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Thread: fox float shocks bad? how to tell?

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default fox float shocks bad? how to tell?

    on my M8 under my track i've got a fox float shock, how do i tell if it needs a rebuild or is gettin bad? i'm pumped up to about 140lbs and it don't hold the machine up, it squats a little but not all the way, maybe a quarter of the way. if i push down on the tunnel it soaks it up and bounces back a bit but not all the way....
    it don't bottom out though.
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    How to tell if Fox Floats are bad? If it says Fox Float on the side? They suck. :-)

    Don't you have some real springs under that skid? It sounds like you need to dial them up.

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    the front shock has spring over it, back shock is a fox float.
    would tightening the front one up actually help to hold up the back end of a saggy sled?
    it just don't feel like the float is grabbin' anything until the very bottom.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    on my M8 under my track i've got a fox float shock, how do i tell if it needs a rebuild or is gettin bad? i'm pumped up to about 140lbs and it don't hold the machine up, it squats a little but not all the way, maybe a quarter of the way. if i push down on the tunnel it soaks it up and bounces back a bit but not all the way....
    it don't bottom out though.
    I would pull it out to check it. 140 PSI is way up there, most times you should only need about 75, 100 max.

    I can not remember the exact travel spec on that skid shock but it should be about a 1/2" to 1 inch from full extension as I remember it. When they lose air they are flat and you can tell in a hurry.

    I have machines with standard shocks, Sno Pro Setup w/ triple rate springs, and the Fox Floats. Overall I like both my triple rates and the floats about the same. The big difference is I had my triple rates extended for more travel but have had little problem with my floats. I did go flat on a real cold morning but have since changed to using nitrogen and they seem to work better.

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    I do not familiarize myself with Cats but I've never seen a sled that used shock preload to control suspension height or sag. That is a function of the main springs. Are Cats dependent on air shocks to set ride height?

    A "bad" shock usually means it's lost dampening capability. If your air shocks are holding 140psi then what exactly would allow excessive sag?

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    i guess it just don't hold the tunnel up..if i pick up on the bumber i lift the machine about 5 inch or so before i actaully start lifting track...don't recal it being like that before...machines at the dealship are held up and tight as soon as you put weight on them. mine you can lift the tunnel and let go and it'll sink a ways down before the shock catches it.
    From what i'm hearing from guys 1900 miles is about right for a fox float to be "broke in" and need a rebuild..every year they recommend.
    woulda been good to know when i bought it that i need about 300 in rebuilds each year on my suspension...
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    From what i'm hearing from guys 1900 miles is about right for a fox float to be "broke in" and need a rebuild..every year they recommend.
    woulda been good to know when i bought it that i need about 300 in rebuilds each year on my suspension...

    Not true....I have a sled with many miles and many years on it's Fox Floats with only one overhaul.

    This is the rear skid shock correct? You may have blown a seal. Having about 5" of travel before it engages sounds like you are low on oil in the shock and regardless of how much air you add it will not raise the rear. Also make sure you are on flat ground, nothing under the track. I had a sled dropped off because of the same issue to find that when I put it flat on the floor we found no issue.

    Man I wish I could get free and get up there to ride with you and Kyle. I need to get at Dean's sled and find out why he blew that new belt a couple of weeks ago.

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    if ur not racing it or huckin it big they hold up really well, but all my shocks i try get rebuilt after bout the first couple hundred miles to get the break in oil outta there, i'd definitly get some better valving in those fox floats, but they are very good capable shocks onced valved right, 140 is way high up there on the air pressure, anyways good luck... most of us that i ride with rebuild our shocks every 500-1000 miles, but we all need top performance at all times... floats are pretty similar to regular ifp shocks except the air works as a spring which really makes them very progressive so can even run em not pumped up all that high and resist bottoming pretty well, i've heard the stock valving on those float skid shocks suck a big one, so i'd try some different valving and rebuild em and run some good 3 or 5 weight racing oil in em... floats get a bad rap cuz peeps don't know what to do with em, i've raced with floats and they held up really well in all temps and have lasted as long as any coilover i ran, i do however prefer a coil over with resevoirs and big shafts, a good shock guy should be able to dial those in good for you, also fox racing department sells a chris burandt valving package for the rear skid on that m8 and heard that's the ticket... good luck... 1800-fox-shox

    fox racing on the burand kit-
    "The Chris Burandt Backcountry Kit will turn your Arctic Cat M series sled into a mogul soaking, trail taming machine. In addition to the added plush feel on the trail, our special valving will help get your sled on top of the snow with its improved weight transfer characteristics."

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dupont Spinner View Post
    Also make sure you are on flat ground, nothing under the track. I had a sled dropped off because of the same issue to find that when I put it flat on the floor we found no issue...
    I've heard that shop dollys are a shock rebuilders dream!

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    Cool cal shocks is the best place to get them rebuild. Myslef I throw then away and buy different shocks floats suck. Look at race sleds there a reason why no one runs them..

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    To say 'they suck' seems like a ill-informed statement.

    Everything is purpose built. Obviously they aren't built for racing and don't perform to a race specification. They are very lightweight and if used properly (Dupont Spinner can attest to this), they last a very long time. I'd venture to say that most who say they suck either haven't used them that much, or have heard from a friend of a friend who had 'em, or someone botched the rebuild or something.

    I'd say industry professionals (people who live and breathe this stuff), wouldn't put these on their OEM sleds off the assembly line if they didn't work. They aren't that new and they are still featured on many sleds on the showroom floor....

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    Saddle time led me to my opinion stated earlier.

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    i moved my sled and drove it a hundred yards and the shock is workin' fine. been sitting for 3 days and still holding great...not sure what the deal was. i've got one more hunt to do on the sled and then i'll have them reworked over the summer and be ready for next season. if i play my cards right...or the bears play them right i should say i might break 3000 miles on my NEW sled....ahhhh good times.
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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Just a gee-whiz on most basic shocks: If you've just racked up a bunch of hard, rough miles of whooped out trail and suddenly your rear suspension starts bottoming out more than likely the culprit is aerated oil inside the shock. The constant pounding causes the oil to foam and it loses hydraulic resistance. Give it 30 minutes rest and the shock returns to normal.

    This happened to me my first trip down the Primrose Trail...the last two miles were NOT fun
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    i moved my sled and drove it a hundred yards and the shock is workin' fine. been sitting for 3 days and still holding great...not sure what the deal was. i've got one more hunt to do on the sled and then i'll have them reworked over the summer and be ready for next season. if i play my cards right...or the bears play them right i should say i might break 3000 miles on my NEW sled....ahhhh good times.

    I bet there was something up under the skid holding it up. Like stated before have seen folks with a dolly under the skid and folks claim their shocks are bad. Lucky for them I am honest.

    Did see a Doo that a guy thought he needed fatboy springs after a couple of rebuilds to find out that the sled had been assembled incorrectly with the skid spring retainers turned upside down.

    Mr Pid the rear skid on many of these new Cat Sno Pros do not have rear springs anymore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dupont Spinner View Post
    IMr Pid the rear skid on many of these new Cat Sno Pros do not have rear springs anymore.
    I got the same sled as BRWNBR and the front ones don't have any springs either. I'm a bit leery about it but hey, that's how you get a 160+ horsepower sled to weigh less than 500lbs.

    So far so good on mine, but then I haven't gotten out to ride nearly as much - just 700 mi on my new sled.

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    i love the floats when i'm riding..no bouncin' around with them smooth squishy ride when i drop and the front end does just fine..mine up pumped up a bit hard on teh front, i think i'm at 70lb on the front, might loosen them up this week to 50lb or so...
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