Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Shrimping, one string or two?

  1. #1
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default Shrimping, one string or two?

    Looks like I might be investing in a safe-t-puller and a set of ladner pots. So the question is, drop them all in one shot, or do 3 on one string and 2 on the other. I'm curious if the yields will be better with two sepperate shots in the same terrain but say 1/4 mile apart then having all 5 pots within 400 feet of eachother. I know it'll be a little bit more work to drop two strings, but I'm thinking for day trips where you'll just be doing one drop while you fish two strings might be more effective. Just curious if anyone has compared one vs. two and what your results have been.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  2. #2
    Member bkbaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    773

    Default

    I like two strings. My puller really likes two strings. Potbuilder got me to spread out my pots on the ground line and that has paid off big time. Spreading out on two strings keeps my eggs in two baskets, don't both get lost at once very often, helps prospect a little more too.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    712

    Default

    I run 150 - 300 feet of the blue stuff from Donalson's between ground pots (longer the better), and a 600' shot of sinking line up to the buoy. Since all of the line generally comes in 600' shots, divvying it up is pretty easy. 5/16th is worth extra cost over 1/4 as it handles a lot better on deck.

    Last year with seven pots, I ran two strings of two and one of three. This year with five, it's two strings of two and a single.

    I find that strings of two or singles will outfish strings of three, on a per-pot count basis.

    Keep an eye out on shore for buoys! I have yet to buy a pot buoy. Mine look like hell, but they hold air, and new they'd cost 50-100 bucks each.

    Find some scrap steel (my wife found a 10' piece of #12 rebar in a ditch near our house while walking the kids) to weight your pots. You want them heavier than they come, if they're the stainless ones. The dipped steel ones are heavy enough.

    You're welcome to come by and look at how I roll, Paul. I run five ladners and a honda capstan-winch-type puller.

  4. #4

    Default

    I run three on one line and two on another. I am still new to the shrimping thing so we spread them out a bit til we find some then reset them both in that spot. Kinda a not all eggs in one basket kinda thing. Plus my pulled prolly could not handle five pots on one line anyway.

    Dan

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I still have over 1000' of poly line that I plan to splice to 600' lengths of leadline. So if I get 3 shots of the leadline, and splice on 300-400' of the floating poly I'd be able to setup 3 shots for 2, 2 and 1. I used a large found boat fender for a float, works fairly well.

    I'm still torn on which way to go with a puller. The brutus/ace are tempting due to cost, but my experience using one is they are kinda gutless and will burn out if pulling weighted pots. So the next thought is the safe-t-puller, and either the 1200 or 1600 watt unit, and I'm leaning towards the 1600 watt.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  6. #6
    Member jrogers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,539

    Default

    Paul, I have the Safe-t-puller, and it is fine, but I am not sure what size it is in watts. My quote talks about it as a 200lb puller. It works just fine, and has more than enough capacity.

    On the issue of one string or two, I see two advantages to splitting the pots up:

    1. You don't have all your eggs in one basket if something goes wrong. This will happen sooner or later that you come back to no buoy because someone ran over your buoy, stole them, you set too deep, an ice berg drug them off, etc.

    2. With two locations you have some diversity in your sets, and it give you the ability to prospect more and see what two different locations can produce. Often I reset my three pot string on the better of the two locations, and reset the two pot string on another guess of where I think will do well.
    2009 Seawolf 31'
    www.seawolfmarine.com
    Fully Loaded

  7. #7

    Default

    I have one of those brutis/ace haulers. It does fine with my three and two pot strings. Pots weighted with two pieces of rebar each per Potbuilder. I'd like one of those more expensive pullers but it's not in the budget. The ace passes my splices just fine but I have to restring the line when we pull in a pot otherwise it gets hung up on the dropper.

    Dan

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Valdez, AK
    Posts
    8

    Default

    jrogers, I recently invested in a safe-t-puller and am redoing my shrimp set-up to incorporate a floating ground line as my lead line was snagging the rocks. I plan on splicing the two together but am wondering about the best method of attaching the pots to avoid problems with the puller. In the past I tied loops in my main line and used clips on the pots. I'm worried the puller won't like the loops. What would you advise?

    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    Paul, I have the Safe-t-puller, and it is fine, but I am not sure what size it is in watts. My quote talks about it as a 200lb puller. It works just fine, and has more than enough capacity.

    On the issue of one string or two, I see two advantages to splitting the pots up:

    1. You don't have all your eggs in one basket if something goes wrong. This will happen sooner or later that you come back to no buoy because someone ran over your buoy, stole them, you set too deep, an ice berg drug them off, etc.

    2. With two locations you have some diversity in your sets, and it give you the ability to prospect more and see what two different locations can produce. Often I reset my three pot string on the better of the two locations, and reset the two pot string on another guess of where I think will do well.

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I ended up getting the safe-t puller, 5 ladner pots and have two shots of line. My plan was to splice 300' of poly to 600' of leadline, but somehow I ended up getting 600' shots of groundline. Anyhow, I rigged them per Donalsons recomendation to make loops of gangion to clip the pots to. It works really slick, the loops run through the puller with no problem. The gangion provides some safety in that if you snag one pot, the gangion should break before the main line, and you'll be out 1 pot vs. however many you have on the string. Since I don't have leadline in my strings, I have a couple of 1# sinkers on clips that I clip to the line to keep the line from piling on the surface.

    I didn't do that well shrimping this weekend, more of a learning curve, but we did come home with about a gallon of tails.

    The safe-t pullers awesome! I added 5#'s of lead to two of the pots, the first ones to get dropped in the string. On the last drop I put all 5 pots on one string, so 10#'s of lead in addition to the 5 pots and 900' of line with several pounds of lead clipped to the line. It pulled that string with absolutely no bogging.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  10. #10
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    I have run 5 different lines and bouys and done well. It is great for scouting a bunch of different areas ll at once. If I find a good spot I will move two pots per line and a single. Last year I lost both pots off a string due to a hang up in rough seas, it got too wild with water coming over the boat to mess around too long trying to free it up so I pulled with all 330hp till it snapped. Lost two pots but the boat and my family made it to the dock. If I had all 5 pots on that string I would of lost everything.

  11. #11
    Member jrogers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,539

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CCC View Post
    jrogers, I recently invested in a safe-t-puller and am redoing my shrimp set-up to incorporate a floating ground line as my lead line was snagging the rocks. I plan on splicing the two together but am wondering about the best method of attaching the pots to avoid problems with the puller. In the past I tied loops in my main line and used clips on the pots. I'm worried the puller won't like the loops. What would you advise?

    Thanks

    I take a section of ganglion and tie it into the main line by looping through one of the strands on the main line. You have to watch the size of the loops. If they catch on the guide pulley next to the main wheel on the puller, it will rip them out. I also sometimes just attach my halibut clips to the mainline and this works fine, but there is a bit more of a risk of losing a pot this way. The puller does have a lot of torque. This can be a bad thing in that it will break a line before it stops pulling, at least with the lighter poly line.
    2009 Seawolf 31'
    www.seawolfmarine.com
    Fully Loaded

  12. #12

    Default

    Last year I dropped two strings of 4 and this year it will be one string of 5. This is purely for convience sake since we do other things out there too. By the end of the season, we will have all the shrimp we can eat for the year. Stay away from the halibut clips. I use them for a while until I lost a pot. They will twist on the line until eventually the line wraps around just right and they pop right off.

    Pot Builder showed me some button things, can't remember what they are called, that fit right into a tight loop on the line and they can twist all they want and won't come off. I have a light commercial safe-t-puller and it pulls up 5 weighted pots without grunting.

    The only disadvantage to the safe-t-puller is that you have to manually guide the line into the tub. They make a safety-hauler that would eliminate that and Pot-Builder sells another make that is very strong and mounts so that you can put the tub right under the puller.
    What-a-Day
    27' x 9.5' Glacier Craft - Volvo 300hp D4 Diesel
    Remember: Any fool can be uncomfortable.
    Denny

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •