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Thread: Knife sharpeners.

  1. #1
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    Default Knife sharpeners.

    I've been using a Lansky, stone guide rod set-up, for the last few years. I sharpen hunting, fishing, kitchen, and pocket knifes with it. The clamp mount allows you to make accurate and repeatable sharpening strokes. I can get my Gerber hunting knife sharp enough to shave hair off my leg. (Usually not in the habit of leg shaving). A decent kit runs about 50 bucks or so.

    Couple things I don't like about it. First, it's hard to keep a consistant angle around the curve to the point. Second, it takes a lot of diligence to make a sharp blade.

    What do you use to sharpen your knifes.

  2. #2
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Smile The lazy man's way...

    Quote Originally Posted by TR
    ...What do you use to sharpen your knifes.
    I take mine in and have them done by a knife shop. Then I touch them up myself. Cheating, I know... but it saves a LOT of time.

    I have a Lansky too, and sometimes use it if I have the time...

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    Default

    My grandfather taught me looong ago how to sharpen knives. If I didn't do it right he'd say something like, "I could ride all the way to Buffalo in that edge and not cut my butt." So I just learned using a stone.

  4. #4

    Default I use a diamand hone set of 4 graduated plates

    and a couple differnt hard Arkansas stones. I keep a Shrade steel hone in my pack for field use.
    I picked up a big ceramic stick from The Vitrinox Lady, it is great, It helps to keep the edge in shape between major sharpening sessions. I am about to make a leather/jewlers rouge hone as well.
    Rob

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    Leahy, do you hand sharpen too?

    ...ride to Buffalo... that's funny.

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    Member PatrickH's Avatar
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    Default Hunter's Honer

    I have been using a sharpener called the "Hunter's Honer" I think. It has two carbide rods set at an angle. It is light, small and puts a very good edge on my knives. I got it at the Sportsman's Show. It is small enough to toss in my day pack with my hunting gear.

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    Thumbs up

    I agree with PatrickH I also purchased one at the Sportsmans show. I love it I have already taking it out hunting, fishing and on a packtrip with my horses. Light, small. super easy, and makes a great edge and its made in the USA!

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    What's this Hunters Hone look like. Hand held V shaped contraption?

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    Default

    One of these

    and finish with EZELap diamond hone.


    Foolproof....relatively!

  10. #10

    Default TR yes, I do

    But I have one of those little Hunter hone things too.
    and jsut about one each of everything else, trying to find the best way for each style of blade and steal I use.
    Rob

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    Default

    I use one similar to Lansky's (don't remember the brand), but the hones (diamond) are wider and longer than Lanky's. Also, the rods used to maintain the angle are built-in right under the hones. All you have to do is to pull on the end of the rod until it comes out fully. I bought this one and gave the Lanky's to a friend of mine.

  12. #12
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    Ray, that sounds like a better set-up. Lansky rods are thin and the guides are flimsy. If able, please report the brand name.

  13. #13

    Default DMT

    I have been using these things for the past 15 years and they work great.
    http://www.dmtsharp.com/products/diafold.htm

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TR
    Ray, that sounds like a better set-up. Lansky rods are thin and the guides are flimsy. If able, please report the brand name.
    TR,

    Here is the link for the "Gatco" sharpeners at Cabela's:
    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...ners&noImage=0

    As you can see it's a little expensive, but the guide rods are built-in under the hone. The rods slide out when one pulls on them. The kit comes with honing oil, and three diamond hones of the following grit: 200, 400, 600, and a serrated-blade sharpener. It also comes with the small vice (guide) to hold the knife in place, but a pedestal for it is optional. To see what the pedestal looks like, click on the link "Back To GATCO Sharpeners" at the bottom of the web page. The pedestal is the red color stand.

    However, one can use the sharpeners without the pedestal by placing the guide on a towel (or something) on to of a table. I prefer to use the pedestal when sharpening my knives at the tent. But I imagine that one could easily build a pedestal at home.

    I didn't like the guide rods in the Lanky sharpening kit. The wing-nut, regardless of how much you tighten it, does not firmly secure the guide rod in place. This problem does not exist with the Gatco sharpeners.

    P.S. I just looked at the kit at Cabela's, and realized that it comes with a "Free Pedestal Mount" (mine was not free).

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    Default

    Ray, thanks for the info.

    I like the look of Gatco system. The Lansky is a great idea but lacks durability. Seems Gatco solved this problem. I'll be getting this next when the rig I have now wears out.

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    Smile Some experience. . .

    I've been a woodcarver as an occupation for over 20 years so have sharpened really sharp too a lot of knives.

    The reasons most guys can't sharpen a knife are:
    1) can't maintain a consistent blade-to-shapener angle;
    2) use too soft a sharpener for the blade;
    3) no patience.

    1) All knives come from the factory with an angle at the sharp edge. Dulling consists of the rounding over that angle. When you go to resharpen, you are attempting to recreate a sharp angle. However, when one starts to grind the blade on some sort of sharpener, they may or may not present the blade at the same angle it was ground with from the factory. If the blade is presented to the sharpener at less than the factory angle, sharpening will occur at the heel of the angle, leaving the edge untouched until the heel is ground away. This is the most common reason for becoming discouraged, thinking that nothing's happening. Pick your angle, maintain it rigidly throughout the sharpening sweep, be patient, and your knife will get sharp. Don't let others sharpen your once-sharpened knife their angle of attack will probably be different than yours. The reason the Lansky sharpeners work is precisely because they maintain a consistent angle of attack.

    2) Virtually all knives today are stainless steel, which is much too hard to be sharpened by carborundum, India, or even Arkansas stones. Use a diamond sharpener followed by ceramic for razor sharpness. Alternatively, use a white or black Arkansas stone for final honing. Rouged strops also work well.

    3) Don't give up. Common sense will tell you that a consistent angle against something hard enough to cut the steel of your knife will produce a sharp blade though you may have to create an entirely new angle of sharpness to do it. Practice. . .

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    Default good

    marcus; good advice. j

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    Default Concur

    Thanks Marcus.

    This is why I gravitate to the Lansky/Gatco types that force a consitant angle. I want my edges to be wicked sharp. Patience I have, but dexterity decreases as the empty beer cans increase.

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    Default getting the tip sharp

    I have, through trial and lots of error, learned to put a 'good enough' edge on my fillet knife but have not yet figured out how to get the tip pin point sharp. Would one of those kits do this? I use a diamond stick but haven't figured how to get that last bit on the tip.
    It is amazing how quick that nice edge fades while filleting reds and the occasion king.

  20. #20
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    Default Ideas...

    Quote Originally Posted by Chitina
    I have, through trial and lots of error, learned to put a 'good enough' edge on my fillet knife but have not yet figured out how to get the tip pin point sharp. Would one of those kits do this? I use a diamond stick but haven't figured how to get that last bit on the tip.
    It is amazing how quick that nice edge fades while filleting reds and the occasion king.
    Chitina, to get the tip of your knife needle sharp, use a flat diamond sharpener instead of a stick. Finish off with a ceramic rod or a white Arkansas stone. If your edge isn't holding up, you've got: a) an inferior knife (I use a Kershaw fillet knife), or b) too shallow an angle of attack when sharpening. A low angle, say below 20-degrees, will produce a thin, fragile edge, which, especially if the knife is made of inferior steel, will dull easily. Try sharpening at a steeper angle.

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