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Thread: Wall Tents

  1. #1

    Default Wall Tents

    Hey all. I am interested in getting a wall tent mainly for moose hunting in the interior. It might see some other duties such as extended fish trips or such, who knows. I have noticed with a lot of other posts that people are recommending other styles of tents (nylon type). Are wall tents not the way to go? Are the other styles of tents a better deal?
    Also if you are in favor of wall tents what are your recommendations as far as size, weight of material, where to buy, or any thing else you can think of?
    Thanks for the help.

  2. #2
    Member 4x4's Avatar
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    DeerHunter; Im all about the walltent,Ive been useing the 8x10,10oz,FR,With the little pack stove,Since Back in around 1993-ish or so?Maybe not the best choice for out in the wide open area's,I usually set mine up in a little protection,Trees,Alders & such,Also made a sweet internal frame for mine useing(GREY)1"schedule #40.PVC tubeing,With 1"schedule #80.PVC.elbows,T's,Etc. No bottom in this tent, blue tarp,or ? works good for this as well as over the top,I ran my stove pipe out the side,Stays toasty! 2-people easy,maybe-3? Have mainley used mine on kodiak island deer hunts,This year(2007) its go'n on spring kodiak bear & fall kodiak mt.goat hunt's! Dont think i want to give up the draw areas just yet! he,he,he...

  3. #3

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    let me start with I have never used a wall tent, bit it mine or another, in the interior.

    I did some pretty hard reasearch on wall type tents a few years ago and what I found is: if you are going to use a canvas type wall tent, space and weight can't be a concern they are heavy and bulky, it is best to have a place to spread them out at home cause they are going to take a while to dry out, if you don't dry it, it will mold. buy the best material you can afford, it is not much cost difference for a lot of life difference. cotton/duck tents are durable and easy to work on, not too bad to pitch and their frames can often be made in the field if you can find the right materials.

    After searching and talking to outfitters in wa, id, mt I personally settled on the alaknak 12x12. I have the vestibule and roof liner as well as a stove. all of that will just barely fit in a 120qt cooler and weigh at least 110lbs.....prolly more just a guess, I find my tent to be very easy to pitch, the first time in the field was about 20-25 mins and I am down to 5-10 now. I really like the floor, a budd has the same exact tent, we camped on the gooiest ground, my partner decided to put a tarp under his tent, I did not, it rained for a week straight and his tarp litterally had water running under his tent, you could see it inside.....wierd, it was like walking on a waterbed, but neither leaked a drop.

    on that trip it rained nonstop, and hard, not too windy, but the kind of rain that makes you want to start pairing up critters for the ride on the ark, temps were around 35* we dried our clothes every nigh by the fire and they were always toasty, inside the tent it varried from 60-80* depending on the stove damper, condensation build up did occur, but was minimal enough that a single hand towel could gather it all, it was nothing really. I was very impressed and do not regret buying this tent at all, it is not canvas, but instead a synthetic fabric that is supposed to be sun resistant and water proof, I buy the water proof, we'll see on the sun thing, mine has only seen about 50 days in the field so far. the biggest bonus for me is the floor, no tarps just a sewn in floor.

  4. #4
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    Default wall tents.......

    I bought a wall tent from Davis Tent and Awning out of Denver,Colorado.....14x16....chimney hole....front and back doors<screened>...3- 24x30 screened windows.....mildew,fire,waterproof,..excellent ..!!!
    Bulky and akward for a few days...awesome for longer....they get warm and stay that way with a fire going and get cold without..hahha...I love them..like being home w/out the nagging...lol.....the folks at Davis were awesome and helpful.....

    Boomer.

  5. #5

    Default Wall tents

    I have used Montana Tent and Canvas wall tents for many years on moose hunts. The material I chose for my wall tent was their Realite. I also have their frame. It is a 12' by 17' model with out a floor. I had extra windows and another screened door put in it and it is tan colored. White is the best color though as the tent is much brighter inside. I also have an older 12' by 12' Alaknak that they no longer make. If it is me and one other person on the hunt I take it. These tents are best when stuck in the timber. A big wind could blow them over as my friend found out when he pitched his on the big river bed we some times hunt. If his wood stove had been going he could have come back to a burnt up mess. These tents are much lighter then canvas and have worked out very well. Cabela's sells their products. Go big on the tent if you can haul it!
    Last edited by .338 mag.; 03-03-2007 at 11:13. Reason: spelling

  6. #6

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    I went the traditional route a lot of years ago, getting an AT&T 12x14' canvas, separate floor, collapsible metal ridge pole and end poles, and stove. All told close to 200# if you want to stick it on a plane. Worth every pound when you are in places you need it.

    It's still going strong because of one thing: I DRY IT COMPLETELY after each use. If you don't have a heated space big enough for that, I'd recommend you find some other fabric than canvas.

    Here's a neat stunt if you want a frame (what I did). Wait till Costco or someone has those portable canvas "carport" thingies for sale, usually less than $150. Make sure it's at least as big as your wall tent, if not bigger. Do whatever you want with the canvas cover, but shorten the legs and the three roof poles if necessary to fit your wall tent. Best $12 I ever spent.

    Did I say $12? Yup. Found mine NIB at a garage sale.

  7. #7
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    If weight is a factor, check out these guys:
    http://www.titaniumgoat.com/tents.html

    I've used a Vertex 6 Ti-Goat tent with titanium stove and they are light and practical for fall hunting, a bit on the chilly side during winter.

    Heading out tomorrow with our AT&T standard 10oz. 8'x10' wall tent for some mushing/camping. Finally warmed up here to -42 so shouldn't be too bad out there <grin> as long as we bowsaw lots of wood.

    Wall tents are a bit overkill for most hunts unless weight and bulk isn't an issue. Also check out fourdog stoves; they make a nice titanium stove that is super lightweight for its size, but a bit spendy.

  8. #8
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    I hunt in the interior, and have used both taffeta nylon and canvas (Wall) tents through the years. Now I use a wall tent, and a small nylon tent as backup, just in case i have to sleep away from the campsite for a night or two. However, I haven't had to sleep away from my comfortable tent for years .

    I prefer wall tents because I can stand and move around, and because the walls don't allow air to pass through as much as a nylon wall does. Once the tent is warm inside, a small heater can keep it warm enough with ease. A problem with wall tents is weight and bulk. Also, if you don't have a water-resistant floor for it, moisture builds up inside unless you can ventilate it well.

    What I did was as follows: I purchased an 8"x10" canvas tent (not treated) when on sale at Big Ray's. It cost somewhere around $250.00. However, it had no zipper on the door, not a window on the back wall, no bug screen, and no floor. I sewed/glued a triangular screened window on the back wall, a zipper on the door, and also sewed/glued a zippered screen door. Then I purchased a few yards of treated canvas over at Tent & Tarp, and sewed an 8" x 10" floor for it, but didn't sewed it to the tent. The next step was to treat the roof with a water-proofer chemical that proved to be extremely stinky for months. The total cost, minus labor time, was around $370.00 to $460.00 or so.

    Then I purchased a set of nine aluminum adjustable frame angles for it, and that alone cost $170.00 at Tent & Tarp, followed by a whole bunch of 2" conduit (pipes) at Home Depot for $112.00 or so. I cut a frame to size, and then lifted the tent over the frame. Now I rolled the canvas floor down, over an 8" x 10" tarp for added moisture protection. By now I had spent around $700.00 plus a great number of work hours on this tent.
    ------------
    Now, I could have gone to Tent & Tarp and asked them to build an 8x10 wall ten (they use treated canvas) with 4' side walls for added height, with a back-screened window, zippered door, and zippered screen door. The cost would have been around $500.00-$600.00, minus a whole bunch of hours of sewing, gluing, and treating. Then I could have purchased an 8x10 canvas tarp from Northern Tools for the floor, and skipped the frame all together (will explain later).
    --------
    Look at the photo of my tent: You will notice an A-Frame built from local lumber. With the A-Frame I need no metallic frame in the tent. All i have to do if I want is to run two 11' (or so) pieces of lumber tied to each A-Frame, 4' high. Then I can tie the tent's eaves or side walls to the two lumber pieces to hold the walls UP. The ridge can be held UP by running a ridge pole inside the tent, which in turn is tied with two ropes from each ridge-pole's end piece sticking out the tent's ends, and up to the A-Frame's ridge over the tent.
    ----
    Notice how I keep my tent dry during moose season? I am also using the metallic frame this time. However, I use an ATV with a meat trailer to take all the heavy gear to my campsite
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
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    What i plan to do this year is to build a 2"x4" slightly smaller than 8' 10' structure or building, without roof, doors, and walls, but with a floor. This way I can just lift the tent over the 2 x 4 frame, and that will be my home-away-from-home place during moose season. I heat my tent with a Mr. Heater that has an oxygen-depletion sensor for safety.

  10. #10

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    I have a trick for drying our my alaknak, should work for any tent that is pretty air tight.

    I open it up when I get home and find the door, I put a big box fan in the door opening and fire it up, the air expands the tent inside the hous/garage and the air movement dries it out really quick....works good.

    I heard a comment about the nylon not stopping the wind, I can say that it does not apply to cabelas fabric, it is water and wind proof, they actually add vents and windows to help it breathe.

  11. #11
    Member 4x4's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    RayfromAk: Very impressive! Now i kinda feel like a boyscout in comparison to what you have done with your setup, Impressive indeed! Nice job!

  12. #12
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    Default Wall tents

    Wall tent with a wood stove is the way to go for me. The little extra weight is well worth it. BC

  13. #13

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    Thanks for the help. I think I am going to go with the wall tent. Now i just have to determine how big of a tent I need.

  14. #14

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    I have the 12x14 bighorn 2 from cabela's. I bought the vestibule with all the options, and I love it.

  15. #15
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    Default Wall tent

    A 10'x12' is a good size for 2-3 guys....Perfect for 2. Weighs around 40 lbs. Stove weighs around 18-20 lbs. I always cut my own poles. BC

  16. #16

    Wink wall tents

    The wall tent is definately a great way to go. Especially if you don't want to be limited on where you can go with a 4 wheeler or truck. Camp trailers are ok for some people but then again you can't just go anywhere. I have a montana canvas tent (12x14) and love it. I have never used it in alaska but here in idaho it is really nice for those 7-10 day fall elk hunts. I can camp anywhere I can get my truck or atv and keep pleanty warm in the process. Only drawback for me is mine is bulky and heavy. I have a square stove that I like better than the round ones for ease of cleaning IMO. I do hate the stupid spark arrester though! Pieces of crap!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)

  17. #17

    Default Wall tent

    i have a 14x16 built by alaska tent and tarp. We've used it on the slope during hunting season in high winds without any trouble. If your worried about the wind go to lowes or home depot and pick up some concrete spikes. Their only a couple bucks and make the strongest tent spike I've used. If weight is an issue take along some empty burlap bags.
    Dig a hole where you need the tiedown using the dirt or gravel to fill the beg. Tie the tent to the bag then drop it in the hole. Works great.

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