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Thread: Storm Damage at Sun & Fun

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    Default Storm Damage at Sun & Fun

    A sever thunderstorm went through the Sun & Fun airshow yesterday. No injuries but about 40 or 50 planes were damaged. The photos are hard to look at. It looks worse that the wind storm at LHD a few years ago.

    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?fb...622&aid=358039

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    Last edited by LuJon; 04-01-2011 at 07:40. Reason: embedded vid

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    WOW...


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    I remember one January when 100-knot winds ripped around Campbell Point and scoured Anchorage, even wiping out parts of the docks. The problem with all the aircraft that were damaged was that the tiedown cables were yanked from the earth.

    It's too bad, I think. that today's students aren't taught how to properly secure an aircraft against such winds. After all, airplanes love wind. Without it, they'd be anchored forever to the earth, wouldn't they? Talk to an old timer who can show you how to secure a 2x4 or spruce limb atop the leading edges, and get the tail off the ground, facing your airplane into the wind. 100-know winds? PIece of cake . . . . .

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    Mort,

    This would make a great lesson and would be really fun to get with one of the old time AK pilots who has been around the block to do a video on. I would bet that you could get EAA to actually work with you and produce such a video since it would certainly save them $$ in the long run! If not I hope to have some time this summer and may just knock on some hangars and see if someone is interested in tossing something together on youtube for no other reason than to hopefully save someone this type of heartache! I plan to start training for my ppl this summer and I am just looking at these pics and honestly have NO IDEA how they could have saved their planes.

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    I saw that. I was there abt 3-yrs ago. Good Fly-In..

    Almost makes ya wanta go out and get some insurance. Ha!.

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    Herring spotting for the Togiak herring seine season resulted in a few destroyed airplanes over the years. As a spotter, I flew that fishery both on floats and on wheels and decided that I preferred wheels for that one.

    After several airplanes were destroyed while tied down on Nunavarchak Beach in a 100+mph wind in the early eighties we figured out a fairly fool proof way to tie down wheel planes. We would completely bury four tires on edge in a rectangular array on the beach with them spaced so that the airplane could be secured in any one of four directions. Each tire had a sturdy loop of rope tied through it just visible above the gravel beach. The tires along with 50 gallon drums of avgas were furnished for us and transported by the boats we spotted for.

    The primary protection against the worst winds was a line looped through the rope on the tire out in front of the airplane and tied to the gear legs just inside of both main wheels. This line was pulled tight. The wing tiedown lines were tied with less tension so that any jerking resulting from strong gusts was absorbed by the two lines going to the landing gear legs. The tail tiedown was left slack enough so that the tail could fly in a strong wind with the wings virtually level. This arrangement worked very well. Some of the spotters even had contests during storms with the wing tiedowns untied. With engine off, they would try to see who could keep all three wheels off the ground the longest in strong gusts or a strong sustained wind.

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    I lived in Lakeland for five years while in undergrad school. We'd get some pretty nasty storms...just like that one. Makes me want to cry. I feel for the owners. Griz, how would you get the tail off the ground?

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Mort,

    This would make a great lesson and would be really fun to get with one of the old time AK pilots who has been around the block to do a video on. I would bet that you could get EAA to actually work with you and produce such a video since it would certainly save them $$ in the long run! If not I hope to have some time this summer and may just knock on some hangars and see if someone is interested in tossing something together on youtube for no other reason than to hopefully save someone this type of heartache! I plan to start training for my ppl this summer and I am just looking at these pics and honestly have NO IDEA how they could have saved their planes.
    Takes a bit of preparation, but: If a tail dragger, lift the tail and put the tail wheel atop a standing 55-gallon steel drum. Secute it there. Place a length of wood 2x4 along the top of the leading edge of each wing. Secure the wings in the usual manner, after facing the planen into the predicted wind direction. Go home and enjoy loafing around until the blow stops. Head back to the airport and shake your head over all the OTHER damaged airplanes!!! The harder it blows, the more your aiplane wants to hug the earth. The 2x4's tied to each leading edge erases any tendency for the airplane to "bounce," so there is no worry about tying it down too tightly at the wing struts, as Monguse mentions.

    If your plane is tricycle geared, forget the 55-gallon drum . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDREAMER View Post
    I lived in Lakeland for five years while in undergrad school. We'd get some pretty nasty storms...just like that one. Makes me want to cry. I feel for the owners. Griz, how would you get the tail off the ground?
    As I noted in a response to LuJon, lift the tailwheel to set it atop an upright 55-gallon drum. A full drum is best, but an empty one will serve. Monguse has an excellent solution of on a sand beach. Still, and as he mentioned, the tail must be up to place the wings in a level flight configuration, if possible. If nothing else, and you're out in the bush, build a bipod or tripod from heavy spruce limbs or cut spruce trees. The real life saver, though, is that 2x4 (or spruce boughs again) secured atop the leading edge of the wings.

    Over more than thirty years, I've done this many, many times - - - - - - NEVER had any wind damage, though I've seen plenty of high winds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Mort,

    This would make a great lesson and would be really fun to get with one of the old time AK pilots who has been around the block to do a video on. I would bet that you could get EAA to actually work with you and produce such a video since it would certainly save them $$ in the long run! If not I hope to have some time this summer and may just knock on some hangars and see if someone is interested in tossing something together on youtube for no other reason than to hopefully save someone this type of heartache! I plan to start training for my ppl this summer and I am just looking at these pics and honestly have NO IDEA how they could have saved their planes.
    Hey LuJon - - - - - your PM mailbox is full, and I'm tryring to get a PM to you. Wanna clean out your PM box . . . . . ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 1 View Post
    Hey LuJon - - - - - your PM mailbox is full, and I'm tryring to get a PM to you. Wanna clean out your PM box . . . . . ?
    Well heck, you wouldn't think with a 500 PM limit that it would get away from me like that! It is all cleared out now.

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    Default Defeating Lift with Wing Covers.

    Attachment 47404Attachment 47404
    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 1 View Post
    Takes a bit of preparation, but: If a tail dragger, lift the tail and put the tail wheel atop a standing 55-gallon steel drum. Secute it there. Place a length of wood 2x4 along the top of the leading edge of each wing. Secure the wings in the usual manner, after facing the planen into the predicted wind direction. Go home and enjoy loafing around until the blow stops. Head back to the airport and shake your head over all the OTHER damaged airplanes!!! The harder it blows, the more your aiplane wants to hug the earth. The 2x4's tied to each leading edge erases any tendency for the airplane to "bounce," so there is no worry about tying it down too tightly at the wing struts, as Monguse mentions.

    If your plane is tricycle geared, forget the 55-gallon drum . . .
    Griz - I put wing covers with baffles sewed in on top of the wing last fall. That destroys lift AND keeps the ice off.

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    Cubs need to face the wind. A Cub that's getting much wind from the back will see the struts fold. That's why you'll see Cubs with 2x4s taped to the struts. The newer HD struts are also a good solution. Aside from that the next biggest failure point will be the earth anchors. Of course that's assuming the ropes are adequate. If you lease a spot at an airport and the anchors were already there? You have no idea what's down there. The planes at Lakeland were mostly untied according to reports. A couple had those "claw" tie downs. And everybody acts surprised? The only surprise was the weather. Those planes were unprepared for it. Tying planes down well is not hard to do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RocketRick View Post
    Attachment 47404Attachment 47404

    Griz - I put wing covers with baffles sewed in on top of the wing last fall. That destroys lift AND keeps the ice off.
    I'd still think about getting the ass-end off the ground . . . . .

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    And... make sure the planes around you are tied down well!

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    Wow, that makes you want to cry. Hope all owners had good insurance.
    Quote Originally Posted by tralika View Post
    A sever thunderstorm went through the Sun & Fun airshow yesterday. No injuries but about 40 or 50 planes were damaged. The photos are hard to look at. It looks worse that the wind storm at LHD a few years ago.

    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?fb...622&aid=358039
    May God Bless The USA!
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