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Thread: Varmint Rifles..

  1. #1
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    Default Varmint Rifles..

    On this subject, here are a few questions about various models of varmint rifles.

    1. Where is the full auto switch is on a Kalashnikov rifle? Be specific.

    2. Where is the full auto switch for the M-14 rifle?

    3. What caliber is/was the original Galil rifle?

    4. Who designed the U.S. M16 rifle?

    5. Who was the first manufacturer of the M-16 rifle?

    6. What is the M63/M63A rifle?

    7. What is the designation of the USMC SAW?

    8. What was the predessor of the USMC SAW?

    9. What caliber was the Sturmgewehr? Be specific.

    10. Who is the maker of the SR-25 rifle?

    Bonus:

    Can US citizens legally own fully automatic rifles?

    Do your own work, answers will be posted tomorrow.
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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    1.- Integrated with the safety selector on the right hand side of the action.

    2. - Right side of the receiver, above the trigger.

    3. - 5.56 or 7.62 (don't know which was first though).

    4. - Eugene Stoner

    5. - Armalite

    6. - A light machine gun in 5.56x45 release in 1963 (another Stoner design)

    7. - M249

    8. - The Browning BAR

    9. - 8mm (7.92mm Kurz)

    10. - Knights Armament co. (another Stoner design)

    Bonus - Depends on the state, but usually states will allow it with a $200 tax stamp (transfer fee) and the weapon has to have been manufactured prior to May 1986.
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    1. Not all Kalashnikov rifles are capable of full auto fire. On the select fire versions, the selector is also the dust cover on the right side of the action.

    2. The M-14 selector switch is removable. The selector assembly can be installed on the right rear of the action below the groove for the bolt assembly to move. Back in the 1970s and early 80s the Navy used M-14s with most of them issued without the selector assembly.

    3. 5.56x45mm, The Israel Galili is based on the Finnish M-62,

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    My Galil is a 308, and I know they come in 223 as well, but not sure about its original history and caliber.

    now, as a varmit rifle?........

    well, unless you consider (****) as varmints!!!

    Formerly known as one who clings to guns and religion

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    Default

    Same answers as AK Mud (...very nice work guy!), EXCEPT #2 & #8

    #2. Located in the stock on the right side below the action, but the "switch" was really a recessed fitting that required a separate "key" to turn and activate...this was a trick question.

    #8. M60 Machine gun

    Doc
    Last edited by Doc; 03-06-2007 at 07:38.

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    Default #8

    The SAW replaced the M16A1. The A2 does not have full auto capability....only 3 round burst (which is usually only 2 rounds when you first switch it from semi). The SAW fires 5.56 just like the M16, but is a true machine gun. I don't know about now, but when I was in the army infantry platoons still had the same number of M60s assigned, and the SAWs were additional to those assigned at the squad level. At least that is how they were doing it in 10th Mountain. I also know that the infantry guys I talked to thought the SAW was a POS because it jammed pretty easily. I suspect this was mainly due to poor cleaning, but I never personally used one enough to experience any problems. My personal weapons were the 9mm (another POS), and an M60D. Like many other guys I knew, I also occasionally carried an additional unauthorized weapon since I didn't have a lot of confidence in the take-down power of the 9mm. In my case, it was a 357.

  7. #7
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    Default Answers...

    1. Where is the full auto switch is on a Kalashnikov rifle? Be specific.

    It is the safety lever located on the right side of the receiver. Top position safe, first step down full auto, bottom semi-auto. Some are semi-auto only (Type 56)

    2. Where is the full auto switch for the M-14 rifle?

    Right rear of the receiver above the trigger, a round knob that is rotated 270 degrees to engage the auto sear. (Some had different shaped knobs but all were located in the same place.)

    3. What caliber is/was the original Galil rifle?

    Originally 5.56x45 then later a 7.62x51 was made, they were also made in 7.62x39. A Galil is really a copy of the Valmet M-76, wooden stock rifle, with some minor changes.

    4. Who designed the U.S. M16 rifle?

    Eugene Stoner.

    5. Who was the first manufacturer of the M-16 rifle?

    Armalite made some early prototypes but Stoner left Armalite in '62 and went to Cadillac Gage of Costa Mesa, CA. They made the prototypes and test rifles and Colt got the first large scale contract.

    6. What is the M63/M63A rifle?

    A modular weapon system that could be configured into an M16, a magazine fed full auto rifle or a belt fed light machine gun. Several different variations of it were made the last variation bought by the Navy was the Mk 23 mod 0 used 150 round belts in a plastic box mounted on the bottom of the receiver. The receiver (lower) was actually turned upside down for the auto rifle and the LMG version.

    7. What is the designation of the USMC SAW?

    M249.

    8. What was the predessor of the USMC SAW?

    The Stoner belt fed LMG.

    9. What caliber was the Sturmgewehr? Be specific.

    7.92x33 (8mm Kurz)

    10. Who is the maker of the SR-25 rifle?

    The maker was Knight Armament Co. Reed Knight was also contracted by the Navy to come up to Little Creek, VA and work on our Stoners, quite a character, this guy.

    I have owned most and fired all of these varmint guns, except the original Sturmgewehr, just the caliber.

    Bonus:

    Can US citizens legally own fully automatic rifles?

    Yes. There is a limited number of type three guns available and they can no longer be manufactured or imported (since 1986) they are transfered to new owners after paying a tax of, I think it is still $200, and undergoing an extensive back ground investigation.

    These answers are to the best of my recollection and knowledge. We could also probably argue about some minor points, but for the most part, I think they are accurate.
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  8. #8
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Right rear of the receiver above the trigger, a round knob that is rotated 270 degrees to engage the auto sear. (Some had different shaped knobs but all were located in the same place.)
    Back when I was a Navy Gunnersmate, (before the Army and later Air Force), we had and used M-14s as well as M-16s. We also had M-21s in the Army and M-14s for the Air Force maksmanship teams and the P.J. Rescue guys...

    The selector switch itself is a semi square paddle with the post offset. (think of a semi square ping-pong paddle with the handel offset.)
    This was installed and then rotated to the full or semi-auto positions. The reason it was offset was so that the firing party could feel which position it was in without looking. Such as in the dark.

    When the selector was removed. It was replaced by a block which looked like a little round knob.. Thus making the weapon semi-auto only.
    We used to issue most as semi-auto only and then a few with the selectors for the guys designated as auto-riflemen...

    Some Air Guard units recently issued re-worked M-14s with scopes to their SFS (Security Forces Squadrons) that were deploying to the sandbox. They make a much better airbase defense rifle than an M-4 carbine.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Back when I was a Navy Gunnersmate, (before the Army and later Air Force), we had and used M-14s as well as M-16s. We also had M-21s in the Army and M-14s for the Air Force maksmanship teams and the P.J. Rescue guys...

    The selector switch itself is a semi square paddle with the post offset. (think of a semi square ping-pong paddle with the handel offset.)
    This was installed and then rotated to the full or semi-auto positions. The reason it was offset was so that the firing party could feel which position it was in without looking. Such as in the dark.

    When the selector was removed. It was replaced by a block which looked like a little round knob.. Thus making the weapon semi-auto only.
    We used to issue most as semi-auto only and then a few with the selectors for the guys designated as auto-riflemen...

    Some Air Guard units recently issued re-worked M-14s with scopes to their SFS (Security Forces Squadrons) that were deploying to the sandbox. They make a much better airbase defense rifle than an M-4 carbine.
    Actually I think that paddle wheel was pinned to the round shaft and removed to limit tampering on some rifles. The paddle handle had a small round tab that stuck out about 1/8" to feel quickly. The early Marine rifles I've seen had a flat sided (hex) knob that needed a tool to turn.The rifles I'm most familiar with were round and knurled with a wide, deep slot in the middle like a big screw. It had a tab, actually a roll pin that stuck out about 3/16" inch to feel in the dark. A lot of the guns I used were modified in various ways to suit intended purposes. We had collapsable stocks with a fore grip (pistol grip) on some. It seems that each ship had a different version of the rifle, some auto some semi. It was always a hoot to shoot on on full rock and roll. I shot with a match M14 that had the selector drilled through and pinned to the receiver so it wouldn't turn, I guess it was easy to go back that way. I haven't had hold of one of these since 1981.

    What did you think of this little experiment?
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Default #8

    another take on #8 here. my experience comes from mechanized infantry / light infantry in the army. we used the SAW and the M16A1 concurrently (it was a guard unit, we didn't always get stuff very fast). we had to turn in our M60's for the SAW. then (being that the SAW couldn't really do what the 60 did, we were given the 240B - 7.62nato, and an awesome weapon, probably the best weapon the army has right now.

    i believe the marines are using both the SAW and the 240, or something very similar to the 240 right now as well. so, in my view, the SAW didn't replace anything... well, it kind of replaced the 60 - part of the time. and part of the time the 240 replaced the 60.

    the SAW is great if you clean it right. the ridiculous thing is, though, the SAW was supposed to be the ultimate all conditions, never take a break for anything - or a backseat to anything - squad weapon. we found it to be pretty moody and often unreliable. the 240B, on the other hand, is incredible. if there's ever a chance that you might get to fire one - such as recruiting events, etc., go to it and hope you get the chance.

  11. #11
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    Default 249

    The M-249 was just in the first stages of being developed when I was in. At that time we where undrstanding that it was to finally give the infantry automatic rifleman something other than "just" an M16..... as there was no difference between an auto-rifleman and any other squad member (unless he was able to acquire more mags).
    Why the Army would think that a 5.56 could replace the 7.62 M60 is beyond me!
    Just anyother REMF making desicions for the combat troops I guess...

    reuben....

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    Some views of the selectors. Can't find one other than in my armorers manual that shows the round knob we installed to make them semi-auto...

    http://www.pbase.com/mrclark/image/73366088

    http://www.pbase.com/mrclark/image/73366085

    http://www.pbase.com/mrclark/image/73410045

    The M-249 SAWs (a spin off of the Mimi) improved slightly as time went on. The ones we had in the Army left much to be desired in reliability. The later models that the Air Force SFS units obtained were better.
    I shot 600 rounds through one non-stop during a shooting demo at Issack Walton a few years back. I thought we would have to replace the barrel but we did not need to do so. I later competed with that gun and the same barrel in a machine gun competition at Ft Rich.
    I was more accurate than the M-60 crews I was competing against. But the final phase of shooting Steel -Plates the size of a head at 200 or 300 meters did not work so well.
    The 5.56 would not knock the plates over. The 7.62 guys just shot the ground in front and the flying rocks knocked the target plate over...

    The M-240s are a super reliable and fairly accurate machine gun. Although it is HEAVY.
    BUT it is nothing new.
    The M-240 family of weapons is really a variant of the FN-MAG. Which was developed in the mid-1950s. It has been in use by 70 or so countries for 50 years...
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