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Thread: Recurve for hunting?

  1. #1
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default Recurve for hunting?

    Thinkin' of giving bow hunting another try but I know from past experiance I dont like compound bows. Any thaughts or experiance hunting Alaska with a recurve?(Bou's and Moose)

  2. #2

    Default

    it doesnt get any better.. I've since gone to longbows specifically however my first big game animal in Alaska was a Moose with a Bob Lee recurve, followed up by a sheep. Then I made the switch to longbows.

    They do take a ton of practice and dedication. Are more difficult to tune (longbows more so then recurves), which most people do NOT spend enough time doing. Seems they make the switch for simplicity, forgetting the basics of archery. Take the time in the beginning and your accuracy an success with follow! If you dont, your expereinces will be followed with nothing but headaches and lost/missed game.

    The enjoyment of shooting a stick is a year around process. It's not something you can pick up 2 3 or 4 weeks before season. It's something most of us do year round atleast to some extent. To keep muscles in shape and to stay proficient. The learning process is huge in the beginning however once you've learned it, you cannot lay this down for a period of time and expect to come back to it. Unlike riding a bike, it takes regular maintence. It does come back fairly quick to some degree, depending on how good you want to be.

    If you do get into this. I'd recommend shooting a recurve with a medium to high wrist grip and shoot either aluminums or carbon. I started with woods, and 17 yrs later STILL shoot woods. They do take some understanding unto themselves and add another fairly big step into the process that can make or break you in the beginning. To keep things simple start with something consistent. Alum and carbons have this, woods in general do not. If you are however hellbent on shooting woods. I'll make two recommendations to you. First buy some you think are going to fly and work on form. Dont worry so much on accuracy for this beginning phase. Next when you think you're comfortable with the mechanics of shooting a stickbow, order a test kit. Some arrow makers sell them, as does some bow companys. Find the best shaft that flies out of that bow and order that shaft. DO NOT walk into a store and start buying arrows just because a chart says so, or because someone THINKS you should be shooting X arrow spine or shaft. This is where stickbows and wheels part ways. Each bow is different, and each shooter is different. Charts are starting points, they'll get you close. To be proficient, you'll need to shoot a bunch of different spined shafts. And presto, you're shooting will turn around 10 fold!

    If you do get into this, another recommendation I'd HIGHLY recommend is buying G Fred Asbells instinctive shooting ONE and TWO. If you're specifically going to shoot longbows, buy Asbells Two book and Byron Fergusons become the arrow. However realize these two men shoot different styles and have different approaches, they both have information that many take years to learn. YOu can pick and choose but when it comes to tuning they are very similar and both have excellent tips. If you're only going with a recurve for now, DO NOT buy Fergusons book. Though there is information here that CAN help you. Asbell has it all covered in his 1 and 2 books. If you only get one book, get asbells number 1 for recurves, and if you shoot a longbow, get his number 2 and you'll be well on your way.

    Dunno where you're located but if ya want to give some bows a run through I've got more then a few. Mostly longbows though. I'll be leaving here for the summer again, first for a month and a half turkey hunting and steelhead fishing spree, then off to skipper a boat again for the summer. I am however up in Fairbanks.

    Dunno if you winter in the valley or not but if you do. Walk into the palmer office and ask for Rich P. Let him know I sent ya (Dan). There are many other great shooters down that way. Get with blacksheep, or trad archers of alaska and hang out with them, or atleast shoot withem and see what they are doing, both the good and bad shooters. Again we all shoot differently, and you can tweak your system by nit picking pieces and parts of our approaches to suit yourself. eventually you'll come to something that works for you. Once you find it is about the time you'll change, or your bow will break, etc etc etc. Oh the joys of shooting a stick and string

  3. #3

    Default Basic Archery Tackle

    Some good advice above. If I were to share any advice w/ you, it would be to start off slow by keeping it basic and simple.

    I've been shooting stickbows since my youth taking my first whitetail deer w/ one at age 12. There is absolutely nothing wrong w/ compounds, but, they've never felt as good to me in the hand while hunting as a stickbow. To me, one of my favorite hunting bows is my jackknife Great Northern Critter Gitter. This feels right to me and works, but, it is most definitely a different animal than the longer English styled longbows or any of the recurves for that matter.

    As far as recurves go, I own and have used quite a few. Martins are a good bang for the buck, but, I'm of the opinion that a Bob Lee take down is about the best thing going for the money spent. It makes an excellent starter bow as it is very smooth and forgiving, yet, makes for an excellent bow for the experienced bowyer. It is center shot, does not stack and is very easy to set up and shoot. Like fly fishing, many will have a desire to go to more basic equipment over time. I enjoy the lightness of a trim longbow and I enjoy shooting a wooden shaft off my hand around a wooden handle. But, going back to a smooth centershot longbow always feels as comfortable to me as an easy chair and slippers.

    I agree that Asbell is a gold standard to this style of hunting. I suggest you gravitate to his style and teachings. The "dwarf" himself, Paul Brunner, has a wealth of knowledge and experience. I learned a lot from him.

    A skilled bowyer w/ a simple recurve shooting wooden arrows around 9-10gr per pound draw w/ a good two blade fixed broadhead, can ethically and effectively take down many big game animals w/in reasonable distances. Though not impressive in speed, this combination is phenominal in actual penetration!!

    I'm not versed in the newer trend of carbons for traditional tackle, but, the Alaskan Bowhunting Company is and they appear to be on the right track w/ their carbon arrow system.

    Good Luck,
    GVA

  4. #4

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    Alaska bowhunting supply, Ed Schleif.

    You can also contact Straight flight arrow company, Brian Stewart.

    Or look for Martin Ferris, another wood arrow builder.

    Ed Scott, owl bows is also in anchorage.

    dunno why I forgot to put a list of peoples/ suppliers. Most of these you'll find by going to black sheep or TAA.

    Can't forget Jack Harrison, in wasilla.

    the best wood arrow guy in my opinion, Russ Kucinski.

    These are all people from the valley to Anchorage. And I'm sure I've missed a few, or more then a few, has been a few years since I've been down that way and have shot with "da boys".

    Lastly, this was reads

    Charts are starting points, they'll get you close. To be proficient, you'll need to shoot a bunch of different spined shafts. And presto, you're shooting will turn around 10 fold!


    And is supposed to read

    Charts are starting points, they'll get you close. To be proficient, you'll need to shoot a bunch of different spined shafts TO FIND THE PROPER SHAFT THAT FLY's THE BEST OUT OF YOUR BOW WITH YOU SHOOTING IT. And presto, you're shooting will turn around 10 fold!

  5. #5
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default English medieval longbows

    There is a pastor located at Whale Pass on POW who makes world class English medieval longbows if you really want to get into it. He owns Welchman Longbow Company. I don't have a ph.#. If you're interested I can do some research to find him.

    kingfisherktn

  6. #6
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default Longbow maker

    I found a name if you're interested. Jerry Welch Whale Pass, POW

  7. #7
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks guys a wealth of information here!! I killed 2 white tail with a long bow when I was a kid back in Michigans UP, but somhow got away from the sport when I switched over to single shot handgun huntting. I manly was concerned I mignt be trying to knock down bigger game with inadiquite( Man I wish I could spell better) equipment. Seems like the white tail I took went a long way before dropping. The advice on ptractice is right on the money, in fact I'd say the same for fierarms. Case in point a buddy of mine complained bitterly that his gun was junk. I had him meet me at the range with it and sure enough at 100 yards he could barely keep them in the kill zone. I double checked his scope mounts gave the gun a good look over then had a seat at the bench. Same gun same yardage I had 2 inch groups alittle high and to the left but 2 inch groups. Differance, I put in the range time and now so dose he.

  8. #8

    Default

    well, as I'm sure you are well aware, not all situations are even remotely the same.

    Take for instance a perfect shot elk vs a perfect shot moose, which is going to go farther? Elk by far typically!

    Or how about a Goat vs a caribou.....For some odd reason goats are just a hard to kill critter.

    Don't base everything off of one or two experiences. None of my whitetails made it over 75 yards, most died within site or very close to it.

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