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Thread: Float hunting on a lake?

  1. #1
    Member kingman's Avatar
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    Default Float hunting on a lake?

    I've been wanting to float hunt since I moved to Alaska. My buddy with a boat says he wants to head out on the Lakes on the Kenai. I have two questions about this decision. First one being is there good hunting on the Kenai lakes? Second being if so what lakes? At this point I just want to get the most bang for my buck... Thanks

  2. #2

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    the kenai lakes are big water, expect high winds and more people than you'd want for secluded hunt. It's hard to cover shorelines because of people that time of year. Wind fetch is scary if timing is bad (weather dependent).

    lb

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    King,

    Which lakes are you referring to in particular? There is a lot of variation on the Kenai Peninsula; some lakes are very small, some are huge and fed by glaciers that even create localized weather patterns (I'm thinking of Skilak and Tustemena in particular)... huge differences between the many lakes out there. Also you didn't say what species you're hunting.

    Can you provide more specifics?

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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    Member kingman's Avatar
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    Yeah we are going for black bear. And as far as lakes go... Thats what I am wondering. Which lakes! Big or small at this point. He has a good boat that could feed either or. Any inputs at this point are greatly appreciated. -Matt

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    What kind of boat?

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    Member Mark Collett's Avatar
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    Default How about this unit

    600.JPGI have used this kayak to hunt bear and elk off tidewater in Washington.Seems animals do not expect danger from the water.Plus it is very quiet.

  7. #7
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Okay, most of the lakes on the Kenai Peninsula are located in forested country. This means that you have trees running right up to the shoreline areas in most places. In other words, visibility of the surrounding areas is poor. And there is really nothing along the shoreline areas to attract the attention of a bear. The only exception that comes to mind might be Skilak Lake, which hosts several salmon runs. I suppose it could be possible to find a bear wandering the shoreline late in the fall, but I would not expect to find bears in any appreciable numbers. Certainly nothing that would provide the basis of a hunt. Much better options out there for black bears than a lake-based hunt.

    That said, some of the lakes out there could provide access to areas where you could park and hike through the timber, and make your way up above treeline to alpine berry patches and such. This is where you are most likely to find bears in the fall. In the spring and summer, they move down into the flats where they are nearly impossible to find (because of the vegetation).

    My best advice is to get some 1:63,360-scale USGS topo maps of the area in question, and take those maps to the Federal building in downtown Anchorage (it's where the court house is). Go to the fourth floor and ask to see the color infrared photos of the area you are looking at. These will show you where those berry patches are that are closest to the lake. It would take a while to explain the whole deal on the CIR photos, but they're a great tool you should learn (if you don't know already).

    If I were hunting black bears on the Kenai Penn., my most likely course of action would be to glass the hillsides from the shore and make a plan from there, once a bear is spotted. Trail Lake offers some opportunities like that, and it's on the road system.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  8. #8

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    Hunt Skilak, Hidden, Kenai, Cooper, or Trail lakes. Glass the south facing slopes and watch the beaches, especially first and last hours of daylight. Go the last week of May. Slow troll for lake trout while glassing, and leave a line in overnight while you are camping. They are numerous, delicious and they eat a lot of salmon.

    Another option is a float on the upper Kenai River, or hike in to the Russian lakes, Juneau lake or up Skyline trail. All those areas hold lots of bears. Good luck.

  9. #9
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Be sure to check the hunting regs carefully. The Upper Kenai from Jim's Landing down to Skilak is part of the Skilak Loop Management Area and is closed to big-game hunting. Parts of the Russian River system are closed in June-July, etc. There are lots of lines on the maps down that way, and you don't want to end up on the wrong side of one of them! Check it out, and if you're in doubt, give the ADFG office in Soldotna a call. Talk to Jeff Selinger, one of the ADF&G biologists assigned to that area. He can fill you in on the many opportunities down that way. His number is 1 (907) 262-9368.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  10. #10

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    Right. Scratch Hidden Lake from the list and know where the line is on Skilak. I forgot about the "new" rules out there. When I was a kid, that loop road produced many moose and black bears... I've noticed guys are working that area across the highway from the East end of Skilak Loop near the power line for black bears almost every day. Might want to give them some room, I think they might have a bait station there.

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