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Thread: Whats the best warmest , strongest wall tent to live out an alaskan winter !

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    Default Whats the best warmest , strongest wall tent to live out an alaskan winter !

    hi which tent do alaskans prefer that would be the warmest & strongest wall tent to live out from fall to break-up ? also which stove has a ten hour or more heat put out before adding more fire wood ? is a 4 dog baffled stove the best for a wall tent ? advice much appreciated

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    Jeez are you serious......? If this is completely necessary go out in the Spring, build a cabin during the summer and don't risk your life to fabric. Not that a newbie isn't risking their life in a cabin in an Alaskan winter..... Look up the book/dvd 'Alone in the wilderness'.



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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM2K7sV-K74

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    Look, need4...
    What are your goals? Do you want to be alone to prove yourself? Are you interested in reliving the lifestyle of the past? Do you know where in AK you want to go?

    Sometimes the best way to experience something is a little at a time. Experience Alaska as a tourist. Work on getting your citizenship so you won't have to pay outrageous fees for licences and permits. Figure out just exactly what you want to accomplish. Talk to old timers.

    Many new comers (cheechakos, greenhorns) have come to AK and some have died because they did not know what they were getting into. Like that dumb kid in the bus.

    I would sure advise against a tent during the winter. Perhaps you could care-take someone's lodge and learn about the country over the winter. Lots of guys have done that. Arrange to work during the summer as a grunt, learn all you can, then stay on through the fall, winter and spring and experience an AK winter on a little safer terms. Perhaps then you will be ready to try things out for yourself the following winter with a whole lot better understanding of the country.

    I have to say at this juncture that Alaska may not be the romantic place you envision. Actually Canada has far more remote places that are probably more traditional. Maybe citizenship would not be the big issue there either.

    I'm not trying to discourage you, just help you. Many Alaskans will bend over backwards to help someone who wants to learn, but we are a bit resistant to people who approach things without caution because the north- even country not far from cities- can easily kill you.
    The smaller that government becomes, the bigger my support for it will be. The opposite is also true.

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    PS-
    If I was going to spend all winter in a tent, I would have two wall tents, one inside the other with a "Yukon stove" made from a drum. I'd have a good chainsaw with lots of fuel, a "grubstake" of staples, and a third plan B tent with extra stuff in case something goes wrong (like a fire).
    The smaller that government becomes, the bigger my support for it will be. The opposite is also true.

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    The warmest most effective tent with 4 walls in Alaska is the perverbial stick built stucture (can't really call most of them houses) left unfinished wrapped in Tyvek. Hey, most of them look like tents and even have blue tarps for a roof. They are pretty popular in lots of remote residential areas. They can be built very very little expense by using keen scavaging skills and having a wide imagination. You can put as many dogs as you want in your stove, but you may have to experiment with different breeds. Usually cuddling with 3 or 4 of them will keep you warm through the winter. Sorry for being such a smart ass, but there is quite a bit of truth/irony to this post.

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    You should pay close attention to the warnings everyone has posted. With that said; look at the tents made by Alaska Tent & Tarp. We've used the Arctic Oven and it's toasty at any temperature.

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    Thanks for advice guys & sayak im from scotland its nearly as cold as alaska & it has exact same terrain except its a small country with to mant people . i know alot about alaska iv studied it 3 yrs , weather , thin ice, over flow & even sun /moon dogs not to forget bears . id luv to head sum where north of fort yukon maybe the sheenjek mounting & wolf country. canada aint for me to many national parks but thanks for sharing ur knowledge sayak as am not saying i know it all ! two barrier`s for me is how to make a trapping circuite although i know about trapping cubby, leg holds, pole setts, pea post etc . im not that dumb kid i would be prepared with supplies & a 4 dog wuld keep me toasti too. with an extra tarp & insulation over my main tent you see iv got alot bush craft skills but deffo need a helping hand on sumthings 1st befor i go. do like the lodge idea though to start with thats positve advice but id rather have some one go with me trapp & hunt for yr or alone. i was brought up in the rugged hills off scotland Geo

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    seen all the dvds & books akiiceman im not an ameture iv had shot guns an excellent shot to & also iv won fishing competions . i dont know why we`v got onto all this iv just asked for the best wall tents but find your conversations interesting on sum points
    Quote Originally Posted by akiceman25 View Post
    Jeez are you serious......? If this is completely necessary go out in the Spring, build a cabin during the summer and don't risk your life to fabric. Not that a newbie isn't risking their life in a cabin in an Alaskan winter..... Look up the book/dvd 'Alone in the wilderness'.



    -akiceman25

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    thanks kelvin il check out alaska tent & tarp . p.s i know alaska studied it long enough & im tuff fa scots lad laughing out loud

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    Thanks chico herd off them actually forgot tut tut , herd their very good do you think they are better or warmer in winter than wall tents ? you ever heard off the (wilderness wall tent) from wall tent shop.com ? it sounds a good one what iv read but would like to hear from any one who has actually used it in winter in alaska ?

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    Default winter tents

    I have spent winters in Alaska in a tent before. I used military tents. 6 man military tent with a single pole was the best. With an arctic liner. Pallet floor. Wood or oil heater, (best to have both). It has about 36 tie down ropes. But I think the best tent has already been mentioned, the arctic oven. These are used on both the polar caps. 8 man is about $2,000. Here is the link
    http://www.alaskatent.com/oven.html

    10 man military tent below:


    Arctic oven:

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    wow hey thanks Auen1 thats was kind of you to do upload the photos & now i see it, it reminds me of the one heimo korth is using in far out vid which can be viewed on utube. thiers no doubt it looks warm & cosy but that military one looks a real tough one to. Think theirs sumthing about the wall tent i like though because its shaped like a cabin , good standing room espc when u put willow 8ft branches over the ridge making lots head room & its spacious aswell as light in side with a back window. plus you can throw a tarp over or do what the native indians did build a tempory log wall around it which i think is great idea helping to keep it warmer so il stick to the traditional wall tent. would like to hear about that (wilderness tent) from wall tent.com

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    Member akiceman25's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by need4wilderness View Post
    seen all the dvds & books akiiceman im not an ameture iv had shot guns an excellent shot to & also iv won fishing competions . i dont know why we`v got onto all this iv just asked for the best wall tents but find your conversations interesting on sum points

    'we've gotten onto all this' out of concern for my felllow human beings. Due to your screen name, low post count on this forum and type of question you asked in your original thread it led me, and I'm sure many others, to believe you had little experience with the Alaskan wilderness. We've seen/heard what happens to those types. I stand by my previous statement, a cabin would not only be safer for you but would give you a sense of accomplishment to building it also.

    Prepare well my friend...and enjoy!

    -akiceman25

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    On-topic:
    The problem with tents, especially military wall tents, is that they should not be left unattended for any length of time. The tie downs need to be tightened or loosened all the time. When a canvas wall tent gets wet, it shrinks, which makes the ropes to tight. When it blows, the ropes will loosen, causing the tent to flap in the wind. And repair kit is necessary. A sewing kit and extra canvas. Below is the tent that I spend the summer in. (from mid-May through mid-Oct). It's sweet, 16 feet by 30 feet. BTW The reason I live outdoors is work related and is 70 miles out of town and 10 miles off the road system.




    Off-topic:
    Everyone here has giving you excellent advice. BUT contrary to the impression that some make here,
    1) Winter camping is not rare in Alaska. It is common from the far north arctic down to the southern tip of Alaska. Ask any local that lives in a remote village and survives for a good part, from subsistence off the land. They live in tents all the time, w/o complaining about the discomforts.
    2) Everyone who camps in the winter, regardless of experience, does not die. Probably 99% live. The few video examples in previous posts, are extreme. It's like watching a fatal car crash on tv, and then discourage everyone not to drive.

    The best advice I could give,
    1) Is to be prepared for everything and anything that could go wrong.
    2) Arrive in Alaska in mid-May or early June. There is still plenty of cold, crappy weather, to get your fill.
    3) If you must camp through the winter, have a satellite locator beacon. In Alaska, things can go wrong in a blink of an eye. And often, it goes from bad to worse just as fast. Link:http://www.findmespot.com/en/
    4) The nice thing about most of Alaska, is that a 5-30 minute drive out of town, you can be in the middle of nowhere. Anchorage and Fairbanks, you might have to go a little farther. It's nice to be close to food, help, hot showers, hostels, etc...

    If you are the kind of person that says something and then does it, GO FOR IT.
    Funny how no one has posted a comment like "I went camping in the winter and froze my butt off. It wasn't very much fun." That would be my comment.
    Just my two cents and good luck.

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    Member akiceman25's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Auen1 View Post
    The few video examples in previous posts, are extreme.
    The video I was referring to is about Dick Proenekke. An amazing guy who built his own cabin and lived in it for MANY years..... just supporting my post. In this video it shows him building his cabin and how he lived for so long in the bush.... pretty good reference I thought.

    -akiceman25


    http://www.dickproenneke.com/

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    Thanks Auen1 yh as you said its in the preparation. your feed back to me was really positive i.e- satellite locator beam good idea il be taking one off these now you mention it thanks , this is the advice i want to hear & yh plenty take good tents & stoves , its like evry thing else be carefull & prepared - stay warm be fine!

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    @ AKICEMAN25
    Sorry, was not referring to your post. Need for wilderness has a few threads, asking for advice. Many posters offer discouragement. I probably got a little mixed up in the threads,

    I love the vid you posted. Thanks for the link. I've been waiting to watch it again. That guy is amazing and has a great story.

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    Thanks auen1 for that link iv now found the right tent im looking for the 13oz dlx sunforger thats the one bro thanks again your a star. G

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    Quote Originally Posted by akiceman25 View Post
    The video I was referring to is about Dick Proenekke. An amazing guy who built his own cabin and lived in it for MANY years..... just supporting my post. In this video it shows him building his cabin and how he lived for so long in the bush.... pretty good reference I thought.

    -akiceman25


    http://www.dickproenneke.com/
    You are right. One of my favorites, thanks for reminding me. BTW I'm pretty sure he (Dick Proenekke) was the only cameraman. Here are the first 15 minutes. I'll upload the other three parts as time allows. Sorry if it comes out a little choppy, it a huge upload. (Over 4 Gb for the whole movie) And it's my first time uploading to youtube. Stay tuned.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Auen1 View Post
    You are right. One of my favorites, thanks for reminding me. BTW I'm pretty sure he (Dick Proenekke) was the only cameraman. Here are the first 15 minutes. I'll upload the other three parts as time allows. Sorry if it comes out a little choppy, it a huge upload. (Over 4 Gb for the whole movie) And it's my first time uploading to youtube. Stay tuned.

    You're very welcome. He was quite the man. I've watched his videos dozens of times.... And learned a bunch. And now I can watch from my smartphone! Much appreciated!

    -akiceman25
    I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM2K7sV-K74

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