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Thread: Muzzle Brake

  1. #1

    Default Muzzle Brake

    I have a Browning Ti in 300 WSM, it pushes a little hard when fired. Wanting to consider a brake for it. I have had Andy Hawks do work in the past for me. Read where a brake does not affect speed or energy. Any thoughts or expirences on this? Thanks Mike

  2. #2

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    Here is an alternative to a brake, you will get some recoil reduction with out the extra noise around you. Though a brake does not increase the sound of the rifle, it will however direct the report back toward the shooter and stand near byers.
    http://www.magnaport.com/rifle.html
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  3. #3
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    I don't consider a noisy brake to be an option and I highly recommend Magna-port. That and a good recoil pad should be enough.
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    Check with WWG and see if they can install the BOSS or if not you could send it to Browning and they could install one. If your not familiar the BOSS is a tunable muzzlebrake and it comes with a ported (brake) and the CR (conventional recoil) thread on something or another I forget what they call the darn thing. Anyhow I had the ported on a 7mm Mag and it recoiled like a .410 or so.

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    We use a brake that is demonstrably quieter than any other. Magnaport reduces muzzle jump to me, but not really felt recoil. That being said. I dont use brakes

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    i have owned and shot "braked" rifles for years, but do not recommend them for hunting as they are incredibly loud and can actually damage your hearing.

    with the new recoil pads easily installed, even hard kicking rifles such as the .375 winchester can be fired comfortably. if in doubt try the muzzle brake first and see what you think.
    happy trails.
    jh

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    I think it is Matchgrade Machine that makes theseClosable-brake-assembled.jpgClosable-brake-disassembled.jpg
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    I love my KDF muzzle break on my .300 magnum. Had it installled a good 15 years ago, so sweet to shoot. The noise, yes , its true it is loud, but so is my music. Im not sure they even make KDF brakes any more, but im sticking with it.

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    Few will argue that a brake makes a difference in felt recoil or that the shooter hears more of the discharge there are other aspects to consider. Another thing to consider are the different styles of brakes, i.e. radial brakes vs. baffle style brakes and simple porting like magna-porting.

    While it is true that the shooter and possibly others behind the shooter are exposed to more noise than a firearm without a brake, that can possibly be an advantage. Since the brake doesn't increase the sound coming out of the firearm only where the sound is directed consider that if you are firing at a target there is less sound directed at the target making that target less likely to figure out where the sound is coming from. This is true more so with a baffled brake than a radial brake, this can be an advantage for predator hunting.

    Gus

  10. #10

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    I've never been a fan of brakes and shoot a 300 RUM without one. That being said, the question is... what are your shooting needs?

    This past weekend I was at a 1K long range shoot with my 300 RUM. When I sent my bullets down range, I could not see the impact because of the muzzle jump, while the guy next to me, shooting a 338 Lapua, could see all his bullet impacts. He let me shoot his Lapua and 300 WM and his Lapua recoiled less than my 12 lb 25-06 (scope and bi-pod included).

    Since then, I've changed my thinking... probably 99% of my shooting is load development, checking drops, and practice, all of which my ears are protected. In most Montana hunting situations, I have time to put ear plugs in. And I should mention, that there were a couple of times my ear plugs were out when some of these guys with their braked big magnums touched one off. It was loud, but I got over it.

    I've got a couple of large case builds coming up, and they will have Muscle Brakes on them. The Muscle Brakes have a 90 degree port that deflects the blast of the other ports.

    Seeing the impact of your bullet is a good thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    I've never been a fan of brakes and shoot a 300 RUM without one. That being said, the question is... what are your shooting needs?

    This past weekend I was at a 1K long range shoot with my 300 RUM. When I sent my bullets down range, I could not see the impact because of the muzzle jump, while the guy next to me, shooting a 338 Lapua, could see all his bullet impacts. He let me shoot his Lapua and 300 WM and his Lapua recoiled less than my 12 lb 25-06 (scope and bi-pod included).

    Since then, I've changed my thinking... probably 99% of my shooting is load development, checking drops, and practice, all of which my ears are protected. In most Montana hunting situations, I have time to put ear plugs in. And I should mention, that there were a couple of times my ear plugs were out when some of these guys with their braked big magnums touched one off. It was loud, but I got over it.

    I've got a couple of large case builds coming up, and they will have Muscle Brakes on them. The Muscle Brakes have a 90 degree port that deflects the blast of the other ports.

    Seeing the impact of your bullet is a good thing.
    I'm having a 4 port Muscle Brake installed on a 338-378 right now, I've heard good things about them but this will be the first Muscle Brake on any of my rifles.

    Gus

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    I had a 7 lb 338 Win Mag magnaported, it controlled muzzle lift alot but I don't think it reduced recoil at all - The "boss" muzzle brake is, to my ears, the worst of them all - I had Richard Buss / MuzzleMaster in Eugene OR make one of his for a "boss" that simply replaced it and it worked perfect, I still cannot believe how "quiet" his brakes are when compared to the others and they control recoil like a son-of-a-gun - In today's world with all the "high tech" bullets and great components I don't often see the "need" to have to resort to a brake

  13. #13

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    I have a "KDF" brake on a my 300WM and 338RUM. I do a lot of shooting away from other shooters (during the week at the range and on our property). The great thing is I can shoot alot for practice, but then screw the brakes off for hunting and install the caps made by KDF, when they put the brakes on. Funny thing is I never feel the recoil when shooting an elk or deer.

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    I have a Weatherby 338-378. I had a MPI Thumbhole stock made, a Sims recoil pad, a mercury reducer and a muzzle brake made for it. Shooting it with the brake on is about like a 30-06 and without the brake about like a regular .338WM. I have not shot it yet without hearing protection. I will carry plugs with me in the field and use them if time permits...
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    Normally taking the brake off will change the POI and it's a normal caveat with most all brake manufacturers - I too never seem to remember any recoil when shooting at game - Honestly, Richard's brake design has completely altered my feelings on brakes

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    Quote Originally Posted by txguide View Post
    I have a "KDF" brake on a my 300WM and 338RUM. I do a lot of shooting away from other shooters (during the week at the range and on our property). The great thing is I can shoot alot for practice, but then screw the brakes off for hunting and install the caps made by KDF, when they put the brakes on. Funny thing is I never feel the recoil when shooting an elk or deer.
    I second the KDF brakes that is what I had put on my 30-06 for my wife to shoot and it worked like a charm, Has bout 60% recoil reduction and the noise is directed out to the sides not back at you and it is threaded on so I can take it off when needed like you said. However I have noticed a change of Impact when the brake is off and on @200 yards it shoots about 3 inches higher with the brake off rather than on.

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    not long after GIATT CORP. came out with the "boss" system for Browning & Winchester there was alot of backlash due to apparent hearing damage from the shooters and immediately quite a few designers came up with the redirection principle for their brakes - It does in fact redirect alot of the "crack" foward and to the sides but there's a trade off in that the more you do that the less actual felt recoil reduction will be realized and there is still the noise factor for anyone on either side of the shooter - lessening recoil isn't too difficult to accomplish, it's the crack that comes with it ... MuzzleMaster brakes are designed as a 2 piece, inner & outer brake with the baffles offset and there is a more mathematically complicated "degree" factor pertaining to the angle the holes are "drilled" but the "crack" is greatly, truly greatly, reduced not only to the operator but at either side as well - When I ran upon Richard Buss at a gunshow in Portland I was impressed with his demeanor and "speak" so made him this offer, I would give him 25% to order 2, one on a 300 win mag and 1 on a 338 win mag - when they were ready I would come to his shop and we would both take the rifles to the range, we did that and I stood to the side 90* to the muzzle w/o protection as he fired both - end of story ? I paid the man and ordered another, gave him over a dozen more orders within the next 6 months - he is honest and does what he promises (which is huge in today's gunsmith world)

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    I've installed literally hundreds of KDF brakes over the past 15 years or so, and have only removed 2 because they were too "noisy" for the shooter.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Yep Doug you did the work on mine and did a great job! Thanks again,

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    Sit beside someone shooting a braked magnum and reconsider.

    An ultralight 300WSM isn't intended to be wrung out on the benchrest - it's intended to be hunted. As such, it's going to be an uncomfortable little sucker on the bench.

    Also, I can't help but think that any porting on a rifle is going to yield a million little crap collectors in the field. I guess you can tape over the whole shebang and blow confetti all over at the shot.

    Not a brake fan, here.

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