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Thread: 5077D is home in Alaska

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    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Default 5077D is home in Alaska

    Well, after a few weather delay and a relatively uneventful trip, N5077D is home and tied down in Birchwood. I kept a blog (it's not quite finished) of our adventure. It's here if you're interested.

    Best,

    John

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    Congrats. I just flew my plane up from Las Vegas to Merrill a few weeks ago. Similar exciting stories. 26.9 flight hours over 5 days.

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    Member RocketRick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sierra Hotel View Post
    Well, after a few weather delay and a relatively uneventful trip, N5077D is home and tied down in Birchwood. I kept a blog (it's not quite finished) of our adventure. It's here if you're interested.

    Best,

    John
    Good old 1958 182 A huh? Is it the 0-470?

    I have a 180B with the 0-470k engine. Just now putting the pump system together to burn Mogas.

    Keep the shiny side up ha!.

    Rick

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    I've been looking for a 180/182 to buy so I'm sure I'll be heading down to the lower 48 in the near future.
    Thanks for the blog, very interesting.

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    Member RocketRick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crnadoc View Post
    I've been looking for a 180/182 to buy so I'm sure I'll be heading down to the lower 48 in the near future.
    Thanks for the blog, very interesting.
    crnadoc - I did exactly what you plan to do last June.

    Here's some ideas for ya;

    1. Find one or two online thru all the usual sources. I started looking in ard Jan last year and by the time I flew outside I knew the prices by heart. I printed out all the listings from all sources and called and talked to the owners. This went on for several months.

    2. Call around the airports nearest there and find an A&P & preferably an IA that will go do a complete pre-buy for you before you go outside. Call it an annual or what ever. Pay the guy what he asks to get a good job done. It's good insurance. Just make SURE he does not know or done work for the owner. Very important.

    Most important things are complete logs, engine and corrosion.
    For me the cosmetic held no sway compared to the mechanics of the craft.

    At first I was looking for planes with low total hours but realized if it has been maintained, it is not a major factor at all. Others may feel diff.

    Another thing to. A plane that has received some damage that has been repaired back to specs is ok. Don't let that bother you at all. However, it wld be a good idea to fly it, or have the A&P/IA do it and make sure it flies straight and true hands off. Mine had some damage and it flies perfectly. Of course best if no DH but remember there has been no AD or changes to the 180 structural frame since it was first introduced. That may be true for the 182 also.


    The pre-buy will give you some bargaining power. I was lucky as the owner was a good guy and honest.

    I was lucky in that I got to
    Coeur d'Alene while the annual was being done and got to do a good inspection for corrosion. I got to get to know the A&P there and he made me aware a seat rail needed replacement. The owner knocked off $500 for that.

    I turned it down but when in Seattle looking for an 182 the owner called me and accepted my offer which was $7500 less then he was asking. Plus , he flew it up here at his expense. After he got here the A&P here noticed it needed a exhaust pipe. So he knocked off abt $1200 for that and a new muffler. The baffles in the muffler had burnt out and caused the exhaust pipe to burn off on the flight up.

    It's a buyer's market and with the info from the pre-buy you'll think your a master dealer Ha!.

    2. I didn't do this but should have. Get the AOPA recs or one of the groups in Oklahoma to do a title search and make sure it is clear.


    3. There is a book by John Frank a moderator on the CPA web site (Cessna.org).
    Itís a buyers guide titled ď1956 thru 1986 Cessna 182 Fixed Gear Skylane Buyers GuideĒ. I got if after I had the 180 and recommend it highly.

    4. Are you already an ace conventional gear pilot. If not you may want to consider the 182 over the 180. I have lots of confidence with the tri-gear. Not so with the TW gear and am building that now. However, it takes time. If you want to really get to it after the plane gets here and not spend so much time, money on gas & a CFI learning, Iíd get a 182. I may still do that. Havenít decided yet.

    5. Try to decide what you want on the plane. I wanted the Sportsman STOL, the float kit and maybe the ski kit. The plane I bought has it all and you canít hardly stall it. It just mushes along or slowly drops while at the high AOA.

    6. If you want the ability to burn Mogas vs 100LL then better stick to a TCM 0-470. U model is 2000 TBO I think. Most others are 1500-hrs TBO.

    7. If you have a 182 with 8.5 x 10 tires or larger and the Sportsmans STOL kit you can pretty much land anywhere a TW will once you know the plane like the back of your hand. I plan to add VGs on the stabilizer and vertical tail.

    Whelp this is pretty long winded. I hope it helps you, and maybe others, in the quest to join the birds and explore the state like it aught to be seen. For me, thatís flying and fishing.
    Good Luck!.

    Rick

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    Thanks very much for writing this up. It will be a huge help. I'm going to print it out and tack it to my wall.

    Thanks again,

    Ron

    Quote Originally Posted by RocketRick View Post
    crnadoc - I did exactly what you plan to do last June.

    Here's some ideas for ya;

    1. Find one or two online thru all the usual sources. I started looking in ard Jan last year and by the time I flew outside I knew the prices by heart. I printed out all the listings from all sources and called and talked to the owners. This went on for several months.

    2. Call around the airports nearest there and find an A&P & preferably an IA that will go do a complete pre-buy for you before you go outside. Call it an annual or what ever. Pay the guy what he asks to get a good job done. It's good insurance. Just make SURE he does not know or done work for the owner. Very important.

    Most important things are complete logs, engine and corrosion.
    For me the cosmetic held no sway compared to the mechanics of the craft.

    At first I was looking for planes with low total hours but realized if it has been maintained, it is not a major factor at all. Others may feel diff.

    Another thing to. A plane that has received some damage that has been repaired back to specs is ok. Don't let that bother you at all. However, it wld be a good idea to fly it, or have the A&P/IA do it and make sure it flies straight and true hands off. Mine had some damage and it flies perfectly. Of course best if no DH but remember there has been no AD or changes to the 180 structural frame since it was first introduced. That may be true for the 182 also.


    The pre-buy will give you some bargaining power. I was lucky as the owner was a good guy and honest.

    I was lucky in that I got to
    Coeur d'Alene while the annual was being done and got to do a good inspection for corrosion. I got to get to know the A&P there and he made me aware a seat rail needed replacement. The owner knocked off $500 for that.

    I turned it down but when in Seattle looking for an 182 the owner called me and accepted my offer which was $7500 less then he was asking. Plus , he flew it up here at his expense. After he got here the A&P here noticed it needed a exhaust pipe. So he knocked off abt $1200 for that and a new muffler. The baffles in the muffler had burnt out and caused the exhaust pipe to burn off on the flight up.

    It's a buyer's market and with the info from the pre-buy you'll think your a master dealer Ha!.

    2. I didn't do this but should have. Get the AOPA recs or one of the groups in Oklahoma to do a title search and make sure it is clear.


    3. There is a book by John Frank a moderator on the CPA web site (Cessna.org).
    Itís a buyers guide titled ď1956 thru 1986 Cessna 182 Fixed Gear Skylane Buyers GuideĒ. I got if after I had the 180 and recommend it highly.

    4. Are you already an ace conventional gear pilot. If not you may want to consider the 182 over the 180. I have lots of confidence with the tri-gear. Not so with the TW gear and am building that now. However, it takes time. If you want to really get to it after the plane gets here and not spend so much time, money on gas & a CFI learning, Iíd get a 182. I may still do that. Havenít decided yet.

    5. Try to decide what you want on the plane. I wanted the Sportsman STOL, the float kit and maybe the ski kit. The plane I bought has it all and you canít hardly stall it. It just mushes along or slowly drops while at the high AOA.

    6. If you want the ability to burn Mogas vs 100LL then better stick to a TCM 0-470. U model is 2000 TBO I think. Most others are 1500-hrs TBO.

    7. If you have a 182 with 8.5 x 10 tires or larger and the Sportsmans STOL kit you can pretty much land anywhere a TW will once you know the plane like the back of your hand. I plan to add VGs on the stabilizer and vertical tail.

    Whelp this is pretty long winded. I hope it helps you, and maybe others, in the quest to join the birds and explore the state like it aught to be seen. For me, thatís flying and fishing.
    Good Luck!.

    Rick


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