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  1. #61
    Member Abitibi101's Avatar
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    Hello from Quebec...!

    I've just joined the Alaska Outdoors Forums...... and as i'm interested by photography, i choose this post........!
    Fantastic......... wonderful pics and very talentuous teller...!

    Thank's for sharing, but please.... tell us more....!

    Regards,
    Ghislain
    P.S.: Excuse my bad english.... i'm a french Canadian..!

  2. #62
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default Location Location Location

    Photography is all about being in the right location.. .. at the right time, and if your smart.. .. you will have a camera so that.................??? you can show other people, what YOUR eyes have seen & recorded.

    What can you do with that image you captured ????? It is as endless as your imagination and the amount of work and dedication you can devote to becoming successfull.



    Many times in the past I would leave the ice and return just hours later with wonderful 11 x 14 prints enlarged & processed back down to the ice.

    This has to be a first !!!



    Many miles out on the ocean ice. I stop to greet people on their way down to the ice. We stop and chat and I show them the newest images that have been processed, the ol fashioned way using chemicals and light sensitive Kodak color paper.

    This image was early April and at night.. ZZZzzz!



    Nothing in the Arctic is done in the manner or way that you are accustom to. This is a different planet. A different world, frozen, extremly cold & windy. But it is the greatest adventure I have yet to experience, this is what keeps me here @ the top of the world.

  3. #63
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Great pictures Dave.

    kingfisherktn

  4. #64
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    Default more to it

    more to alaska than fishing villages ... I think I might be one of the only photographers in alaska that really never wants to go a to a village to take pics ..

  5. #65
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Lets take a trip and explore some of the land here in the Arctic.


    some of what I am about to tell you will seem preposterous, but just ask ANY PERSON that lives in any village from
    Nome clear up to Barrow, all of the villages of the entire North Slope Region, will tell you that what I am about to
    TRY AND EXPLAIN is "true". Do I have photos ? not yet, but working on it, there has to be a way to prove this.
    with recent giant advances in technology I am sure it will become possible to "catch" & record proof of the
    Ignaugalurauks.. .. The Little People, that live underground, and in caves here above the Arctic circle.
    This is no legend, or folklore, as new sightings are prevelant constantly, each and every year.!!
    I will tell you stories and provide photographs of all that "can be seen" in this vast huge expanse of area of
    several hundred thousand of square miles. THINGS HAPPEN OUT HERE.. .. ... ... that just do not make sense!!
    For instance.. ha ha.. you are NOT GOING TO BELIEVE WHAT I AM ABOUT TO EXPLAIN.. you have to be here to experience
    these happenings, no matter what I type, you will be very skeptical and doubtful ONLY because.. you know better,
    this does not happen where YOU LIVE.
    therefore: ??
    Lets start.. .. at the beginning so you have a better understanding of what is going on up here.. .. frequently,
    reports abound.. .. in each and every village!! This is a vast area we are talking about in square miles.
    roughly the size of ALL the New England STATES put together.. .. EMPTY !!
    Ok.. nOW A Long TIME before the whaling companies arrived .. .. .. The Ingnakalaurak's LIVED AMONG the people of
    Point Hope.
    One of their young was eaten by a dog.. .. and they moved out of the village. These people are small, 3-4 feet in
    height!
    They live the ol ways, to this very day, dressed in caribou skins. They still hunt with bow & arrow. They live
    underground, and in caves all throughout this vast area.
    They possess super human qualities, that you WILL NEVER BELIEVE:
    They are incredibly strong and they can run, incredibly fast.. they sneak around the villages "stealing food".
    When any hunter, shots and kills a caribou, it requires two adult Inupiaq men to lift that caribou to place on a
    sled. It only takes ONE Ingnakalaurak to pick one up ...........and RUN WITH IT. Over his head (person carrying
    animal) running, with a dead caribou. ??? Bush Pilots have reported seeing caribou.. moving, quickly, in a
    horizontal position ???
    Well, lets stop right here and let me extend an invitation to you. Anyone, come on up here, talk to the bush pilots.
    They will tell you.. what they have seen with their own eyes, but you will not believe them, becuase, YOU KNOW
    BETTER. even though you have never been up here or heard of this before.
    Come on up !! See and experience it for yourself.
    HAVE I GOT YOUR ATTENTION NOW ?? good. I have no need to lie or exagerate about any of what goes on up here. I have
    no problem with the truth however I do have a huge problem with Liars and phoneies. that is why I stay up here in
    the Arctic.. Heaven on Earth. IMHO.
    Luke Koonuk was out hunting many miles from Point Hope, Imagine this, you travel hundreds of miles into a vast empty
    area, Luke's 4 whell honda was stuck in the mud. He had tried and tried and tried to life or get it out of the ruts
    to get free. He was exhausted bent over huffing and puffing, Exausted, bent over,.. .. suddenly out of the corner of
    his eye he sees,.............His honda rise in the air and come bouncing down on firmer ground and somethibng, a
    blur, was running away.
    When ANY HUNTER IS LOST.. .. .. stuck. .. .. in trouble.. these people appear out of no where to assist and wisk
    away..Gone in a flash.
    TOO MANY people up here have had too many experiences,.. .. !! I could go on and on with stories of what goes on up
    here and I promise to tell .. all I have experienced during my almost 3 decades of living among the Inupiaq peoples.
    Hunters, experienced hunters often talk about caribou that they have shot & killed. Dead. & it disappears before
    they reach it.
    Make no mistake, these people are very good in what they do, they are perhaps the best hunters in the world.
    Jump on a 4 wheel honda or a snowmobile, and go 200 miles out into this empty region.....@ 50 below zero and stay
    out there for weeks... YOu see a caribou and shoot it, it falls down, motionless, they wait and watch. have a
    smoke. wait and watch. We do not waste time out here, driving. gas is too expensive. well over 5,00 per gallon for
    years up here.
    That caribou is dead, said Joe Oktillik, I got on my machine and drove over those hills,. and ?? where is it? I
    know this is the spot, there is no blood anyplace, no tracks to the left or the right and no tracks going straight
    ahead...The last place I looked Joe said.. .. was up ! Caribou is gone, no tracks??????????
    This happens a lot up here.
    I am not going to waste time here tring to convince anyone. Come on up.. .. go out there.;. and see what happens. I
    can be your guide. Or connect you to a reputable source. The best time to come on up here, is in June during whaling
    festival, in Barrow; I live here now, and I am inviting any and all that wish to see, experience, life in the
    arctic. Although my house is small, I can comfortably fit 4 people @ any time. I have two spare rooms in my two
    story house here in Barrow Alaska. There are 5 adults living in this toasty warm house and two rooms to spare for
    any who wish to visit the Arctic @ the top of the world in Barrow. There are also a few hotels in town, but they do
    not offer free home cooked meals,5 times per day if necessary !!!
    So lets talk about "what goes on up here in the arctic... ... ...
    STRANGE THINGS YOU WILL NEVER BELIEVE!!!!
    there is so much more to come.!!!

    This plane ride to Barrow is 400 miles from Point Hope, a four hour flight, A hundred dollars per hour to fly.


  6. #66
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default PolishX

    Well the Bush Pilots do not need rehab, they are very skilled in what they do and they are not going to lie.

    TOO MANY PEOPLE: are witness to these events, when sober out on the tundra.

    I can see the great depth of wisdom in each of your posts.

  7. #67
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Smile Nice pics...

    Wonderful pictures. Thank you so much for sharing. Thank you moderators.

    Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  8. #68
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default Inupiaq Values

    Unfortunately these images are not the size I had hoped for:
    and thus the "english" is difficult to read. so for those who can't understand the Inupiaq words I will post the english translation below :



    COMPASSION
    Though the environment is harsh and cold, our ancestors learned to live with warmth, kindness, caring and compassion.





    AVOIDANCE OF CONFLICT


    The Iñupiaq way is to think positive, act positive, speak positive and live positive.





    LOVE AND RESECT FOR OUR ELDERS AND ONE ANOTHER

    Our Elders model our traditions and ways of being. They are a light of hope to younger generations.
    May we treat each other as our Elders have taught us.




    COOPERATION

    Together we have an awesome power to accomplish anything

  9. #69
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default Inupiaq Values Part deux




    HUMOR


    Indeed, laughter is the best medicine!





    SHARING
    It is amazing how sharing works. Your acts of giving always come back.





    FAMILY AND KINSHIP

    As Iñupiaq people we believe in knowing who we are and how we are related to one another. Our families bind us together.





    KNOWLEDGE OF LANGUAGE
    "With our language we have an identity. It helps us to find out who we are in our mind and in our heart."
    Lee Barger, 1986 Iñupiat Language Convention.

  10. #70
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default Inupiaq Eskimo values part trez




    HUNTING TRADITIONS

    Reverence for the land, sea and animals is the foundation of our hunting traditions.





    RESPECT FOR NATURE

    Our Creator gave us the gift of our surroundings.
    Those before us placed ultimate importance on respecting this magnificent gift for their future generations.




    HUMILITY

    Our hearts command we act on goodness. Expect no reward in return. This is part of our cultural fiber.


    SPIRITUALITY

    We know the power of prayer. We are a spiritual people.

    Always giving thanks to the creator of all things!

  11. #71
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default nice pics...

    Very positive pics. Thanks for sharing.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  12. #72
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default TOP OF THE WORLD - Barrow Alaska

    Hello Hello from the land of the Eskimo - in Barrow TOP of the WORLD.
    Here is perhaps the most well known site in the entire village, The Arch of the two Jaw bones from a Bowhead Whale.

    But these were put here, not by the people of Barrow.. .. People of Point Hope came up here to show and help them how to do this in the ways of Tikigaq ! in 1964.
    An Elder informed me of this little tidbit of info about the Arctic. Ron Oviok from Point Hope. He was my former landlord in Point Hope, In one of the many different homes have rented in the village.
    Its that time of year again, it is time to go whaling.. new skins need to be put on those umiaq frames !! Clean skins or the whale will not give up its gift to the hunter of its choice.
    New skins are hanging, drying in the wind. To stretch and stretch and sewn together to cover that wooden frame.

    These are thousands of years of age old traditions that must be strictly adhered to. The whale can see, hear, smell. They know the personality of that hunter. They know his umiaq each and every year, the same whales with the same hunters in the same umiaq. Whales are SMART. they will only give up the sacrifice to the hunter of its choice.

    Everyone has had a whole year to get ready. That Captain must spend many thousands of dollars to feed his crew and provide the supplies, ammuntion, meals for 8 hunters many times each day. There is lots of very difficult hard work to do out on that ice. If you want a much closer view of Barrow by the best there ever was up here. Bill Hess is most respected person up here. He lives in Wassilla but has made many trips to Barrow in his own private plane. The Gift of the Whale by Bill Hess - a MUST READ ! that will keep you utterly spell bound. I now know how you feel when you read this thread. I felt the excitment all over me reading his exceptional book 289 pages with oodles & oodles of fascinating images that had me breathless page after page. (Gasp !!)
    I was shocked .. .when I found out, we each began our quest in the same year. In fact when he was in Point Hope in 82,after the hunt I was in the darkroom processing all this film, we have never met. but his name is a 'legend' and well respected at that.
    We have spoken on the phone years ago, But this book is wonderful. and he verifies many of the stories and customs that I have written about. I felt like I was beside him the whole time. I will read - reread and read that book many times. The rush was incredible !!

  13. #73
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    More photographs.. and more stories, that is the number one request !




    I have lots of new photos of whaling festival here in Barrow this year ! will post them very soon.

  14. #74
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default children of the Arctic

    Children fascinate me; to capture their faces, their innocence is amazing in their countenance. the intensitiy at play, laughter is so common, and some children are just plain bewildered.. !!



    I am perhaps the first white man this child has ever seen and the bewilderment is obvious by the look on her face. !!

    eye see you, is the 'title' I have given this next image. I just love those beady lil eyes taking you right away into that image. It is August 55 degrees out, but the wind is what makes it necessary to always be prepared for sudden weather changes, anything can happen very quickly up here.. .. .. with no warning !



    Yes walking around with a camera, finding subjects to create images of has always been a passionate hobby, that turned into something much bigger than I ever thought possible. The children of these villages are our main concern. I am so tired of hearing that same sentence in each and every village. From Kotzebue - Point Hope clear up to Barrow, the expression is the same for all of these children.. " I am just being bored". We ( me and my four sons) want to do something to change that. We have a goal, a vision, an impossible dream.. to build and install 9 different "YOU--niversities" for these children.



    I smile big whenever I see this image, it was a wonderful day and these 3 children were just laughing so hard and so much, I presented them with fresh biscuits that just came out of the oven. I love to bake bread, and fill the house with a most delicious smell. and give the biscuits away !! I am well known all over the village for making the 'best' as most women often tell me. One woman came over 4 times to learn how. I do all the steps the same way she insisted. but they just do not have the same 'taste' that yours have. I know why I replied !! she said what do I have to do. I said your hands are very tiny. you have to get your husband mad.. and make him pound that dough with his huge hands and his strength. That is the only thing I can possibly think of .. that would make the dough 'different'! she laughed hard and said.. I will do that !!



    To create an image of a child that is just so relaxed and comfortable, even when sitting on rocks,.. .. requires some tricks.. Keep that child relaxed by talking their language. Such a pretty face. Alyssia Grace Eves
    My grandaughter. !! One of two !!

  15. #75
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default Whaling Festival in Barrow 3 more to post !


    Boxes and boxes of frozen fish are brought to the festival site, It took less than two minutes to unload this huge trailer and setup the boxes on the table for everyone to partake of more of themany different native foods served here today

    Tony Bryant (Point Hope) is here in Barrow, asking this young whaler who old he is. The merging of the wood in the background and the woman raising her two fingers make this image perplexing and interesting indeed.
    Tony Briant is an 'actor' in a new movie about Barrow that was recently made here.
    In January, filmmaker Andrew Okpeaha MacLean, originally from Barrow and Fairbanks, walked the red carpet with familiar Hollywood faces at the Sundance Film Festival. His film, which in English means "On the Ice," was chosen as one of 83 special selections of short films out of 5,000 films sent.
    More recently, the film collected awards for screenplay and directing at the First-run Film Festival at New York University, where MacLean completed his graduate studies.
    Inspired by Sergio Leone and other Western filmmakers in the 1950s and 1970s, "Sikumi" is an "Arctic western" featuring a fictional treatment of a real-life situation.
    Apuna, the lead character in this Inupiaq-speaking film, crosses the sea ice several miles north of Barrow on a dogsled when he witnesses a community member in the act of murder. Isolated from anyone and anything, both men face tough questions about their morality "outside the bounds of society," according to MacLean.
    "I was thinking about how the characters would react to this situation and how they would react as Inupiaq people, taking into consideration our concepts, values .
    "'Avoidance of conflict,' this is how this character would deal with this situation," MacLean said.
    "He wouldn't try to subdue the killer but tries to find way to bring the killer to realize the magnitude of what he's done — bring justice within himself."
    All three men playing in this film are local actors from Barrow. Brad Weyiouanna plays Apuna, Tony Bryant, with family ties to Point Barrow and Point Hope, plays Miqu, and Olemoun Rexford plays Taqi, the murdered hunter.
    MacLean wrote the film as his master thesis project for the filmmaking program at NYU.
    This is MacLean's second film to appear at Sundance. His first film, "Seal Hunting with Dad," or "Natchiliagniaqtuguk Aapagalu" in Inupiaq, was a documentary inspired by MacLean's grandfather's life and was screened at the New York Museum of Modern Art in April 2005.
    MacLean's films are primarily shot in Alaska and focus on the Arctic and the Inupiaq culture. While living in Barrow before leaving for film school, MacLean co-founded the first Inupiaq-speaking theater company. Both Rexford and Bryant had acted in the theater prior to making films with MacLean.
    MacLean has dedicated himself to promoting the preservation of his Native tongue.
    Familiar with the language from home but not a fluent speaker, MacLean taught himself the language with the help of his mother Edna Agheak MacLean, who is a well-known linguist. His mother also helped translate the film's script from its original English version to Inupiaq, according to MacLean.
    "Most of my generation grew up around the language but couldn't really speak it myself, and I was feeling something was missing," MacLean said.
    "I tried to teach it to myself and tried to find ways to use it — one of the ways that has been effective is in theater and film pieces that I make," he said, "I want to get it to be used in a more public way as part of the media."
    "Everywhere you look there is pop culture reference to Eskimos, but no one has seen Inuit culture as expressed by Inuit people," MacLean said.
    "People are very curious about it and definitely respond to that."
    MacLean's next goal is to make a full-length feature. He is working on the script for that project.
    Another project under the works is a documentary film about the effects of global warming in the Arctic.

    The servers assigned to each crew walk around to make sure everyone receives a portion of the many varied types of food prepared for this event. Mikigaq is the main delicacy served. This food is dangerous to eat. Just make sure you have not had any sugar products that day. It is possible to die from Botulisim if you have sugar in your system and you eat this food. I always smile and say 'no thank you" I'll pass on this treat !

  16. #76
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default

    Many different types of soup are available,
    Fresh caribou soup,
    Fresh duck soup of many different varieties !


    Just be patient and wait, Food is served where you sit. You are waited on by many servers that are part of each ot the two crews that were successfull this year in receving a whale.
    some of the elders even bring their own favorite bowl, to make things easier for the servers that are passing out food to everyone that is here at the festival grounds.

    There are three more festivals for Barrow this year. the 26th - 28th & 30th. Hurry if you want to visit and enjoy a day you will never forget !!

  17. #77
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    Default

    [QUOTE=Majik Imaje

    Sent you PM last night!

    kingfisherktn

  18. #78
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default

    Now fast forward 2008 - Barrow - Whaling Festival !

    Barrow does everything 'different' from Point Hope.

    whaling is different, festivals are different, Point Hope (Tikigaq) is the oldest of all villages and as such they strictly adhere to and employ all the age old traditions that the elders insist upon. Centuries old, Millenia Old traditions, ingrained into their unique lifestyle / culture that must be studied and understood for their wisdom.



    Here we are for the first of four festivals held in Barrow this year. These images were created on June 21 of 08. How hot is it where you live ? Here in Barrow it is 50 degrees. that sounds very warm but it is very cold. As you view some of these images, you will easily see and discern that people have their hands hidden (for warmth). The wind is bitting cold, keep your ears covered, ear infections are extremly common here for adults & children alike. The wind will change many times during the day, Wind is a must to learn and understand here, out in the tundra or on the ocean ice, that wind is the key to survival, Death is what awaits if you ignore the warning signs of wind. In the village itself, you are protected from the elements of disaster which are significent in other locations, i.e. Ice movement(s), the freezing rain, ice storms, etc.

    Each whaling festival, no matter which village, begins with prayer and thanksgiving . Food & drink is the main course for many hours & hours. Then blanket toos and Eskimo Dance. the festival day is over and it ends.. except in Point hope. it goes on for 3 days non - stop for all practical purposes. Rosemary Oviok (86 year old elder) says that in the old says. they would stay out there for those 3 days. no matter what the weather, rain, snow, sleet, freezing rain, they stayed and gave thanks and celebrated!



    Handing out food, waiting in line, servers serving the elders first. Coffee,Tea, Hot chocolate is constantly brewed in these two tents that you will see. Hundreds of people are present for the day's activities, Barrow has a population of 5k give or take, But in comparision, very few people attend, not quite what I had expected at all to see. In Point Hope, Everyone shows up. plus visitors from all over the states and all over the world.


    The weather will change constantly here in the Arctic. When those flags are not moving, Something is about to change, suddenly, watch, learn !!



    One of the most common indicators of how cold it is outside, look at peoples hands. study the way people are dressed for 50 degrees ! that is very hot for the arctic, with no wind. Once that wind is moving, the chill from the ice, as the wind blows over it, makes it very cold outside.!!!

  19. #79
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default Whaling festival (Nalakutaq) -Barrow 2008


    Boxes and boxes of frozen fish are brought to the festival site, It took less than two minutes to unload this huge trailer and setup the boxes on the table for everyone to partake of more of themany different native foods served here today

    Tony Bryant (Point Hope) is here in Barrow, asking this young whaler who old he is. The merging of the wood in the background and the woman raising her two fingers make this image perplexing and interesting indeed.
    Tony Briant is an 'actor' in a new movie about Barrow that was recently made here.
    In January, filmmaker Andrew Okpeaha MacLean, originally from Barrow and Fairbanks, walked the red carpet with familiar Hollywood faces at the Sundance Film Festival. His film, which in English means "On the Ice," was chosen as one of 83 special selections of short films out of 5,000 films sent.
    More recently, the film collected awards for screenplay and directing at the First-run Film Festival at New York University, where MacLean completed his graduate studies.
    Inspired by Sergio Leone and other Western filmmakers in the 1950s and 1970s, "Sikumi" is an "Arctic western" featuring a fictional treatment of a real-life situation.
    Apuna, the lead character in this Inupiaq-speaking film, crosses the sea ice several miles north of Barrow on a dogsled when he witnesses a community member in the act of murder. Isolated from anyone and anything, both men face tough questions about their morality "outside the bounds of society," according to MacLean.
    "I was thinking about how the characters would react to this situation and how they would react as Inupiaq people, taking into consideration our concepts, values .
    "'Avoidance of conflict,' this is how this character would deal with this situation," MacLean said.
    "He wouldn't try to subdue the killer but tries to find way to bring the killer to realize the magnitude of what he's done — bring justice within himself."
    All three men playing in this film are local actors from Barrow. Brad Weyiouanna plays Apuna, Tony Bryant, with family ties to Point Barrow and Point Hope, plays Miqu, and Olemoun Rexford plays Taqi, the murdered hunter.
    MacLean wrote the film as his master thesis project for the filmmaking program at NYU.
    This is MacLean's second film to appear at Sundance. His first film, "Seal Hunting with Dad," or "Natchiliagniaqtuguk Aapagalu" in Inupiaq, was a documentary inspired by MacLean's grandfather's life and was screened at the New York Museum of Modern Art in April 2005.
    MacLean's films are primarily shot in Alaska and focus on the Arctic and the Inupiaq culture. While living in Barrow before leaving for film school, MacLean co-founded the first Inupiaq-speaking theater company. Both Rexford and Bryant had acted in the theater prior to making films with MacLean.
    MacLean has dedicated himself to promoting the preservation of his Native tongue.
    Familiar with the language from home but not a fluent speaker, MacLean taught himself the language with the help of his mother Edna Agheak MacLean, who is a well-known linguist. His mother also helped translate the film's script from its original English version to Inupiaq, according to MacLean.
    "Most of my generation grew up around the language but couldn't really speak it myself, and I was feeling something was missing," MacLean said.
    "I tried to teach it to myself and tried to find ways to use it — one of the ways that has been effective is in theater and film pieces that I make," he said, "I want to get it to be used in a more public way as part of the media."
    "Everywhere you look there is pop culture reference to Eskimos, but no one has seen Inuit culture as expressed by Inuit people," MacLean said.
    "People are very curious about it and definitely respond to that."
    MacLean's next goal is to make a full-length feature. He is working on the script for that project.
    Another project under the works is a documentary film about the effects of global warming in the Arctic.

    The servers assigned to each crew walk around to make sure everyone receives a portion of the many varied types of food prepared for this event. Mikigaq is the main delicacy served. This food is dangerous to eat. Just make sure you have not had any sugar products that day. It is possible to die from Botulisim if you have sugar in your system and you eat this food. I always smile and say 'no thank you" I'll pass on this treat !

  20. #80
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default Governor Sarah Palin

    Many different types of soup are available,
    Fresh caribou soup,
    Fresh duck soup of many different varieties !

    Just be patient and wait, Food is served where you sit. You are waited on by many servers that are part of each ot the two crews that were successfull this year in receving a whale.
    some of the elders even bring their own favorite bowl, to make things easier for the servers that are passing out food to everyone that is here at the festival grounds.


    There are three more festivals for Barrow this year. the 26th - 28th & 30th. Hurry if you want to visit and enjoy a day you will never forget !!
    June 30th The Governor of the Great State of Alaska arrives for Blanket Toss
    Introducing Governor Sarah Palin
    Yes it is true. The Governor of the State of Alaska is on the blanket, she is pregnant so they had to be gentle ! Go Sarah go !! The weather was perfect, a most spectacular day indeed. Up she went, just a few feet. Into the air and back down safely. The crowd around her was massive, it was dificult to even begin to get close to where she was, Immediatly upon her arrival she was swarmed from all directions. This brilliant woman has done something no other governor in the U.S. has ever attained .. 86% approval rating ! That is unheard of .. .. .. in any state by any governor ever !! That was just the most wonderful news item to hear over the television on the news !! I stood up and applauded !! Its about time we have someone who knows the importance of telling and speaking the truth. I am so sick of having to put up with people that choose to lie, to impress others
    .


    It is no easy task to maintain your balance when that blanket is moving up and down, learning how to walk the blanket takes much practice. Governor Palin exhibited her true skills in her first attempt at nalakutaq !!Bending her knees when she landed prevented her from falling over. Good show Governor !! Atta Girl !!



    The crowd was pressed on all sides, people wanting to get close to this incredible woman, who has shown the people of Alaska that she truely cares about the people of this Great State of Alaska.

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