Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28

Thread: Lee Loader?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    520

    Default Lee Loader?

    I know the serious handloaders will laugh at this, but has anyone tried one of those little Lee Loaders, the kind that you seat the bullet and primer with a hammer?

    I reloaded a few hundred rounds of .308 and .300 Win with one of those in my teenage years with good results.

    Do they still make Lee Loaders? I thought it might be an option for .45 Colt for reducing the price of target practice. Any opinions? Thanks....Louis

  2. #2
    Member RainGull's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    The S.E. of the N.W.
    Posts
    950

    Default

    Nothing not serious about it. Check midway, they have some nice dies of the type you are referring.

  3. #3

    Default Lee Loaders

    Haven't used one in years, but they are still available. There are benchrest shooters who use a likeness of this item made by Wilson. Most benchrest shooters will only use 20 or less pieces of brass in a 2 or 3 day match though. They reload between relays.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    296

    Default

    I reloaded hundreds of .357 Mag with one of the Lee Loaders while living in the barracks at Camp Lejuene. Always had to stash the powder, etc. elsewhere for inspections though! The Lee does a good job if your patient.
    The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps! (Eleanor Roosevelt, 1945)

  5. #5

    Default

    I stuck the bolt on my 300 wby with one of those......ok for the slowest powder......as long as I am not shooting it

    if you want one for 270win or 300wby.....I can help you

  6. #6
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,292

    Default just seen online at cabelas

    it was like $14. had the whole kit for the anniversary for $69. press and everything but dies. am thinking about it but not sure if i am that commited to my 44mag. cheap though.

  7. #7

    Default

    I began reloading with one of these in .44 Magnum way back in the 70's. They work, but will get your attention real fast if you seat a primer a little too forcefully with the hammer.... Did it and went to a bench press..... Nothing at all wrong with them IF you go slow and follow instructions at all times.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  8. #8

    Default Lee Loader

    This rudimentary reloading system is for when you have no other way to reload, financially or locationwise, as when you live remote. They are only good for neck sizing rifle cases and when using stick powder, even some of the shorter stuff, you can be off 2 to 2.5 grains high or low, so you can actually be off 4 to 5 grains between loads. So, if you can afford even the most basic single stage press, scale, powder measure, etc. I suggest you do so.

  9. #9

    Default

    I had decent luck with the sizing, decapping, priming and seating. I would however take that scoop and loose it in the box your powder scale comes in. a scoop is not uniform enough at all.......can be down right dangerous

  10. #10

    Default

    I still use a Lee Loader for certain applications and like them within their limitations. They are best when used for short straight pistol cases. Good for a kid to learn on without much investment. "Mexican Match" is one of my uses. I believe the choice in cartridges has been cut back quite a bit, but can probably find what you need at a gun show, etc. Lee may even make a custom one for you? They are only practical for loading about 20 rounds at a time, which may be good enough for a lot of people. Be careful using the load data from an old one-compare it to a recent reloading manual and adjust as needed.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default Lee Loaders & hammer

    I had one of those for my .357 way back in the early to mid 60s when I was in high school and college. Also had one in .22 Hornet for my $35 Win. Mdl 43 rifle. Loaded many rounds with the .357 thru college; I tradrd off the .22 Hornet and loading stuff on a motorcycle when I was a senior in high school.

    I also had one in 12 ga. for my Dad's old single shot clunker. I think I still have it somewhere in the garage.

    They do work but a better option is to shop the gun shows for used dies and presses etc. A scale is almost a must whatever you use - the powder measures are workable if your are carefully but severely limit your options as to powders and bullet weights.

    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    I know the serious handloaders will laugh at this, but has anyone tried one of those little Lee Loaders, the kind that you seat the bullet and primer with a hammer?

    I reloaded a few hundred rounds of .308 and .300 Win with one of those in my teenage years with good results.

    Do they still make Lee Loaders? I thought it might be an option for .45 Colt for reducing the price of target practice. Any opinions? Thanks....Louis
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    idaho
    Posts
    591

    Default

    I also have a Lee loader. Must be a .308 or .270. Bought in the '60's.
    Anybody that wants it can have it.
    If I remember it work OK.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,813

    Default They're sorta primative, but quite useful, IMO.

    The problem is, they don't make them in very many cartridges anymore.

    You can only neck size, but that should work OK for a while. (The neck is sized down, just enough to hold the bullet, rather than being sized more, then expanded to hold the bullet, like conventional dies.)

    The powder dipper will work fine, providing you use a ball powder, that measures well, and it holds a satisfactory charge of the powder you're using.

    They serve their purpose, which is cheap handloading and portability. You won't need a lot of accessories, maybe just a hammer. Something to measure case length, and a file??? with a pocket knife to chamfer if you trim.

    You can take it to the range and do it all, right there.

    I had one in 357, and it was a natural choice for me, because at the time, my rifle loading was done with the Lyman 3 Tong 10 tools.

    I sold it, but I've regretted it ever since, because I still have the plastic hammer I used with it to remind me.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    idaho
    Posts
    591

    Default

    I went out to the shop and dug out my old Lee loader just to see what I had.
    It's a 30/06 "target Model". Along with the standard stuff it has a case trimmer, debur tool,
    primer pocket reamer, neck reamer, and a hand primer tool.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Missouri
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Until now the LEE LOADER was all I used to reload in 45ACP, 9mm, .308w, 30-06, & 30-30. Most of the kits I have are the older ones (1970s). The only one I needed & did not buy (seller asking WAY TOO MUCH!) is 7.7mm jap. I even have LEE LOADS-ALLs to reload 12ga & 20ga
    I recently purchased some full size dies for alot of what I reload. Have not given them a try yet.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    stuck at 7500' in CO for now
    Posts
    50

    Default Good stuff for what it is.

    I have one for every cartridge that I have that they make one for. I have used some of them in the past for various reasons. My first reloading experience was with a 20 gauge Lee Loader. That was many moons ago. Now I collect them for a different reason. With a Lee loader of the correct cartridge, a Lee hand priming tool, a RCBS beam scale, bullets, powder, primers, & brass in a small box or bag if the s hits the fan one can reload anywhere the scale can be set up. Something I hope I don't have to use but would not be without. They also work at the range for a couple of rounds to try something new. The problem at the range is the scales tend to weigh too much wind & not enough powder. The little scoops look real nice in the box. Not accurate for heavy loads although I have a couple that have been modified for a specific powder charge using the same powder at less than max load. Lee also makes a hand operated "press" that uses regular dies. Haven't tried one yet. It would be quieter than the old style tap with a hammer ones.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    505

    Default Don't use a hammer

    Use a mallet (Wood, plastic, hard rubber or rawhide or sume such material). A metal hammer will tend to peen the tool over time and is harder (in my opinion) to regulate the strength of the blows.

    I also recommend having a piece of wood to rest the tool on so whatever you are using as a work surface does not develop a huge, shallow dent.

    Very slow to use, but if it is all you can get, it works.

    Yes, Lee Precision is still making them.

    Lost Sheep.

  18. #18

    Default

    My reloading system is the Lee hand loader, with two dies for de-priming/sizing and bullet loading. So far, I've been able to size the necks of my .375 Ruger shells, but only after using muscle, and I'm looking at the need to fully resize if I want to reload economically. Thus it seems I would reluctantly agree, that the bigger press is a better idea.

  19. #19

    Default

    Started reloading with a Lee Loader in 7X57 Mauser about 40 years ago. Still use them occasionally. Since the patents are close to running out there is a lot of talk about them quiting making them. They can be had on ebay but sometimes get expensive. Would you believe there are actually people collecting them?
    If space is tight, there is always the option of the Lee Hand Press with regular dies. Plus a scale if you don't like the dipper system and a cartridge block. Whole setup can fit into a small tool box.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Missouri
    Posts
    265

    Default

    I have LEE LOADERs for the following calibers: 308, 30-06, 30-30, 45acp, & 9mm. I also use the LOADS-ALL for 12ga & 20ga.
    Yes they are slow, but they get the job done.

    Now if I could find one for my 7.7mm Arisaka, I would have one for each caliber I own.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •