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Thread: Best year for classic Wrangler style Jeeps?

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    Question Best year for classic Wrangler style Jeeps?

    What in your thoughts is the best year for the Jeep Wrangler style? This would include ease of maintenance, such as changing oil, etc. Looking to buy one here in Ohio and bringing it up with us in about a year. We are not thrilled about how much the super special oil for the Honda CRV is (0w20) and hope the Jeep line uses standard oils. Any thoughts and help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    If you're headed to Fairbanks you should be using synthetic in anything you drive... I'm using 0W30 Mobil 1 in my 94 Wrangler with great results and reliable cold starting.

    Back on topic... I much prefer the earlier CJs and the later TJs to the YJ series. I can't complain too much about mine considering what I paid for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    If you're headed to Fairbanks you should be using synthetic in anything you drive...
    I don't know.... I've lived here 20 years and never used synthetic in any of my rigs. Not that it's no good, just have never tried it. I don't do much driving though either.

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    This winter we saw 3 jeeps off the side of the freeway in the snow stuck, while our CRV had no problem. Two were Wrangler style and one I think a Liberty. My wife is worried they may be more prone to slide, etc. than the CRV. Thoughts? I don't remember seeing any CRVs off the road, but could have been bad drivers...

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    I've had a Jeep almost the entire time I've been up here. I drove my '99 TJ up from Nebraska 10 years ago. Now I own an '11 JK. I love my JK because it has 4 doors and all the bells and whistles, but I think price wise a '99 or '00 TJ Sport with the 4.0 inline 6 and a manual transmission is the way to go. Get a hard top model and look for one with cruise and I think you'd be set.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by THE_HUNTERIAM View Post
    This winter we saw 3 jeeps off the side of the freeway in the snow stuck, while our CRV had no problem... but could have been bad drivers...
    My YJ is somewhat squirrely in slick conditions in 2 wheel drive due to the short wheel base- no issues in 4wd though. Jeeps also appeal to a...uhh...more "youthful male" demographic that tends to have more wrecks and do more ditch diving than the populace at large in any weather condition but throw a layer of ice down and the "nut loose between the seat and wheel" becomes really apparent.

    Drive a Jeep like its a Jeep and not a sports car and you should have no issues.

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    Uhh for the money you will be saving on the oil you will be making up on the crappy gas mileage on the jeeps. Unless you get a 4cyclinder wrangler. I currently have 3 jeeps and none of themget more than 12 miles to the gallon. I have a 97 grand cherokee with 4.0L I6 a 00' Grand Cherokee with 4.7L V8 and a CJ 7 with a 350 V8 which is by far the worst on gas. I am sure the 37's and 3 speed dont help much either.

    So in essence your argument of the price of motor oil which is changed @ 3k-5k miles opposed to the high price of fuel up here that you will top off weekly if not more is kind of a moot point. ( I just filled up my grand from empty this morning @ 4.09 a gallon cost about 75 bucks.)

    edit: And if you do get a wrangler listen to kay9cop GET A HARD TOP. I had a soft top when I first got up here and @ -45 it is no fun you can have the heat blasting with little to no effect at least that was my personal expirence and if it did finally warm up inside you were already where you were going in the first place since you can get to one end of Fairbanks to the other in about 15 minutes tops.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bsj425 View Post
    edit: And if you do get a wrangler listen to kay9cop GET A HARD TOP..
    I would also heavily suggest a hard top as well. I've got an auxillary heater in my Jeep as well. The older models don't have a recirculation setting for the heater core- in essence heating cold outside air rather than heating warmer recirculated air. At -40F it just takes a long time to heat the cab that way.

    Mine has an aftermarket heater core/ fan unit between the front seats that greatly improves the cab heat- ie. it actually gets warm in the winter. Newer models with a recirc should be much better in that regard. If you get an older YJ or CJ, I would really suggest an auxillary heater.

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    Member Bsj425's Avatar
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    I just got a cigarette lighter power inverter and plugged in a space heater. It worked pretty well but not the best solution for long term.

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    Quote Originally Posted by THE_HUNTERIAM View Post
    What in your thoughts is the best year for the Jeep Wrangler style? This would include ease of maintenance, such as changing oil, etc. Looking to buy one here in Ohio and bringing it up with us in about a year. We are not thrilled about how much the super special oil for the Honda CRV is (0w20) and hope the Jeep line uses standard oils. Any thoughts and help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    I like the older CJ's, Scramblers, and Wagoneers as the greatest Jeeps ever made. The Wagoneer was a rugged rig with a Dana 44 front end and could be had with the old inline-six. I've done a bit of body off resto work on Lancruisers and currently have an old 87 FJ-60 with the inline six toyota. I prefer vehicles to be set up more like Safari (common sense) rigs for long range work on Alaskan gravel roads and not overdone with rediculously large tires when that money could be better invested towards gear or tools like boats/snowmachines. We aren't rock crawlers up here so it's best to stick with stock gears if possible. The older Landcruisers usually get 15-16 miles per gallon on a freshly rebuilt 2-barrel carb. The FJ-62 may even see 17-18 mpg with it's EFI set up.
    As far as Wranglers are concerned the 2003 TJ was a very good rig because it was the first year they went from a 3 speed to a 4 speed auto tranny with overdrive.

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    Member billy jack's Avatar
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    alaska_georgia 2009-2010-17.jpg Here's another vote on the Jeep Cherokee, that's me on the Haul Rd 38 miles south of the Arctic ocean, anout 22 mpg. Been driving Jeep's about 16 yrs now. CJ5 and Commander now. Cherokee's are not to be overlooked. Good luck
    It's a Jeep thing, you wouldn't understand.

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