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Thread: first fish of the season

  1. #1
    Member aktyler's Avatar
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    Default first fish of the season

    DSC01107.jpgfirst fish this year, april somthing teenth... and an odd one it was... any idea what may have caused this... looks like whatever happened it healed well

  2. #2
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    Hard to say. Looks like an old wound. Maybe got snagged by someone when it was young? Was handle rough on the release?
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  3. #3
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    Looks like an old snag wound, though it could have also been a fair hook up with a LARGE hook.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Often as a fish twists and turns the line will catch in the top of the gill plate and tear it off like that.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Either way I forget how beautiful grayling are. Nice fish.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member Rumbarr's Avatar
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    Are those good eating ?

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    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    Yes, if cooked soon after catching. They don't freeze well. They go all soft if frozen and cooked.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by power drifter View Post
    Yes, if cooked soon after catching. They don't freeze well. They go all soft if frozen and cooked.
    I'll second that. They taste great, as long as they are eaten fresh. The best thing to do is catch a day's meal and cook them creek side, or that night.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
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    Agreed, they are great when done right. Once, on a float trip on a river off hte upper Kusko, we were on a river with little else for edible fish (too early for Dollies, no rainbows, most salmon were coloring up. So when fresh vittles got low at the end of the trip we took a few, and used what we had (some flour, almonds from the GORP, powdered milk and some butter) and made grayling almondine....was very tasty. I don't eat them often as they grow rather slowly, but they make a great shore lunch now and again.

  10. #10
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    A friend gave some smoked grayling once. It was the best smoked fish I had ever had. Fantastic!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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