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Thread: Decreasing release mortality on halibut and lingcod

  1. #1
    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Default Decreasing release mortality on halibut and lingcod

    I see that the release mortality is very likley going to be counted in the allocation to the charter sector. I started looking around the internet and found that in some fisheries they require fish to be released without leaving the water. From that I found some commercial dehooking devices and went a head a bought one. I will report back on how it works. I guess it stands to reason, that if a fish is never lifted from the water, it is more likely to survive as it's slime coat is intact. In addition, like humans, I am sure fish would rather not have all their body weight hung from their jaw bone which is exactly what happens when we rail a 50 pound fish to unhook it.

    Here is the site: www.dehooker4arc.com
    or the exact model I got was:
    http://64.227.158.157/miva/merchant....ategory_Code=1

    I am looking at how these fisheries determined that the release mortality is being reduced. If it is viable for some fisheries maybe it will work for halibut and lingcod.

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    Default

    The toughest part of a release on a fish (except halibut) is the swim bladder expanding. Some of the slot limits on Lingcod have to be kiling more fish than the sportsmen are taking. That being said, I've been looking for their venting tool. Thanks for the heads up
    Last edited by capt.k; 03-04-2007 at 10:09. Reason: I lept without looking!

  3. #3

    Default lingcod

    Lings don't have swim bladders, either.
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

  4. #4
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default now lets require the commercial guys to release the same way...HAHAHAHAHAHA

    oh, i forgot...the have a de-hooker...oops, i mean bait stripper...no, no, that's a "line guide".
    gee, everyone else calls it a "crucifier".
    ever seen the incredible care that goes into releasing several hundred sub-legal halibut when a set is made in a chicken patch?
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Now now, Dave...let's not get into that all-too-popular habit of lumping all commercial fishermen into the same negative lot. We don't have a crucifier on our boat and I, as the one who runs the reel and picks the gear, take great care in releasing sub-legal halibut. We're not all evil, you know. Some of us actually care about the resource.

    -Brian

  6. #6

    Default

    I'll be very interested in what they base the hooking mortality on for Halibut. Ive been in on a Salmon study were we sport caught Salmon, held them in pens and documented mortality. I know of no study for sports caught Halibut, I would guess a very low number based on how hardy a fish they are and seeing hundreds with half their faces ripped off and healed over (from a crucifier). Hopefully they have some actual data based on sports caught fish and not someones best guess.
    Frank
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  7. #7
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default not lumping us all together...

    i always took as much care as possible when i was working the rail...and the skippers i worked for were pretty "green" as commercial guys go...but you gotta admit,some of the boats that have huge IFQ's probably are less than gentle.
    and how about the skates of gear lost every year?
    i have worked both sport and commercial, and my opinion is that there are enough fish for both user groups, and if that is not so, then BOTH groups should take a hit. if there are lots of fish, then BOTH groups should get more quota.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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  8. #8
    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Default dehooking vs crucifiying

    Dave,
    The idea of the dehooker is not to rip the hook out like a crucifier but to rotate the circle hook with this tool.
    When I was longlining I removed each hook by hand, carefully.

    Every boat is different but most are careful.

  9. #9
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default Akcapt

    you got me wrong...i was tongue-in-cheek there about the commercial "de-hooker", just pointing out how silly it would be to count released fish against the sport take unless a similar adjustment was made to the commercial quota.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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  10. #10

    Smile careful release

    Halibut are pretty forgiving. All you need is a gaff hook, or something like it. Hopefully, you have a line you can grab onto or you are wearing gloves. You sliide the gaff down the line until it is lying inside the curve of the hook. You have to hold the line downward while you life with the gaff. A little awkward, but it's very doable. Take me out sometime Captain, and I'll show you how!

    http://www.iphc.washington.edu/staff/stevek/basic2.htm



  11. #11
    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Default shakin um

    Oh I know how to get them off with the gaff hook.

    The problem is on my USCG inspected vessel the railings have to be 36" up from the deck which is in turn another 36" or so from the water, so I need to get down on my hands and knees and crawl under the railing to do that or hire an x NBA basketball player to shake the fish. I am thinking this thing will do exactly the same thing.

    I hate to see fish getting yarded in to the boat, flapping on the non skid deck and then tossed back in by the tail. My crew does no do this but I have seen hundereds of them released that way. I am sure it adds up.

  12. #12

    Default

    let me know how it works. I'm very interested.

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