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Thread: Training Resources

  1. #1

    Default Training Resources

    What's your favorite? Book, video, other?

    Looking specifically at material for pointers, getting a britt next year.

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    Member kylemac's Avatar
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    I am a newby to dog training - so no expert, but acquired some books and videos over the past year or so -- some were good and some not so much.
    As for books, I really enjoyed "How to Train Your Own Gundog" by Charles Goodall, and “Best Way to Train Your Gun Dog: The Delmar Smith Method” by Bill Tarrant. In fact, Tarrant has written several other books on the subject that were all worth reading. I also enjoyed “Wing and Shot” by Robert Wehle quite a bit. Some of these titles are a little older – just substitute “pressure” with whatever contemporary method you like and the methods hold just as true otherwise. As for videos, George Hickox has a couple really good ones and I would also recommend you check out Perfect Start and Perfect Finish by Jon and Cindy Hann.
    Good luck.

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    My favorite is the George Hickox DVD set. Any of the Smith stuff is great, too.

    Jim

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    Member Burke's Avatar
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    I concur, Delmar / Rick Smith and Hickox...Wehle is also good.
    When you mention resources, the books and videos are great and there are many to choose from, however some of your best resources are people in the field. If you can get out with folks who have experience and train with them you will find strategies and techniques that are not in books. They might stem from books but have been tweaked by experience.
    You will find that many situations will be difficult by yourself and an extra set of hands, eyes and ears will be invaluable.

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    Agree with Burke. A lot of what I know about training dogs I learned from training horses, and a lot of that is what I got from books - many books, and DVDs - and from seeing and hearing what other trainers were doing. And then I learned from the horses, and the dogs themselves. I treat each dog as being at least a little different from another, and I adapt and modify training methods I've learned in a lot of different places when working with individual animals. The really good news is that if you got your pup from proven bloodlines you can likely get by with a modicum amount of formal training and still get lucky and have a good bird dog. Good dogs pretty much just require we drive them to and from the hunting fields in a safe manner, and that we do so often. A couple of the trickiest parts to all this is introducing the gun, and fetching up your birds. You want be careful with the guns!

    Where is your Brittany coming from?

    Jim

  6. #6

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    Great advice, everyone!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim McCann View Post

    Where is your Brittany coming from?

    Jim
    We're moving to South Carolina (unfortunately, but the pup is my compensation, says the husband). I've been looking into some breeders in the state but I'm not 100% decided yet. I'd like to buy from a good breeder near "home."

  7. #7

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    After further research, I'm leaning pretty strongly towards Beeline Brittanys.

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    Beeline Brittanys...Nolan Huffman has some good dogs and is a good trainer. He's had a couple of great dogs! It may be hard getting a pup from him though; a supply and demand sort of thing. Tana Kadolpher at True Grit Britts in MT is another good source for Brittanys.

    Jim

  9. #9

    Default What about Joan Bailey?

    Just throwing in my 2 cents here... but I really thought the two books by Joan Bailey, "How to Help Gun Dogs Train Themselves" and "How to Have the Best Trained Gun Dog" were excellent training guides for the beggining gun dog trainer like me. Also am really enjoying Larry Meuller's "Speed Train Your Own Bird Dog".

    Jason

  10. #10

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    So excited! Put in my deposit today for one of Nolan's pups. He's got a long waiting list for females, but not for males, so next spring I should have my dog.

    Setters, I have the first book you mentioned and I really liked it.

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    Congratulations Dreamer of Dreams! With four male Brittanys I must say how I prefer males for several reasons. Good choice.

    Jim

  12. #12

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    Gun Dog by Richard Wolters or Walters.

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    Wolters was a good bull sh*t artist but wasn't much of a retriever trainer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard N View Post
    Wolters was a good bull sh*t artist but wasn't much of a retriever trainer.
    I've seen this opinion before, but I can also say that I have two friends that have used this resource for the bulk of their training,and both have darn good hunting dogs.............I have no huge opinion on it, other than it's just another resource to go through and pull out a little info. They both swear by it.

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    There is nothing wrong with looking at old school training books but they only addressed one way of training. If I remember Walters book in the first few pages he tells you you're going to hit your dog. That's how I learned first with Bert Carlson and Paul Shoemaker, when if that dog didn't work out you just gave it away or shot it. The breeding was not as complex as it is now. I was acutally talked out of a great little 11 mo old retiever one afternoon because she would not do something the Brook Van der Brake wanted. No option to work around a problem. You really have to find options that are up to date on positive training to ensure that your dog has the best chance. The book I found was "How to speed train your gun dog." I couldn't understand a bit of it. the guy basically says if you have a rescued dog forget it - so a waste for me.
    Jon and Cindy Hann are doing a seminar in Alaska in July with the Greatland Versitile Hunting group. There may be room for an observer. They are listed in Alaska Dog News - club listings at www.alaksadognews.com and click on the club and calendar listings. I think read the books, but the best source is training with people, work on puppy obedience, play fetch and find, get into a general group obedience class by about 6 mos. at the same time see if you can work with people who really know the breed so if there is a conflict in obedience training vs. field training you can address it.

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