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Thread: Morel season

  1. #1
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    Default Morel season

    When does morel season start? Anyone got any photos and where to find them. I know in a burned area but I know they grow in certain parts like shaded areas. Any helpful tips would be appreciated.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    I'm not sure in Fairbanks, but in the Anchorage area mid may thru mid june was prime picking.







    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    All of these photos were taken the same day, in the same area.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  4. #4

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    I found a bunch of 'em in south central AK last Labor Day weekend. Yep, early September. Never thought they grew during that time of year. My only guess was we had such a rainy summer that when the sun finally did come out in early September the morels just popped up quickly. Otherwise, garnede is correct, mid-May through mid-June seems to be the right time.

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    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    can someone please fill me in on what these are for and what the hype is? Ive heard of them and seen them but what do you do with them? thanks

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    I have heard they are excellent eating. I plan on drying them for later use.

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    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    They are very good for eating. Remember there is a false morel and you need to know how to tell the difference as they are poisonous.
    The best way to distinguish between morel mushrooms and false morel mushrooms, according to the Mushroom Expert, comes when you slice them open. Morel mushrooms have a hollow center, while false morels do not.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Morel mushrooms have never been propagated commercially. This means that the only source for them is to pick them wild. That makes the price for fresh mushrooms $20-60 per pound. They are the tastiest mushroom I have ever eaten. They are mildly poisonous raw, so they must be cooked. Even light cooking renders them harmless. Depending on the area and weather morels have been found every month of the year. If there is ground without snow then there might be morels. True morels are always hollow. In the great lakes region I have seen them the size of a 20 oz bottle. In Alaska they are more the size of a bic lighter.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
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    I know its still a little early but is anyone finding any shroomage. I'm guessing as soon as this rain lets up and the sun comes out they should start poping.

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    Found the first one yesterday. I let it live to make more. I always let the first one go, its all about karma.

  11. #11
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    i want to start by saying i know people are secrative about where they find theirs but i have been wanting them for the past five years. im from Iowa and i had them every year and i came up to alaska with the military. so my question is to you all is this. is there any were in anchorage or eagle river that i can find these delicious mushrooms. any help would be loved. also if any one has any that i could buy let me know. i have seen them at freddies dehydrated but they were to expensive i thought. once again any help would be appriciated. thank you

  12. #12
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    Any place where there was a wildfire the previous year is a good place to look. If anyone was around about 15 years ago (maybe 12 or 13, can't remember exactly) when the Big Lake fire happened, the next year the place was loaded with them. Same thing about 5 or 6 years ago after the Boundary fire. I heard the fire activates the spores or something like that so the next year they sprout. A friend of mine was one of the many who picked morels out past Tok and sold them to the wholesalers who camped out out there. They were paying around $8/pound for fresh morels.

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    Saw some fresher ones at New Sagaya last weekend. They were priced at $39.99 per pound. Generally, remember the packages between $4 and $10 each. So if $39.99 was close to market price, I couldn't believe someone would pay $39.99/lb for what amounts to be a bit more than the packaging.

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