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Thread: Home Emergency Preparedness

  1. #1
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Default Home Emergency Preparedness

    http://pgward.org/ep/

    Here is a great website I found for home preparedness awareness that covers food storage-water purification-etc

    I place it here instead of in global discussion so everyone can see it.

    In lieu of todays conditions, its a good time to get you thinking.

  2. #2
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Thanks for the link. Here is a link to blog about preparedness.

    http://justincasebook.wordpress.com/

    and how to affordably build up a store of food that will feed you for 30 days without requiring processed foods or cooking.
    http://justincasebook.wordpress.com/...-your-pennies/
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member Blue Thunder's Avatar
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    This all sounds good and I think I'm going to start collecting a little of the dried foods and caned fruit. After reading about the whole grain red wheat and it's benefits I'm real curious about this. Does anyone know how best to eat this whole grain? I would think that you would loose some of the benefiters if you made bread or pancakes out of it. Anyone know of a way to eat this grain where you are eating mostly just the grain, other than just taking a hand full and eating it? Also where can this whole grain be purchased?
    Retirement Plan - Having Fun and Still Learning

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    The best ways to eat whole grain wheat are the pre industrial methods that are recommended by the Weston Price Foundation. They recommend soaking or sprouting beans and grains for increased nutrition and decreased anti-nutrients like phytic acid. Grinding grains is ok as long as it is done within a few days of consuming. You can purchase a home grain mill, look for either a hand powered or combo electric/hand power. Then in an emergency you will still be able to use it.

    I'm not sure where you could purchase the grain locally.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    This thread would not be complete without these sites...

    http://www.ready.alaska.gov/

    http://www.ready.gov/

    Even though they are government sites, they do have some good planning info.
    In particular, I like this 24-week plan for building a 7-day emergency food stash. You can naturally increase the amount of food stored, but it is the concept that is spot on. Here's a direct to the pdf download...

    http://ready.alaska.gov/outreach/DHS...ival%20Kit.pdf

    If that doesn't work for any reason, it is linked from the bottom of this page...

    http://www.ready.alaska.gov/prepare/default.htm
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Member La Pine's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting this here. I have a bug out all packed and ready to go if need be, hope others see the need too. Thinking that the government will take care of them is pissing in a deep hole.
    Quote Originally Posted by chico99645 View Post
    http://pgward.org/ep/

    Here is a great website I found for home preparedness awareness that covers food storage-water purification-etc

    I place it here instead of in global discussion so everyone can see it.

    In lieu of todays conditions, its a good time to get you thinking.

  7. #7
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by La Pine View Post
    Thanks for posting this here. I have a bug out all packed and ready to go if need be, hope others see the need too. Thinking that the government will take care of them is pissing in a deep hole.
    Your Welcome! Let just hope, we never have to depend on it. Piece of mind is a wonderful thing. Don't forget to rotate your stock.

  8. #8
    Member junkak's Avatar
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    Great thread!

    Just ordered a variety of Mountain house to supplement our existing food storage. Also a nice dutch oven (lid doubles as skillet) and an emergency crank radio/noaa weather/flashlight/ cellphone charger.....more on the way

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    My family just ordered a huge supply of beans and grains (to add to our existing supply that we cook with daily). Another thing that I would definitely recommend (if you are able) is to look into getting chickens, pigs, cows, and/or goats. We have chickens and goats, and it is so nice to have fresh eggs, cheese, and milk. And it's really nice to know exactly where our food is coming from, and knowing that they haven't been mistreated and infused with all sorts of nasty chemicals. We really don't know what the future holds, and who knows how long grocery stores may be around (maybe they'll stay, maybe the won't) But no matter what happens, it's best to be prepared.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by akwildrose View Post
    My family just ordered a huge supply of beans and grains (to add to our existing supply that we cook with daily). Another thing that I would definitely recommend (if you are able) is to look into getting chickens, pigs, cows, and/or goats. We have chickens and goats, and it is so nice to have fresh eggs, cheese, and milk. And it's really nice to know exactly where our food is coming from, and knowing that they haven't been mistreated and infused with all sorts of nasty chemicals. We really don't know what the future holds, and who knows how long grocery stores may be around (maybe they'll stay, maybe the won't) But no matter what happens, it's best to be prepared.
    The problem with the animals is that you have to feed them too, unless you have a lot of land that is. And in Alaska, growing food for the critters doesn't necessarily work out either, e.g. how much land do you need to grow chicken feed and how do you plan on processing the grain? If you're going to have animals, you have to store food for them as well and use your property and nature around you to supplement as much as possible. We have just one acre... that means storing feed for chickens and forget the larger animals (but keep the gun and ammo handy ...nature provides big grazing animals for us!)

    Brian

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