 350 MP
    SD309 AT
    2009 Polaris Dragon 800 163
    Custom Mod's

  3. #3

    Default

    Vsquared, just might have a line on a 22' Powerline that might be what you are looking for. PM me.

  4. #4

    Default

    Our first boat was a 19' Grayling. We liked it so much we bought another when we upgraded to a 30'er. Both are exceptional boats and I can't say enough good things about them. They are strong, well layed out, and designed for Alaska.

    1. how these handled
    Our current boat (30') is very predictable and handles superb in rough seas. We got caught in 10' cappers one morning coming out of Driftwood bay. The seas didn't even phase the boat taking them at 45 degrees either head on or in following seas. Her captain didn't like it, though. However, being aluminum it seems like we get bounced around more than a glass boat.

    We ran rivers mostly in the old boat and made a bunch of trips up the Yentna with out any issues. I also made a trip way up the Kantishna river and had no issues. Being a heavier boat it seems to draft a bit more than a Wolly or Extreme, so you'll need to pay attention to the channel.

    2. how much flotation was calculated for the double floor
    I don't know the answer to this question, but the boat drafts such that fish holds and blackwater tank do not overflow at rest and are self draining while on step. One time in our old boat we were overloaded and the fish hold overflowed onto the deck. All that happended is that water ran from the hold and out the scuppers. Gotta love a self-bailing deck.

    3. how they hold up
    We have had no problems with either boat and they wear well. Me being tight with a buck I didn't hesitate to repower last spring. The hull is stamped 1992 and I see no signs of significant wear on the hull.

    When Grayling went under in the early 90's, they started making boats under the Peregrine name. There is a big one on CL right now, though pricey. If I were to upgrade to a bigger boat, I would probably make a run at that one...need to convince the wife, though.

    Here is a pic of our current boat.

    Attachment 49340

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimw View Post
    Give them a call.....

    http://www.reynoldsmarine.biz/
    Thanks! I want to have a stbd new depth sounder bracket welded on mine and couldn't find a welder I get the warm and fuzzies from. Though GC says they do mods, I've never gotten them to return my phone calls.

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    14

    Default

    MischeifManaged,
    Thanks much. Any other user please chime in also.
    As I am comparing them to my limited knowlede of old Woolys, and few rides in a newer Alaskan can you tell me how they track compared to the Wooldridges? Do you recall what your deadrise was in the riverboat?
    Also, is the extra weight and draft from the internal structure as they don't look fundamentally heavier as AL decking and 3/4MP are pretty comparable weight wise.

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Talkeetna kid,
    I am still having problems with this site and can't send PMs. Seems my email filter always grabs it and I can never get it - no matter how many messages I've sent to admin.
    You can email me at jvandervalk@muni.org

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vsquared View Post
    MischeifManaged,
    Thanks much. Any other user please chime in also.
    As I am comparing them to my limited knowlede of old Woolys, and few rides in a newer Alaskan can you tell me how they track compared to the Wooldridges? Do you recall what your deadrise was in the riverboat?
    Also, is the extra weight and draft from the internal structure as they don't look fundamentally heavier as AL decking and 3/4MP are pretty comparable weight wise.
    I have no direct experience with Wollys so I cant draw any comparisons. The deadrise at the stern was about ten percent. The boat was heavy and was a real pain to get unstuck. Hence, the need to pay close attention to the channel. Neither boat skid in tight turns nor do they chine walk at high speeds.

  9. #9

    Default

    Vsquared, message sent to the email address you provided.

  10. #10

    Default

    I almost hit a log this weekend, which reminded me of the time I hit one with the old river boat on the Skwentna River. It was partially submerged and it struck with such force that the boat jumped out of the water. I immediately tied off on the nearest bank, evacuated the boat, and waited for it to sink. Nothing happened.

    When I got the boat back on the trailer I couldn't find so much as a scratch on the hull. It is an exceptionally tough boat.

  11. #11

    Default

    Both boats are virtually the same, Bruce Powers worked for Jeff Johnson at Grayling and learned how to weld and fabricate in his shop prior to venturing out on his own. I have three friends that had boats built by Bruce and all of them were and are tanks that will hold up for 50 years. I have always loved the Graylings and Powerlines ... nice alaskan boat without all the paint and flash and built for the long haul.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •