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Thread: Kit or inline?

  1. #1
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    Default Kit or inline?

    Ok, here goes...

    I am thinking of taking the plunge into black powder and have a couple questions.

    I like the appeal of the old school cap and ball or flintlock style shooting, but the price of those rifles is high. The inline guns can be had for under $300 (under $200 in some cases) and this is more of what I can afford.

    However, you can get a hawken style kit for under $300. Do these actually shoot well, and if so, do they shoot well enough to take game with?

    Also, I am a lefty. Does this have any impact on shooting black powder? I know with some right handed semi-auto's I get hit in the forehead with hot shells. Wondering if I have to worry about getting a dusting of hot powder in the face since I shoot on the left.

    I will be signing up for the muzzleloader class in April so I will have a chance to shoot each kind of rifle.
    Just a bitter Alaskan clinging to his guns and religion.....

  2. #2
    Member e45colt's Avatar
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    I'm a lefty like you and still pretty new to black powder......years vs decades like some here. There are several options from Lyman that might fit your needs. Good luck.
    Afflicted by condition human

  3. #3

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    Lyman kits are wonderful guns, you can't go wrong there. Though I believe they run slightly over $400 so it may be higher than you're wanting to go. Cabelas Hawkins are actually really good guns as well, I've had one for 8 years or so and have killed quite a few deer with it. You can get them in an unfinished kit as well, but I'm not certain on price (cheaper than Lyman I'm sure).

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    I got into inline hunting years ago to avoid the limited range of shotguns in deer country in the wide open areas of the midwest, but other than being one shot, I'm not sure it really counted as muzzleloader hunting (it was deadly up to more than 150 yards with a scope). But, it did extend the seasons available to me throughout several states over the years. 12 years later, I'm looking more into a Hawken style kind of rifle. I've shot my father's and buddies' extensively, and although the range with round balls or conicals will never compare to a 44 slug in a sabot, I found them much more fun to shoot and closer to the experience.

    This was my progression with muzzleloaders, but certainly not the only way to go. You can definitely get some great accuracy for less with inlines, but I like the feel of the wood guns more and am ok with the limited range and trickiness of finding the right load and taking care of the gun in wet weather compared to a synthetic inline. The way I started, I liked the quickness of dropping powder pellets and a sabot down the muzzle, then slapping in a shotgun primer and having it go off every single time with great accuracy no matter how wet it was, however, I'm more into a limited weapon now, and look forward to a decent hawken. Perhaps this was the progression of many other muzzleloader hunters out there as well. Surely they will chime in.

    Also, I'm a lefty as well, and haven't had any issues, but there are many on here that have handled more guns than I that may be able to point you in the right direction.

    No matter what, you do, it is fun.

  5. #5
    Member OffTheRecord's Avatar
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    Depending on your taste and what you intend to hunt you might want to look at:

    http://www.middlesexvillagetrading.com/MENF.shtml These Indian made guns are tough but can sometimes take so much work that they are described as "assembled kits" but still they can be a lot of gun for the price. They are smoothbore.


    thumb_MBR_rightA.JPG

    Since you are left-handed you might want to call Deer Creek Products (no e-mail or web) (765) 525-6181. They have been good to me. Aska about their "scratch&dents" as well as kits.

  6. #6

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    "Don't sweat the small stuff." Many of the conventional "HAWKEN style" muzzleloaders are made with left handed locks. Many have kits with left handed locks.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the info and tips.

    Much appreciated.
    Just a bitter Alaskan clinging to his guns and religion.....

  8. #8

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    Sorry to be late in responding. I'm on the road at the moment.

    I own both inlines and traditionals. For me Alaska use hinges on the fact that you can't use scopes during the special muzzleloader hunts. That takes away any advantage of the inlines, so mine gather a lot of dust while my traditionals see a lot of use. It's sure a whole lot more interesting to hunt with things you made yourself, so I'll vote for going with a kit. If you've never built any before, the Lyman kit is hard to beat for price, quality and ease. If you're a little more handy and want to spend a little more, the style options go way up when you buy a kit from TVM. As for flintlock, I'm using them more and more rather than cappers lately. Just another challenge and another reason to shoot more in the off season.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    "Don't sweat the small stuff." Many of the conventional "HAWKEN style" muzzleloaders are made with left handed locks. Many have kits with left handed locks.
    RIGHT,

    SW in Wasilla had some lefty, MLs made by Traditions.

    The only thing I like about Inlines is that Pictures of them make fine targets for my Traditional style guns.

    Heh, Heh,
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    RIGHT,

    SW in Wasilla had some lefty, MLs made by Traditions.

    The only thing I like about Inlines is that Pictures of them make fine targets for my Traditional style guns.

    Heh, Heh,
    Smitty of the North
    So I take it you prefer the more traditional style?
    Just a bitter Alaskan clinging to his guns and religion.....

  11. #11
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    Yeah, I do.

    To me, Inlines are just a way to get around the Original Purpose, of ML hunting seasons.

    There's no romance, or historical reference, to them. It's just a way for people to get in more hunting time, without the challenges of Muzzle Loaders.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  12. #12
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Inlines are just a way to get around the original purpose of ML hunting seasons.

    There's no romance or historical reference to them.
    +1
    an old style ML is a thing of classic beauty.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  13. #13

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    If you go traditional, I would try to get a lefty. I noticed a lefty traditions in SW fairbanks today. I have a lefty cabellas hawken, and I have to say it shoots as good as I can. It has been my only muzzleloader so I can't say if I lucked out with it or it is the norm.
    I traded for a scout today which is a style of inline, but it is not plastic and to me looks a little more like a rifle. lol
    I won't know for sure if I like it for a week or so.

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