Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 38

Thread: Spiney dogfish?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    181

    Default Spiney dogfish?

    What is the bag limit in North gulf coast waters, and do you have to mark it on your liscense?

  2. #2
    Member Sierra Dragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    329

    Default

    My read is they fall in the "other finfish" catagory so no limit

    but why would you want to keep them?

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sierra Dragon View Post
    My read is they fall in the "other finfish" catagory so no limit

    but why would you want to keep them?
    I believe they fall under the shark category-limit 2 per year. Agree though, why would you want to keep them?

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    eagle river
    Posts
    24

    Default

    read the regs (pg15) spiny dogfish not included

  5. #5
    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Seward
    Posts
    1,126

    Default

    confusing to me. if there was a change frbom 2 per year to no limit, it would be nice to know. tons around this spring

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cbalzar View Post
    read the regs (pg15) spiny dogfish not included
    My mistake. Sorry folks. Better to keep my mouth shut.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    181

    Default

    Just got off the phone with ADF&g in Anchorage. They said they fall under the shark 1 per day, one in possesion. However, they are not sharks when it comes to 2 per year, and you do not have to annotate your liscense.
    Thanks for the replies.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    93

    Default

    Curiosity is getting the best of me. Why would you want to keep these? From what I understand they aren't something you would try for or have a desire to keep.

  9. #9
    Member FishGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fishing your hole before you get there
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    If you go to Britain and order fish & chips, you're eating spiny dogfish.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  10. #10
    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    um... Wasilla...
    Posts
    826

    Default

    Are you sure?

    The following is from Ask.com.

    Fish and Chips
    Deep-fried fish in a crispy batter with fat golden chips is still one of Britain and Ireland's favorite meals. The love for them ranks alongside Roast Beef and Yorkshire Puddings, and the recently nominated Chicken Tikka Masala, as the English National Dish.

    Which Fish?
    The UKís favorite fish is still Cod and accounts for 61.5% of total consumption. Although the North Sea cod stocks issue is a serious problem, Cod landed in the UK is caught within strict management regimes and quota systems setting safe limits for catches agreed by fishermen, scientists and government. Cod caught within these agreed limits is safe for consumers to eat.

    Haddock at 25% is the second favorite and regional variations include whiting in Northern Ireland and some parts of Scotland, skate and huss in the south of England.


    I see cod and haddock making up 86.5% of the fish and chips in England. And since I read it on the interweb, it must be true!
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    181

    Default

    I have no interest in fishing for these. A friend of mine, who has a boat, asked me the question. I didn't have the answer, so I asked here.
    Thanks again.

  12. #12
    Member ocnfish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    542

    Default

    saw someone trying to filet one at the docks a few years ago and they were ending up with a grey white mush .... cant be all that great ... one other point, like all sharks they have no kidney, therfore urea / amoina leaves the body by the skin and there is a lot of it in the flesh.

    not for me ...

  13. #13

    Default

    I found a book in my grandfathers closet years ago that was all about preparing spiny dogfish. It was from Britain. There was a certain way to filet them that involved a 2x4 with a nail sticking out of it, where you would impale the head. The trick with any shark is to clean it VERY quickly. Filet it and skin it within a few minutes of catching and place the meat in a bucket of water. For every gal of water put 1/2 a cup of lemon juice, this will help soak out any urea that came in contact with the meat. They are good eating. not as good a fresh salmon shark but still. good. As for the guy that was cleaning one at the dock, I have see guys cleaning salmon at the dock that I wouldn't feed my cat.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,073

    Default

    google "spiny dog fish fish and chips" and you will get all sorts of information on the English using spiny dog fish for fish and chips.

  15. #15
    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    um... Wasilla...
    Posts
    826

    Default

    Well, I'll be! Seems it's true. I also found an article from March 2010 saying it would no longer be allowed because "spiny dogfish are classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as Endangered in the Northwest Atlantic and globally as Vulnerable".

    So, maybe we're both right?
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  16. #16
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Meat is used for F&C in England, belly flaps go to Germany to get smoked, fins to Asia to make your you know what hard, skins get made into wallets in Korea, i used to preserve the heads with guts attached to sell to medical schools. I used to cut out the pups from the females and we preserved/ bottled them, Shark in a Bottle, for sale in the seaside tourist shell shops. The pups were cut out from females that were going to market for theirbottle shark.jpg meat anyway so again nothing much was wasted. Not much of that fish gets wasted.

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  17. #17
    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    um... Wasilla...
    Posts
    826

    Default

    That's a whole lot of uses for something that most Alaskans consider trash.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  18. #18
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rod in Wasilla View Post
    That's a whole lot of uses for something that most Alaskans consider trash.
    Sadly, many alaskans are quick to dismiss as trash most anything they're unfamiliar with. Then again, a good percentage of them collect in their yards large piles of what most other folks recognize as being truly trash.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  19. #19
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rod in Wasilla View Post
    That's a whole lot of uses for something that most Alaskans consider trash.
    Its funny to me how a lot of the fish we used to consider "trash" back when i was fishing back there are now worth lots of money for the commercial fisheries!! Monkfish, skates & conger eels(ocean pout) are a few that have turned into good money fisheries. The livers of monks bring 10-15 bucks a pound. We used to run them out the scuppers when dragging for other fish and the smaller skates were only used as salted lobster bait.
    When fishing on the Copper River flats guys would lose their nets to green eyes(dogfish) and i always wondered why nobody ever tried to get a fishery going for them here? When those hooligan started washing out over the bars look out the green eyes would invade the place.

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  20. #20
    Member JR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    All I know is it takes a sharp knife (several of them actually) just to get past the skin....
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •