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Thread: Started planting the garden

  1. #1
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Default Started planting the garden

    Weather got to me. Hot & sunny, trees are greening up, weeds were sprouting, Purple martin showed up today, GH was getting over full with starts, must be a sign that it's time.
    Fought the raspberries out of some of the raised beds & tires. I should've had on leather gloves.
    Anyway, broc, cab, brussels spts, lettuce coliflower & seeded the peas.
    Potatoes & bean seeds tomorrow.
    Will wait on the squash, it is more sensitive. (looking for onion sets, anybody seen some?)
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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Looking good, soon your garden will pass mine with all of that light.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    You're killing me. Mine is at least a week out, probably slightly more. I'm going to start hardening off my starts tomorrow, though I might try to get my potatoes, spinach, and carrots in the ground before I leave for five days.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    I planted most of my seed's yesterday in the hot sun... I have to "harden" off the brassicas before I put them out 24/7 to get sunburned or windburned again like last year...

    I'm curious, do you rotate your crops in different boxes each year..??
    How far apart do you plant your cabbages in the boxes..?? how far apart do you plant your Broccoli..?? Brussel spts..???
    I grabbed up some white and yellow onion sets at Freddies back early in March... planting them yesterday they were looking too
    dried out.. not so sure they were worth it...
    Has anyone ever grown acorn squash with any degree of success...???

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Yea, I rotate. I made my first boxes too small/narrow for the bigger root plants so I'm limited there. But I rotate best I can.
    I'm not sure I need to since the soil shrinks & I add new compost to them every year. Maybe helps reduce bug infestations.

    I just had a thought, I could just make a new end board & make the narrow boxes wider pretty easy. "duh". "On the TO_DO_LIST" now

  6. #6
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudbuddy View Post
    Yea, I rotate. I made my first boxes too small/narrow for the bigger root plants so I'm limited there. But I rotate best I can.
    I'm not sure I need to since the soil shrinks & I add new compost to them every year. Maybe helps reduce bug infestations.

    I just had a thought, I could just make a new end board & make the narrow boxes wider pretty easy. "duh". "On the TO_DO_LIST" now
    I tried to make my new boxes about the same width as yours, but not having a tape measure when I visited you, my eye ball measurements came out a little skinny on the first two boxes... So my 2nd set of boxes are about right I think... but time will tell on that too... I wanted mine wide enough so that I could plant a double row of things like carrots or beets, or onions... but for the big root cabbages, broccoli, etc, a single row will have to do...

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    I planted the potatoes, peas, beans & carrots seeds.
    Then the wind picked up, above 35 gusts. I watched several of my starts get stripped down to one or 2 leaves.
    So much for early. Plants going to have to be tough this year. Hope enough of them left to grow.
    So I checked the weather, NOW & windy for the next 2 days. Should of done that this AM.
    I may have to go to back up plants, have a few left, but I put out the good ones.
    Might even have to buy some, teach me to plant early. We'll see.

    My 3rd year with raised beds, so I'm still learning what works for me.
    I sprinkle carrot, spinach, radishes & beets etc., seeds all around in the boxes & then pluck them for good spacing
    as they come up.
    1st year with raised beds, I did rows, (old habit) but with the boxes, I watch plant spacing & use the whole area.

    May widen one or 2 beds next spring. Small ones have uses.

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    cant wait to see how them raised beds worked out for ya, got my tomatoes in larger pots in our greenhouse, hope they make it!
    Semper Fi!

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    I lost 3 red cabbage plants to the winds - so far... snapped them off at the ground...
    I planted carrots - in rows - in one of my new raised beds, but after reading your post, I'm tempted to buy another pkg of carrot seed and sprinkle over the top of them. That definitely would be better utilization of the space...! But I think for things such as snap beans a row would still be the preferred manner...(?)

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    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    When I was a kid growing up in the mid west where the wind blows hard every day we always put something like a tin can cut open on both ends, or a wooden shingle. Later on we started to use clay tile pipe around the little plants to protect them.They worked best. It really helps and they grow fast shooting for that open top for the light. I know one couldn't find that kind of pipe/tile any more, but maybe some big plastic pipe cut to say 10-12 inches might work good. Push them into the dirt a bit so they don't blow away.Pull them off once the plants are bigger and reuse them for years.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    If you stager your plants you can fit more in less space with no loss of production. If they should be planted 12" apart, plant the first row as normal, then take a stick and cut it to 12". Make an equilateral triangle with it based from 2 plants in your first row. On wider beds this will let you plant 10-15% more plants in the same space.

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    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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