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Thread: bipods?

  1. #1
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Default bipods?

    Trying to decide on a bipod but am unable to. I want one that attaches to the sling swivel but still allows me to mount the sling at the same time.

    What are you all using and what have you liked disliked about yours?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    harris tilt or versapod. I like the harris, kinda heavy and the springs can pick up some debris, but overall it is a good setup, I have not personally used the versapod, but a buddy of mine teaches sniper school and swears by versapod, I know harris is good, heard versa pod is better...I am ok with good.

    get one that covers the heights you want, if you are shooting off the hood it will need to be alot shorter then one for shooting in snow/brush, either way spend the extra bux on the tilt option

  3. #3

    Default

    You didn't ask for this info, but I gotta pipe up. I really hate the way bipods feel on a gun, especially for offhand shooting, though I've tried and tried to get used to them.

    Finally did some range testing, and I can be virtually as steady as with a bipod when using a walking stick or trekking pole, whether prone, sitting, kneeling or offhand. For example, when sitting just use your forend hand to grab the walking stick at the righ height with a couple of fingers while resting your elbows as usual. ROCK solid! You can use it the same way offhand too, for amazing gains, something you can't do with almost any bipod you would want hanging from your rifle.

    I finally sold off both bipods I tried, eliminating weight on the rifle while not giving up anything in accuracy. YMMV, but try some kind of walking stick or broomstick as an experiment before investing in the bipod. Put the money you save into ammo for practice, and I bet you'll be way ahead over buying the bipod.

  4. #4
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    We carry shooting sticks that connect together like tent poles and are long enough to permit standing shots yet they can be carried in the backpack. For us they are much more verstile than bipods.
    Tennessee

  5. #5

    Talking monopod

    I find an adjustable monopod as steady as any of the pods out there, with only one leg to adjust. This is a benefit on uneven terrain, and when one finds that sweet spot for themselves, that particular height will suffice for 98% of all your shooting, plus you have the advantage of a walking stick and helps as a third leg in rocky and broken terrain. In brushy terrain, their worth their weight in gold. A bipod on rifle stock is so limited where one can use it and if you ever use a good monopod (like Stoney Point) once, you'll never go without it. I rate mine in importance...above my rifle. All I had to do was to remember back to all the lost opportunities I've had because of not being able to fine a suitable, steady rest, to convince me to use one.

  6. #6
    Member AKRoadkill's Avatar
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    I have Harris and Versa-Pods. Of the two, I prefer the Versa-Pods. There's more range of motion, and you can switch them out easier if yuo hab\ve the mounts on different rifles.

    I've shot as groups off the bipods (both brands) as good as any I've shot with bags on a bench..to include a .270" 3 shot hole with my AR-15 at 200 yards. Yep...just over a quarter inch at 200 yards. That was from a short Versa-Pod, prone, with a rear bag.

  7. #7
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for all the input. I was thinking of using the bipod for my daughters not really for myself. just thought it would be a bit easier for them to get in a comfortable prone position in the field with a bipod than trying to find a log or use their elbows. Now you all have me thinking about a monopod for myself and my wife. They sound like a great idea. Never had a problem taking offhand shots, but then again never took one over 100 yds. One more thing to add to my list of wants.

    Rob

  8. #8

    Default

    I built my own shooting sticks with some carbon arrow shafts about 12"long and some easton aluminum shafts for the joints about 3" long, tent pole shock cord to hold them together and a bit of surgical tubing to keep the stick together and to make a loop to slide over the area your gun would go to keep it from making noise, they are glued with gorilla glue and have 3 seasons on them, weight is about the same as 3 carbon arrows.....1-2oz. and they are sectioned so you can fold them and put them in your pocket/pack. they work really well for me, prolly not the hot ticket for a kid, but a competent shooter would enjoy them for sure

  9. #9
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maydog View Post
    I find an adjustable monopod as steady as any of the pods out there, with only one leg to adjust. This is a benefit on uneven terrain, and when one finds that sweet spot for themselves, that particular height will suffice for 98% of all your shooting, plus you have the advantage of a walking stick and helps as a third leg in rocky and broken terrain. In brushy terrain, their worth their weight in gold. A bipod on rifle stock is so limited where one can use it and if you ever use a good monopod (like Stoney Point) once, you'll never go without it.......
    I have a Harris bipod mounted on a 300 Win Mag that I never use, and a B-Square bipod mounted on yet another 300 Win Mag I never use. As has been noted above, the Harris is bulky. The B-Square is much lighter, but isn't as easy to use as the Harris.

    I think Maydog is right on the money here. I've never carried a monopod before, simply because I felt that carrying more crap was the last thing I needed, especially carrying it in my hand.

    But I'm certain he's right about it's ease of use in tough terrain as a shooting aid. The bipods are set up for prone shots, and if you're lucky, a sitting shot.

    Period.

    I'm going to have to look into them. Thanks for that tip on the Stoney Point..........

  10. #10

    Talking New tricks

    I would have argued till he** froze over if someone would have suggested a monopod to me, that it was just unneccesary crap to lug around and I was so stubborn that in my mind, there was nothing out there that could enhance my hunting prowess because I took pride in being on the cutting edge of effeciency. Man was I wrong. After getting one to use on an antelope hunt two years ago, I couldn't believe how great and versatile it is, and I rate it as one of my most important pieces of equipmet I own...I'd feel lost without it, especially as a walking stick. I would recommend the strong aluminum adjustable (from 25" to 63") instead of the less expensive plastic ones. Stoney Point is well worth the extra money...great quality and almost indestructible. I guess an ol dog can learn a new trick.

  11. #11
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    Default bipods/monopods

    I've found that for free standing, especially moose hunting or bear hunting in the back neck woods, just find a tree, put your left hand on it sticking your thumb out, rest your rifle on your thumb, and you got yourself as stable shooting platform as any monopod can give you, plus you dont have to worry about the tree moving! Heck i use that same strategy in Iraq right now...just find a corner of a building and shoot off your hand.

  12. #12

    Talking tree & buildings

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskanDan View Post
    I've found that for free standing, especially moose hunting or bear hunting in the back neck woods, just find a tree, put your left hand on it sticking your thumb out, rest your rifle on your thumb, and you got yourself as stable shooting platform as any monopod can give you, plus you dont have to worry about the tree moving! Heck i use that same strategy in Iraq right now...just find a corner of a building and shoot off your hand.
    You're right there...makes great rests...IF there's a tree or a building around. And if there isn't, just tell the critter to stand there till you get to one, and if the tree is small enough, it could serve as a walking staff. You're definitely hunting in a little different terrain in Iraq than most of us do here. But on the serious side...you stay safe over there and shoot straight, no matter what, ok?Best of all to you and your Buddies!

  13. #13

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    I use a B-square bipod, it works well.

  14. #14
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    Default

    about 99% of the hunting i do is in the wooded areas, so i'm good! Thanks for your support, we sure need it!

  15. #15
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default

    I also use a walking stick with a shooting cradle(monopod)

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