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Thread: Easiest growing crops for beginners in Southcentral

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    Default Easiest growing crops for beginners in Southcentral

    This is going to be our first time growing a garden.
    What is everyone's recommendation as the easiest veggies for us rookies to try growing and work on our green thumb(s)?

  2. #2

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    Potatoes, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, chard, peas, radishes, turnips. Perennials rhubarb, horseradish, sorrel. Go to the extension office and buy the master gardener book I think they dropped the course but they still have the book. It used to be $40.00 but it is worth the money.
    Chuck

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Last year was my first year, and like you I was looking for reasonably easy stuff for a rookie. I had great success with green leaf lettuce, spinach, kale, bok choi, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, and potatoes. The only things I tried to grow that didn't really work out were zucchini, as it was a cool summer and I don't have a greenhouse. I started everything from seed except for the bok choi, which I bought on a whim the day before I started transplanting.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by towerhand View Post
    This is going to be our first time growing a garden.
    What is everyone's recommendation as the easiest veggies for us rookies to try growing and work on our green thumb(s)?
    Depending on how much sun/shade you have on your garden spot You can probably roto-till your garden by the 1st of May... but... the ground won't be warm enough for anything to start growing until at least the middle of may, and depending on the weather maybe the Memorial day weekend...
    From Seed we grow radish, peas, leaf lettuce, turnip, snap beans carrots and beets..
    I buy onion starts when I can find them, and I usually go to P&M gardens above Eagle River, or buy their starts at Walmart for
    cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and brussel sprouts. I prefer the locally grown starts to things some of the big "box" stores import from Arkansas or Alabama or ????
    You might want to try your hand at growing things like raspberries, rhubarb, strawberries, etc... depending on how much space you have or what you want to play with...
    I second the advice to get the gardening book at the Extension office... someone said you can download or order most of their stuff on-line...
    A couple pointers... you do not put any kind of manure or compost/manure mix on root vegetables such as spuds, carrots or beets..
    rotate your vegetables, that is don't grow the same thing in the same spot year after year.. Each type of vegetable has several different types such as radishes and carrots... Some are great, and some not so.... So I suggest you keep some kind of log or record each year, try several of the different varieties see what you prefer and what works best for you... /John

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Good advice on here...I also recommend the greens- leaf and romaine lettuce, chard and Kale. Spinach and Boc or Pac Choi are both good if you are down in SC (too hot most of the time in the interior and they tend to bolt). Radishes, carrots and turnips are easy to grow, but thin them and keep them well watered as the season progresses. Cauliflower and cabbage and broccoli are good veggies and thrive just about anywhere. I also do some herbs in pots here and there. Tomatoes, cucumbers and squash will need a greenhouse to do really well, and even just a simple frame with a plastic covering and you are good to go there.

    If you have enough room, get a patch of rhubarb started(usually started with a hunk or two of root/bulb) and also a chive and/or bunching green onions patch. I love the stuff that grows back every year! You won't be able to really harvest that the first year, but after that it is so nice.

    Good luck, just have fun, and enjoy your bounty of fresh salads and vegetables. Every years is different and a lot depends on weather, so best to plant a variety...No doubt you will be hooked and you'll want more and more garden space once you get the hang of it.

    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Grandma;
    If you have enough room, get a patch of rhubarb started(usually started with a hunk or two of root/bulb) and also a chive and/or bunching green onions patch. I love the stuff that grows back every year! You won't be able to really harvest that the first year, but after that it is so nice.

    Good luck, just have fun, and enjoy your bounty of fresh salads and vegetables. Every years is different and a lot depends on weather, so best to plant a variety...No doubt you will be hooked and you'll want more and more garden space once you get the hang of it.

    Grandma Lori[/SIZE
    [/FONT]
    Sometimes... you can find some rhubarb starts mixed in with the flower bulb displays a Walmart or Freds... But probably the best way is to get a piece of root (or 3) from someone you know, and you can see what kind of rhubarb it is... I never realized there was that much difference in rhubarb types until we got some green stuff growing that never turns red.. it doesn't make a good pie, cobbler nor Wine.../John

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Get or start some lettuce. I grow ruby red( Denali seed) & romaine (any brand)
    I start a new row (6 plants) of lettuce every 10 days, so to have fresh good size all summer.
    Grow some onions from sets (small onion bulbs) Seeds work but take a while to get big enough to use.
    Now you got your fresh salads.
    Try some broccoli in a hill or raised bed.
    Throw in a row of carrots in a raised hill & thin them as the pop up to 1" apart.
    Potatoes are fun & easy, but cheap to buy in the fall & take up allot of garden space. (garden size is a factor & if you want various types) (i grow a few peanut, big row of yukons, few reds & a few shepody)
    If any room left, experiment.
    One time you should grow at least 1 OS Cross cabbage, just to say you grew a monster cabbage.
    Grow what you like to eat. We grow & freeze beets, broccoli, green beans, peas, carrots.
    Kids love to watch the mammoth sun flowers grow & they get huge. I alway have 2 o 3 on the North end.
    Make it fun & useful & you'll enjoy it.

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