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Thread: crossing Sag

  1. #1
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    Default crossing Sag

    Okay I searched the forum and could not find anything, I bought a depline 10 ft raft for a real good deal and want to use it strictly for rowing or powering across the Sag to hunt Bou on the other side of the river.
    I always seen bou on the far side of the river and can only watch them, so I figured this would be a safer more productive way to hunt.
    I know it isnt a new theroy just looking for some info, like good places to cross or any experiences someone would like to share.

  2. #2
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Using a raft is FAR FAR FAR better than trying to wad across this river! Good choice. Starting at the DOT site next to Pump #3 there are places to start looking to cross over the river. Depending on rain/run off will depend on how high/low the water is. The water level can change in a hour if the conditions are right. North of Pump #3, just look and you will find a lot of crossing potentials. You can also use the raft if you shoot something that "crosses" before it expires. I particularly like the area next to Ice Cut...check it out. The later in the fall you go, the more chances you have of lower water...Hope that helps some.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Crossing on foot makes for a more exciting hunt, especially when you have to come back across with a bou on your back. I know that some spots are better than others, lessons learned

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    [QUOTE=fold308;921075]Crossing on foot makes for a more exciting hunt, especially when you have to come back across with a bou on your back. I know that some spots are better than others, lessons learned

    yeah it may be more exciting but no thanks I would rather float and stay high and dry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fold308 View Post
    Crossing on foot makes for a more exciting hunt, especially when you have to come back across with a bou on your back. I know that some spots are better than others, lessons learned
    And a good chance to end up dead too! From what I saw of that river, I wouldn't think of crossing it. Let alone crossing it with a heavy pack on my back. Many people have died trying to cross that river on foot.

  6. #6

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    I made the enormously stupid mistake of crossing the Sag in an Alpaca raft last year. I believe I was at the pullout by PS 3 that allows you to drive right down to the river. The river branches over a few gravel bars allowing easy traversing the first couple floats. However, the last branch was quite wide and the river was super fast. As I moved into the current, it nearly tipped me over. By the time I struggled over to the other side, it was nothing but cut-bank. No where to beach and it was extremely difficult to balance my gear and stay near the bank as I was swept down river. Just before entering the rock garden and rapids, I was able to beach my inner-tube on a narrow gravel bar. I was so shaken by the adventure that I didn't even bother to hunt. I simply rested and hiked back along the river about a mile until I was well above a good crossing site. Not my brightest moment in the outdoors....

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    If I am not mistaken, the Sag has taken more lives from people walking across it than almost any other river in Alaska. About two years ago a Special Forces guy crossed, shot a 'bou and drowned when he tried coming back across the river with meat on his back.

    Last year Ak Nimrod found a set of antlers in the river with a medal tag on them (non-resident). Pat was able to track down the hunter to get him his rack and found out that the reason the rack was "lost" is because his hunting partner died crossing the river and had lost the rack too.

    Pat always had an open invitation to boat people across the river and would make plans to help them.

    Point is, this is not a river to try and walk across IMHO.
    Last edited by Roger45; 04-05-2011 at 14:39. Reason: More Info
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    yes...use a good raft...AND wear a PFD!!! (life/floatation jacket) No caribou is worth your life...unless you just want to die...crossing the sag on foot is foolish.

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    Yeah I was planning on a PFD and all saftey equipment, I just dont want to drag my boat down the haul road so I figured a smaller raft type boat would be great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wiso_67 View Post
    Yeah I was planning on a PFD and all saftey equipment, I just dont want to drag my boat down the haul road so I figured a smaller raft type boat would be great.
    Yep, I believe a good 10 foot raft would be a great way to go. Good luck up there

  11. #11

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    Around the pump 2 launch, we were out in the main channel downstream about 3 miles. We got into some very high winds and the swells were kicking up to a couple of feet. The wind blew the tent out of the boat and we turned to go get it. I thought we were out of the swells and hit one sideways in my 20 foot predator that made us take water over the side of the boat. I pulled to shore, and we walked to go get the tent since it had blown to the bank. That really opened my eyes as to how strong that river can be.

    That river isn't one to mess with. For people wanting to just get across the river, an small raft will do, but take your time, make sure you see the hazards out there and be prepared to stay calm if something does happen.

    My favorite set up for bowhunting the Sag up here is a 14-16 foot inflatable with a 35 horse jet. Not only can you get across the river safely, but you can be a lot more mobile and get quite a ways from the road. No trailer needed.


  12. #12
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    One more thing...if you ever find you have to cross any river in Alaska on foot, and you have a pack on your back, before you step into the water, unbuckle the waist belt and chest straps. If you fall down, you want to be able to get out of the pack as fast as possible. Otherwise, you have an anchor on your back and the chances of drowning are BIG.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Great info will take these comments into consideration before crossing any river

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