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Thread: Weeds

  1. #1

    Default Weeds

    So we just got our plants in the beds and got a load of garden soil from Susitna Organics. Only thing is, there are already TONS of little weeds sprouts coming up. Should we put mulch on top of the soil now that the plants are in the ground or is there a better way to control the weeds? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Mulch now and if you see weeds pushing thru the mulch add more. If the plants are too small you can mulch deeply between and lightly around the plants. Weeds are much easier to keep under control if you mulch early and often. The mulch will slowly break down and feed your soil and plants too.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Thanks! That is what I was thinking.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    What is the ideal mulch for a veggie garden? Our weeds weren't out of control last year (our first), but it would be nice to do it right.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    What is the ideal mulch for a veggie garden? Our weeds weren't out of control last year (our first), but it would be nice to do it right.
    The best is wheat straw, but anything organic works. See if the library has "Gardening Without Work" or "How to Have a Green Thumb, Without an Aching Back" by Ruth Stout. Or Lasagna Gardening by Patricia Lanza. Leaves, grass clippings, straw, hay, wood chips, pine bark, algae, seaweed, etc. will all work as garden mulch. The seaweed and anything else from in or near the sea are good sources for trace minerals that are often absent in some quantity in all soils. Rock dust or pulverized granite also make good soil amendments for trace elements.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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