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Thread: what is a stainless trigger guard made of?

  1. #1

    Default what is a stainless trigger guard made of?

    anyone know what the base metal is? I bought a m70 stainless and someone did some pretty hack work on the trigger guard, I would like to tig it up, but am unsure of the metal comp, anyone know?

  2. #2
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    I would guess 416. But, here lately with the use of powdered metal technology, it's hard to say. Can you tig 416?

    I think the bottom metal parts of the M70 S/S is cast/powdered metal. (I think Ruger made them ) But I could be wrong. You could call Ruger's casting facility and ask them.
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  3. #3

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    sorry murphy, it is a win model 70 stainless gun, as far as I know you can weld anything, once you have its properties, I am just trying to get as close on the base metal as possible so after I shape it it won't show the repair through the bead blast finish......thanks

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    New member George's Avatar
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    Default ss material

    Well, I thinks Murphy's answer is as good as any about the 416ss. I have no idea whether that trigger guard is sintered or investment cast but you will have a hard time calling Winchester about it So... Ruger casting folks would be a good start or find a gunsmith who has altered, welded or customized that manufacturer/year/model/type part. ???

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Williams firearms produced some parts for Winchester, and would be about as good a contact as any to see what type of material Winchester used.

    http://www.williamsfirearms.com/

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    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Maybe try the source...

    Even though 'Winchester's' production of M70's, M94's, and 1300's stopped, and the plant shut down, they're still open for business for repairs and replacement parts.
    Wild West Guns in Anchorage might have information on what's available, or a good contact at USRA to find out.
    Anyhow, here's the US Repeating Arms Winchester Repair information.....

    U.S. Repeating Arms Winchester Service Department
    3005 Arnold Tenbrook RD
    Arnold, Missouri 63010-9406
    1-800-322-4626

    Why not give the ol' 800 number the 'ringy-dingy' and see what answers the nice lady can give you!

  7. #7

    Default

    thanks guys.
    I wish I did not have to do this, I bought a gun off a buddy, he had asked about light weight trigger guards, I told him we have milled a few to shave some weight. I guess he took it on himself to mill it with a drill press and a chainsaw file. We were making the guard a bit narrower, he drilled a bunch of holes in it. I refuse to take it in the field as a stick could poke through one of the holes and cause a bad chain of events....DOH!

  8. #8
    Member akndres's Avatar
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    Default if it is 416ss don't weld it!

    416ss shouldn't be welded because of its high sulphur content.

    347 is a "catch all" rod for most weldable stainless steels when TIG welding. It's isn't great for one specific grade, but isn't bad for most. It's kind of like Hastelloy X or W when regarding molyb steel. Your definitely better off finding out exactly what class of s/s it is before you create a post-weld cracking condition or worse... a contaminated brittle POS.
    "The rich... who are content to buy what they have not the skill to get by their own excellence, these are the real enemies of game".... Theodore Roosevelt's A Principle of the Hunt

  9. #9
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Actually,

    For what you have in mind, snag any stainless rod hanging around and fill it. I personally wouldn't have a problem even using carbon steel in there, I'd just paint it afterwards. Give it a brushed or bead blast finish and use it.
    Even easier would be to bevel the edges of the holes, fill 'em with JB Weld, work it down, and shoot it with Krylon.
    http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/sto...L+TRIGGERGUARD
    At prices like these, I'd try to repair it first, too!

  10. #10
    Member akndres's Avatar
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    Default depends on what it's worth to ya

    "Even easier would be to bevel the edges of the holes, fill 'em with JB Weld, work it down, and shoot it with Krylon."

    Why not use elmers glue and play glitter (for the rebar effect).....

    Actually your suggestion will work Darreld Walton (I would stay away from the carbon rod though...). Without seeing the trigger guards condition and not knowing the edge distance between the holes or the overall amount of material removed, led me to suggest finding the proper filler metal. If it is a world class hack job... drill press and chainsaw files are the weapons of choice..... he will have to use a lot fill metal in proportion to parent metal. In this regard you would want to match the the parent metal composition as close as possible. yes, it will be sanded/filed down and painted in the end. However a good bump to the trigger guard could crack it out later if it's in a brittle state due to contamination. Maybe I'm thinking too much into it and falling back on my job experience.
    "The rich... who are content to buy what they have not the skill to get by their own excellence, these are the real enemies of game".... Theodore Roosevelt's A Principle of the Hunt

  11. #11

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    I have a copper backer buit for the fill process, just would like ot get the alloy close so it does not show through the finish

  12. #12
    Member akndres's Avatar
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    Default website

    Highcountry

    when you find out the parent metal, here is a link I use all the time...

    http://principalmetals.com/Propertie...tainless+Steel

    It will give you the properties of weldability, machiiability, heat-treatment, cold-working, etc. Proabably way more information than you will need.

    The whole website is good. You can cross-reference different metal codes (i.e. SAE to AMS) in case they give you a series code your unfamiliar with.
    "The rich... who are content to buy what they have not the skill to get by their own excellence, these are the real enemies of game".... Theodore Roosevelt's A Principle of the Hunt

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