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Thread: How big is too big for halibut to be good eating?

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    Default How big is too big for halibut to be good eating?

    At what size is a halibut not as good for eating?

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    "as good"... as what? as the best you can get? or as good as can be expected?
    well i know i will take a lot of crap, but i am not too thrilled by anything over #50.
    given my druthers, (and owning a boat and being able to fish whenever i want i have my druthers...<grin>) we don't kill halibut over around #20-25. bear in mind that we don't put halibut in the freezer for the winter, and only eat them as we want them.
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    Halibut you buy at the store and eat in a restaurant is minimum 20lbs (based on 32 inch minimum), so a good portion of it is probably well over 20lbs (comm guys are incentivized to catch bigger fish, thereby using less gas/equipment to catch their quota)...something to think about. The mercury issue with the big guys is something to think about as well...

    http://www.hss.state.ak.us/press/200...onsumption.htm

    Only five species of sport-caught Alaska fish had high enough mercury levels to warrant limiting consumption to two meals or less per week for these sensitive groups. Yelloweye rockfish, large lingcod (40-45 inches) and large halibut (50-90 pounds) can be eaten as often as twice a week, while salmon shark, spiny dogfish, very large lingcod (over 45 inches) and very large halibut (over 90 pounds) can be consumed as often as once a week. Because commercially caught halibut weigh an average of about 33 pounds, halibut purchased from stores or restaurants is safe for this group to eat up to four times a week.

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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rode Warrior View Post
    At what size is a halibut not as good for eating?
    IMO about 100# and up. It just doesn't keep well for awhile. The pieces get so thick that in order to cook it fully you end up drying it out and it's not that great.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    I agree with Homer Dave. I normally don't keep fish over 50 lbs. The best ones are below 50 lbs.

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    no such thing, the bad charters just tell you that so youll be happy getting the chickens.
    Semper Fi!

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greythorn3 View Post
    no such thing, the bad charters just tell you that so youll be happy getting the chickens.
    (gong sounding) Wrong!!!
    but believe what you want.....
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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    For eating I would much rather bring home a couple of 40 pounders, than a 100 pounder. Not to mention I prefer to leave those big breeding females down there to do their thing.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    I like fish in the 20-40 pound range. If I am going to spend the money to get out there my limit of fish in that weight range keeps me in fish long enough to be able to afford to go out again without killing the biguns. I'd love to catch one in the triple digits, but I don't think I would keep her. The little guys are fine by me!

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Just like beef, the younger the stock the more tender and juicy it is gonna be...!!! you want to keep a tough old dry "hen" that weighs 200 lbs go ahead... but I don't want anything over 40 lbs to go in my freezer...

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    Foul, Game or Fish, younger = tender. Fishon!

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    I think the bigger ones freeze better. I like 10# - 30# fresh and 40# - 80# if I am freezing them. I let almost everything go over 100#. I have kept a few 100# plus fish when nothing else was biting. The meat was still good, but definitely not as nice as the smaller fish.

    Big_E

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    In SE Alaska on a charter 22.5 lbs or 37in on a charter on a non charter any thing under 60 lbs is fine any thing over is fish and chips!

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    I catch big fish for my client's cause that's what they want and that's what I deliver! most of them don't know any better! they just want that photo by that big flat fish. Not there fault they don't know the difference in the table fair from a 18lber to a 280lber! at the end of a long season my family and I will stock the frezz with 18's or less.great sushi! not because I cant find big fish!!!!!! but because the little ones are a bigger hit at are table! To answer your question from my point of view.... I would say that it is all great no matter what size! just be open to different recipes depending on the size! there are lots!!!!!! If you have the chance to let a big halibut go then let it go!! and good on ya!!! if your tryin to feed your family! then box that sonof *****!!!! good luck......

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    Member Albradley's Avatar
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    I will be perfectly honest...If I catch a +300# And I think I can win the derby with it..Well I guess that fish is gonna be delicious lol
    There's a fine line between fishing....

    and standing on the shore like an idiot! ALLEN BRADLEY-TANGLE LAKES ADVOCATE/FANBOY

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    The bigger... the drier and wormier. That's a fact.

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    halibut are like a fine wine, and much better when larger and aged..
    Semper Fi!

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    I have never caught one over 30 so i guess all the butts i caught were great LOL

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    Charter captains that catch chickens only, are the ones that started the rumor that big fish aren't good to eat,.......,total bull....

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    We prefer 40 to 60 lb fish. Once caught they need to have their gills cut so that they bleed out and need to be filleted and on ice within a few hours. Cloudy cold days are better than sunny hot ones for fish preseveration. We also like the thickness of the filet of that size for the roasts that come out of the filet, about 2 inches thick ... Every year though our guests would feel terrible if we let the plus 100 lb'er go.

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