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Thread: Invert Tires warm garden planters/round raise beds

  1. #1
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Default Invert Tires warm garden planters/round raise beds

    Sun heats the black rubber. help with soil warmth.
    cut out one side wall right at tread,
    tricky to roll inverted but after a few it's easy.
    Need bigger opening, cut out other side wall 1/2 way to the tread. (too far it gets floppy)
    Free at many of the tire shops/stores. Good recycle use.
    Don't look like tires now, look like a fancy raised bed garden planter.
    Throw it where you want it on the ground.
    Fill with compost/soil mix, (tip: pack the outside of the bottom layer so when you water the water
    don't run down & out the tire/soil interface.)
    stick in a broccoli, (or sun flower, onions, lettuce etc) easy to water. last a long time.
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    Great idea on how to use the tires. I was thinking of using some this year also and was worried how they would look. They look much better how you have done them. Thanks for the idea!

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    Member slimm's Avatar
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    That looks like a way sweet garden, in fact genius.
    Low maintance, High yeild and extended growing time, and all this whole time i been trying to make my garden look like ol grannys but mostly ended up with a few bushels of green tomatoes and a bunch of weeds.
    How do you water? got anymore pictures?

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    if anyone needs some tire i got some you can have for free, if you have a nice rack i might require a hug tho.
    Semper Fi!

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    LOL...no rack, but need tires..too bad I'm in North Pole.

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKHuntressNP View Post
    LOL...no rack, but need tires..too bad I'm in North Pole.
    u can drive down and get um, i got a extra bed at myplace
    Semper Fi!

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    Quote Originally Posted by greythorn3 View Post
    u can drive down and get um, i got a extra bed at myplace

    Hmmm, is it solar heated like mudbuddy makes? hehe

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    i dont know, i use fuel oil and wood.
    Semper Fi!

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimm View Post
    That looks like a way sweet garden, in fact genius.
    Low maintance, High yeild and extended growing time, and all this whole time i been trying to make my garden look like ol grannys but mostly ended up with a few bushels of green tomatoes and a bunch of weeds.
    How do you water? got anymore pictures?
    Water: I have 2 -- 55 gallon drums elevated, well is cold water, sun heats the water in the drums. I ran garden hose around with "T"s & short waters hoses where needed. Gravity from drums.
    Going to almost all raised beds filled with compost.
    Pic: 1 is May last year, from standing on compost bin, can se drums. 2nd: later in the year from water drums
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    DOn't take this the wrong way - I think the tire deal is great - but I am wondering about the fact that rubber, being a petroleum product, would leech into the soil and kind of ruin the whole "organic" gardening experience. I don't know anything about it, but just my first thought. Love the idea, and the watering method is exactly what I tried to convince my wife of - and she shot it down until she saw yours! LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by mudbuddy View Post
    Water: I have 2 -- 55 gallon drums elevated, well is cold water, sun heats the water in the drums. I ran garden hose around with "T"s & short waters hoses where needed. Gravity from drums.
    Going to almost all raised beds filled with compost.
    Pic: 1 is May last year, from standing on compost bin, can se drums. 2nd: later in the year from water drums
    Really like this idea...I usually just have a bucket inside my greenhouse that I water with..you know, fill it up, let water warm up, use gallon milk jug to get water and water plants...the way you have it set up is great. I had thought of something like that, but didn't think of the gravity feed thing. I was wondering how to "pump" the water out. Although, doubt the gravity feed thing will work with the soaker hoses I bought last year.

    Keep the ideas coming...My husband is soo going to hate you though. He already swears I make a couple extra passes with my tiller each year and that my garden has doubled in size since I started it 4 years ago

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    I have a I think its a 40 gl rubbermake trash can in my green house the sun heats up the water in the day
    and puts out some heat after the sun gos down

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    AK explorer:
    "rubber, being a petroleum product, would leech into the soil and kind of ruin the whole "organic" gardening"

    I believe tires break down less than other rubbers & plastics (tires in land fills still since the 50s)
    I use: rubber, vinyl & plastic hoses; PVC water pipes, valves & fittings; various plastic plant pots & starter 6 packs; various Clear, black & white sheet plastics; several various plastic kitchen utensils; a microwave; plastic 55 gallon drums; Green house sheeting; Aspirin; various size plastic trash cans; 5 gallon plastic buckets; nylon strings & ropes; & on & on. All petroleum products
    Even my Horse Manure compost is not considered "organic".
    I buy some plants from commercial nursery's, Green houses & other stores, knowing they use
    pesticides, plant foods & procedures not meeting "true organic" criteria.

    I just haven't figured out how to be a "true blue, hard core organic gardner" If you have, you are "Awesome".

    GH water:
    Water from drums also feeds the GH for auto watering & various uses.
    Just have to remember to keep the drums full. Underground hose to a GH manifold valve to fill them.
    I turn the valve on & try to remember to shut it off. Now I have a piece of orange yarn on the valve, goes on
    my finger until I shut the valve. Have overfilled a few times for hours, irrigates the garden well,
    but muddy mess sometimes.
    Need an overfill shut off or a timed valve, some day. (On the list)

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    I didn't know they break down slower. I'm not fully organic if using a hose disqualifies. LOL Just an observation tho - really cool idea!

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    i only water my garden with my urine, hows that for organtic?
    Semper Fi!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mudbuddy View Post
    Water: I have 2 -- 55 gallon drums elevated, well is cold water, sun heats the water in the drums. I ran garden hose around with "T"s & short waters hoses where needed. Gravity from drums.
    Going to almost all raised beds filled with compost.
    Pic: 1 is May last year, from standing on compost bin, can se drums. 2nd: later in the year from water drums
    Great idea's mudbuddy and beautiful garden.
    I been cutting up tires like they're going out of style. I just went to a nearby Dariy and picked up a few yards of manure, i also have several huge rolls of EPDM rubber roofing sitting around.
    I havent been this excited about a garden in quite awhile, I appreciate you shareing your ideas, for sure...

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    ires leech an awful lot of dioxins into the soil when exposed to UV and then rain, and the dioxins are then taken up by plants. I would definitely recommend staying away from plants like zucchini, which take up much higher than average amounts of what is in the soil, including contaminants if they are present.

    Personally, I would advise strongly against using tires for growing any edibles, dioxins are nasty compounds that mimic estrogen in your body. There are much better products available for warming the soil, that are much easier to work with than tires.


    I think if you read up on dioxins and the human endocrine system, and then tested your soil for dioxins, you would stop growing food near them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by andweav View Post
    ires leech an awful lot of dioxins into the soil when exposed to UV and then rain, and the dioxins are then taken up by plants. I would definitely recommend staying away from plants like zucchini, which take up much higher than average amounts of what is in the soil, including contaminants if they are present.

    Personally, I would advise strongly against using tires for growing any edibles, dioxins are nasty compounds that mimic estrogen in your body. There are much better products available for warming the soil, that are much easier to work with than tires.


    I think if you read up on dioxins and the human endocrine system, and then tested your soil for dioxins, you would stop growing food near them.
    Heres some of what i found on the subject,,,,,,,,

    Do Recycled Tires Pose A Health Risk?

    According to Charles Sanders, a gardening expert and writer for Backwoods Home Magazine (where you can find an excellent article on using recycled tired in your garden here)
    http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/sanders98.html , that answer is no. According to Charles:

    There is no appreciable risk in using recycled tires in the vegetable garden. While it is a fact that rubber tires do contain minute amounts of certain heavy metals, the compounds are tightly bonded within the actual rubber compound and do not leach into the soil. One of the ingredients in the rubber recipe is zinc. Zinc, in fact, is an essential plant element. I also expect that rubber is safer to use than treated lumber that contains copper and arsenic.

    Now, let’s look at a differing opinion. According to the Editor-In-Chief at Mother Earth News, the answer is yes, tires do pose a long-term health risk.

    Short-term, yes, tire planters are OK, although the soil in black tire planters will probably get hotter than most plants would prefer. Long-term, no, because the tire rubber will slowly biodegrade and release zinc, carcinogenic PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and other toxic compounds into your soil.

    The final answer? Well, I looked all over the ‘Net and found differing opinions on this. I went to several gardening forums, read articles, the whole nine yards. And, I don’t have an answer.

    Half of the things I read say yes, old tires are safe because they’re “old”, so most if not all of the chemicals and “off-gassing” is gone. The other half said “No, don’t use tires for vegetables”, because they’re always going to leach.

    I’ll leave you with one more opinion. This one comes from Paul Farber, author of the book “Tire Crafting”. He runs TireCrafting.com, a great site with plenty of projects on how to reuse tires and give them new life as usable things. Here’s what he has to say about tire gardening:

    Because of toxic concerns of the public, more than thirty years of internationally marketing and teaching tire crafting and gardening in tires, I expected to receive a lot of factual tire toxic information. We haven’t.

    Most information has been about toxins and health issues in the manufacture of tires, and toxins emitted from tires when they are burned. Some is about tires leaching toxins when they are ground up or chipped for use as fertilizer, or in hydroponics, or as playground buffers or walking trails.

    Occasionally, we receive an emotional complaint from an organic purist who will quote from some organic gardening magazine article. From researching the article’s own sources, my conclusion is that toxic evidence was distorted to deceive readers for the purpose of boosting sales. To my knowledge, no legitimate proof has ever emerged that a tire has enough of anything toxic in it to harm humans, and that a solid tire, whith no steel exposed, will leach nothing but carbon and/or sulfur.

    http://www.thegreenestdollar.com/200...n-your-garden/

  19. #19
    Member slimm's Avatar
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    Here's some more,,

    ("tonight I have some information about the effects of using the tires in any kind of garden. When it was brought to my attention there could be anything to be concerned about from the content of the tires, I did a search this afternoon to find all I could, before moving along with my plan to use the tires. I got in touch with the research dept. of the source of the original post on the web. The reply is that any information they have been able to obtain suggests there is no appreciable risk using tires in the food garden. Yes, rubber does contain extremely small amounts of certain heavy metals but one needs to know that these compounds are fixed tightly in the rubber matrix and do not leach. If the tires were that pourous, they would never be able to hold air. Also, zinc is an essential plant nutrient, so there is nothing to worry about in that regard, from that element. There is no risk from petroleum or gas to their knowledge. They also can guarantee that the rubber is much safer to use than arsenic laced treated lumber. Since I wasn't really even thinking about the vegetable part of the garden in the first place, I'm at ease with the information at hand. I've done my homework and got the feed back that will make planting anything I had intended to, with out any hesitation. I'd be more fearful of what the neighbor dog dumps around the garden, than I would an old, worn to the ground, no tread left, tire. Come to think of it, if I use the tires, the dog will still have his way with them. There's where any appreciable risk is, in using those tires.")
    http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...471414790.html

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    Thanks for sharing this information. This is really innovative and it could give a new look to the garden. There are also designer pots from well known manufacturers which could be used. It is better to buy these kind of pots from a online store as they provide some discounts.

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