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Thread: fixing deep scratches on a scott HB ??

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    Default fixing deep scratches on a scott HB ??

    I have a few deep scrathes on the bottom of my HB, and some gouges on the center keel.
    Scott cnoe sent me some red gelcoat and hardener,with instructions.Cn these repairs be done when its +7 outside? Do most of you worry about these deep scrathes and gouges on your keel? Do most do yearly touchups on the bottom of your freighters ? The glass freighters are more maintanence than aluminum but they do seem vey durable.

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    grit ... (Check your PM in-box. Would like to pick your brain about a 330. Thanks.)

    I have Kevlar cloth in both 5 oz/yard and 1.2 oz/yard from prior dog sled making projects. I'm wondering if the bottom of my new HB, particularly along the keels and at the rear might benefit from some tough, sacrificial material - the first time I have to seasonally maintain the hull. The bow, I'm told, already has the kevlar felt. I haven't had to do squat to maintain my Grumman 19' I've used for a decade. The HudsonBay will be a new experience. In May, I go to Whitehorse to pick my HB up.

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    Member oldmil007's Avatar
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    quote: "Can these repairs be done when its +7 outside? "

    You jest I hope!


    The gelcoat manufacturers suggest 60 degrees-f as a minimum for the gelcoat to achieve it's full physical properties (including hardness, strength, elasticity). At that temp catalyze the gelcoat with the hardener at 3% maximum by volume. (example: 100cc gelcoat, 3cc MEKP)

    Catalyzed at a lower temp or with extra hardener is a crap shoot. It may harden but the physical properties will be diminished.

    Hope this may be of help. Been doing this stuff for a living for 20+ years. PM me if I can be of any assistance.

    - Jay

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    Kevlar reinforcements for abrasion are very common on commercially built whitewater canoes. I say go for it!

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    the HB comes with a front kevlar strip to protect the bow. how much would it slow the canoe down to add this kevlar guard the full length of the center keel? has anyone done this?

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    most epoxies have the temp range specs on the can/jug or avail. online. Most will cure just fine between 60-75 degrees(F). If you could bring it inside, all the better. The repairs are necessary because you don't want to expose the fiberglass to moisture. Ask Scott what the temp range of their repair stuff.

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    On my Scott HB I sold. I was going to use armor all bed liner on just the keel strips. Max uses it on his canoe rental fleet in Sterling
    and it holds up great. I think with the rough texture you may see a increase in speed also. Based on rough texture on boat hulls
    versus smooth.

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    I have sprayed the bed liner material on several surfaces, Fiberglass, Royalex, poly's of different manufacture, roto mold plastics.
    and Aluminum. All surfaces have held the product on very very well. I do prep the areas to be sprayed by sanding and using a chemical cleaner such as acetone and MEK before it is applied. I have the guy spray the minimum he can spray and he can spray it almost like glass finish, its shinny when he is done not marbled like when on a bed liner,, its just how you spray it and how close you are to the item you are spraying that makes the different textures.
    I have not noticed any difference in perfomance in paddlng with the keel ends having this product put on.
    and in 5 years of service I have never had any wear thru.
    When I had my Scott canoes built for me last year, I went ahead and had Pat at Scott put the kevlar keel shields on. they are doing pretty good too, but last year was their first season so we will see more better this year.. as they get more times out.
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskacanoe View Post
    When I had my Scott canoes built for me last year, I went ahead and had Pat at Scott put the kevlar keel shields on. they are doing pretty good too, but last year was their first season so we will see more better this year.. as they get more times out.
    Max
    I never heard that you took delivery of some. Which models did you order, and do you send them out with motors? What size? Do you send them out with any other non-std equipment like outriggers? Sorry for all the questions, but I'm just trying to catch up here. ;-)

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    Would the keel protective strips from scott be difficult to put on after the fact, Are they just applied with adhesive or are they applied with heat.

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Scott Canoes

    I never heard that you took delivery of some. Which models did you order, and do you send them out with motors? What size? Do you send them out with any other non-std equipment like outriggers? Sorry for all the questions, but I'm just trying to catch up here. ;-)
    I bought 9 of his double enders for my rental fleet and had ordered a HB also. I bought a new suburban and a enclosed trailer to haul them in. I had a friend of mine that wanted to drive to Alaska last summer so I just had him drive up with the new rig.
    I ordered the canoes from Pat and had him deliver them to Calgary. then my guy stopped and picked them up and came on to Alaska with the load.
    The week before the guy was to drive up , Pat called and said he could not get the HB done for me in time. I had already sold the canoe to a guy in Valdez, so it was a big disapointment for him that I was not able to bring his boat up as I had promised.
    but I did get my 9 double enders and they are great canoes.
    the best I have ever had in my fleet so far. they are royalex boats.
    I had him put the kevlar guards on before he shipped them and I do not know how he applies them, I am supposing he uses an adhesive that works with the Royalex material.
    I guess we need to ask Pat about that.
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    grit,
    The kevlar is put on like another layer of glass. All you need to do is rough up the bottom and lay the kevlar on with polyester resin. You may need to apply two coats of resin to fill the weave. Then re-apply the gelcoat over the new patch. It shouldn't effect drag on the boat but will add weight from the resin. Use a rubber squeegee to apply the resin and wipe any runs or excess off. The most difficult part of the project will be cutting the kevlar. You may pay as much for the special scissors to cut it as you would for the fabric. Plaschem in Anchorage sells the kevlar by the yard and I'm sure they would cut you a piece to match if you send them a paper pattern.

    I considered applying a coat of polyurea (bediner) on my new JB when it arrives but have decided not for this reason. Fiberglass is easy to repair. If I apply something else like the bedliner material then a repair would become a nightmare. A kevlar skid plate however is just as easy to repair as fiberglass. The kevlar is just tougher, lighter, and stiffer and more expensive.

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    Default Kudos to Pat at Scott Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskacanoe View Post
    I guess we need to ask Pat about that. Max
    Pat has helped me a few ways with my Albany. He got me a part I needed, and some free instructions on building spray rails, and such. I get to start those soon, as my 14' clear ash will be delivered from Superior Hardwoods in Fairbanks within the next two weeks; I couldn't find any that long anywhere in the Anchorage/Valley areas. I just finished refinishing my gunwales and am taking the extra step of spar varnish this year to celebrate all the new additions done to my Scott this winter (see the separate thread in canoe forum).

    Max, I'm betting that the Scotts in your fleet there are very durable and hard to bust; I know my Scott is.

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    I will be putting on the spray rails on my boat too what type of instructions are needed bob

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    Default spray rail instructions for Scott canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by bobw View Post
    I will be putting on the spray rails on my boat too what type of instructions are needed bob
    Here's what I've been told, and what I'm going to do:

    1x2x13' (I'm going 14') mounted so they stick out 2" from the boat. Clear ash, stained and spar varnished to match my gunnels. My raw sticks are coming from Superior Hardwoods on the Old Steese in Fairbanks; Daniel is great to work with there.

    My instructions say bolt it 12" on center; I'm going about 16", using carriage bolts pushed through from the outside, so threads appear on the inside of the hull. On those threads I'm mounting D-rings, then nuts with red loctite. I'll silicone each hole full before pushing the bolt through. I'll sand flat the outer part of the rail where each bolt goes, so the carriage bold head isn't sticking out there.

    Rails start 55" back from the bow, and run 6" below the gunnels. I'll probably start 50" back from bow since I'm going 14'.

    I'll shape them roundy like, and probably take the front of them down a half or three quarter inch, tapering.

    I'm looking forward to having 24 new D rings on the inside of my Albany to help strap down my load.

    I'm still looking at a week or two before I take delivery of my clear ash, so if anyone has some course corrections for me, don't be shy. I haven't done this before.

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    I have my freighter upside down at the moment,I have a lot of little scratches and 3-4 deep little pits/gouges. I'm a bit concerned about these,maybe I shouldn't be though.I'm going on my 3rd season with this freighter, do the glass freighters require alot of maintenance/ upkeep? Do most re-do the bottoms of there freighters every couple years? Any idea's of what that would cost to and repaint and repair the complete bottoms?Pat sent me gel coat repair with hardener and color match, it has directions but doesn't say what the temperature has to be, I also read somewhere that once repaired it should be covered with plastic wrap until it cures.Not sure if that is correct as my instructions don't state that.

    thanks

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    Just follow the directions and no need to wrap. You should do it in a heated garage but put a 2x4 under the garage door and place a fan down there to blow out the stink. No extra heat required. If the scratches cut through the glass then you might want to put a small patch of cloth and resin over it before you gel-coat. Check with Pat but I think your HB is made of polyester resin not epoxy. You can get the cloth and resin at your local auto parts store. I hope to travel up there soon since I'm on week number 10 of a 6 week estimated delivery date on the JB. Maybe I could take a look if you haven't fixed it by then.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boud'arc View Post
    You can get the cloth and resin at your local auto parts store.
    I'd check with Mainer on the best cloth to get. He's tried to 'splain it to me but only part of it made thru my thick noggin. There's (at least) two different kinds. I know I don't know but I know he knows.

  19. #19

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    I bought a 13-14' 1X4" ash ripped it to 1 X 2"'. Pre drilled the ash, tapered the front edge to 3/4", finished wood.


    Then cut spacers to set my drop from gunnell top to where I wanted spray hull on boat. Had aprox 5 clamps to hold
    spray rail to boat.

    Started in the back and drilled first hole, bolted it then, moved forward clamping using spacers, and bolts
    to bend rail around boat.

    Went back and siliconed all bolts and rail. Used 2 bolts at both ends ash did not want to bend lots
    of tension. Clamps,spacers,& pre drilling, and a good helper were key.

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    got all the little dings sanded and new gel coat applied,seemed to work ok. I am now going to order Kevlar strips and have them applied to the 3 keels on the HB.So they will be better protected and should avoid any more little pits and holes from those darn rocks and gravel

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