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Thread: new gun cherry popper

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    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    Default new gun cherry popper

    Sorry in advance for the dumb question... I just never spend much time around rifles. I recently purchased my first "big game" gun. When I take it to the range for the first time, do I want to use the bullet that I assume will be in the gun on its first hunt this spring, or is there a trick to sighting in a rifle without shooting bullets that cost two or three dollars apiece?
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


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    Member bnkwnto's Avatar
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    Buy a couple of boxes of the cheapest ammo (same grain) you can find. Shoot them to get your gun on paper and to get familar with the rifle etc. Just make sure you rezero with the ammo you plan on hunting with. It shouldn't take more than a few shots. Make sure you shoot it out to your max range so you know how much drop it will have (don't rely on charts).

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    You want to practise with what you plan to use.
    different bullet shapes and weights have great variables.
    Accurate shooting dictates an accurate rifle with accurate ammo (consistant) and a well practised shooter.
    If you can NOT place the shot, its useless.

    I hunt for a living with a Mosin Nagant and shoot about 4 880 rd cases of ammo every year, most in practise and for fun, a few rounds are shot while out hunting.
    I found the ammo/rifle combo that is wicked accurate and stick with that exact load, every time.

    I know my rifle so well I named 'em "Awsome".......ammo is about 7cents a pop.......and thats awsome too

    If your worried about costs, you should reload.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    Thanks a bunch. Do you think 150s in 30-06 will be enough for Mr. Black Bear? For someone who isn't planning on reloading, are Federal Premiums the way to go? I know they make a good duck load.
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


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    Quote Originally Posted by SkinnyD View Post
    Thanks a bunch. Do you think 150s in 30-06 will be enough for Mr. Black Bear? For someone who isn't planning on reloading, are Federal Premiums the way to go? I know they make a good duck load.
    Generally speaking, I've always found the Fed Prem loads to be quite accurate (various calibers) when I didn't have time or inclination to work up a load myself. 150 gr in an 06 is fine for black bears.

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    Member mekaniks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    Generally speaking, I've always found the Fed Prem loads to be quite accurate (various calibers) when I didn't have time or inclination to work up a load myself. 150 gr in an 06 is fine for black bears.
    I agree... I tried lots of the various over the counter ammo for my .338 and Federal was the most accurate and closest to the advertized velocity that I could find without going to the special order "custom" ammo. I used it lots of success for a couple of years before I started to handload. And yes, many many black bears have been killed with 150g bullets out of a 30-06. Practice, practice, practice.......

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    You might want to concider the 180gr for all around and get the most out of your rifle.The 150gr is more in line with 308
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Skinny,
    First off if the rifle is scoped here's what you do. Get the gun solid on sand bags, set a target out at 25 yards then look thru the scope and look thru the bore. Make your scope adjustments to line up the bore and scope. That will save you a few shots. Then shoot at 25 yards and make final adjustment.
    This should be very close to zero at 100.
    Hope this helps and good luck.

  9. #9

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    I have taken several moose and bears with my 30-06 I always shot 165gr. remington coreloks they have always worked very well and are not too pricey

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Go to Sportsman's Warehouse and buy some Remington CoreLokt 180 grainers. They were less than $20 a box and they will kill black bears and moose just as well as anything. To sight in I will put the gun in some sort of rest so that it doesn't move, a cardboard box with notches cut in each end will work in a pinch. Put a target up 20 yards or so away. Remove the bolt and look down the barrel and get it to where you are pointed at the bullseye. Now look through your scope. Move the cross hairs of the scope so that they are also pointed right at the bullseye. Now, you will likely move the rifle so you will need to do this a few times to get it right. Now, set your target at 25 yards and shoot one good shot. Note where it hits. Most scopes will move 1/4" at 100 yards per click, look at the scope knobs it should say. You are trying to get about 2" high of the bull at 25 yards. However far off of the 2" above the bull mark you are you are going to need to move the scope 4 clicks per 1/4" to get it right. Shoot one more shot to check where you are at and one shot at a time until you are 2" above the bull at 25 yards. Once the rifle is sighted in at 2" above at 25 yards move your target out to 100 yards. You should easily be on paper and if you are good an lucky you will be about 2" above the bull at 100 yards also. Move your scope until you are. A 2" high group at 100 should sight you dead on at 200 yards. After that, burn up that 5 boxes of ammo that you bought at $20 a box and practice
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    I like the Federal Classics because they cost less and kill just fine. Personally I've never had a gun group the Federal Premiums well at all. Yes, I realize the differences in guns and likely it was just my luck of the draw. So far I've seen no reason to spend more than a buck a bullet, and normally less than that, but then I've stocked up on ammo over the years and have not had to buy at today's inflated prices.
    As for bullet weight, anything coming out of an 06 will kill a black bear over bait. There is some sense though in just choosing one bullet weight for everything and sticking to that. For your rifle I'd go w/ the 165 or 180gr.
    I know you are a bird hunter. Your shotgun would be a good choice over a bait also. If for some reason you had to follow up a bear in thick brush I'd rather have that than the rifle.

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    You don't need anything over 165 Gr bullet out of a 30-06 IMO. Find what works for you and stick with that load and be sure that you stick with that load. You seem new to the whole deal but 150's will be fine for anything you want to kill but 165's would be better for an all round bullet weight. You will have people swear up and down and try to tell you that you cant kill a moose using anything under a 220 grain premium bullet out of an '06. Half the time they don't know what they are talking about. Just remember its all about Bullet choice and shot placement. Well good luck to you and keep ahold of your brass. You might find someone who can load all your once fired brass for you or trade it on alaskalist.com or something.

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    Take your Rifle and scope into a locally owned gun shop and ask them to bore site it for you. They will have it real close without ever firing a shot. If you buy a box or 2 of ammo or a sling or other small items, most times they wont even charge you for there service.(this is what sets them apart from the big box stores). If they do charge it will only be about $10.
    Once it's boresighted take it to the range and make the final adjustment and fine tuning. Use a good rest and hold her steady as you squeeze the trigger slowly.
    180 grain Remington Core-lokt ammo is all you need for Moose Black bear Caribou, and Yes with a well placed shot Brown bear.
    Good luck and have fun!

  14. #14
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Skinny,

    I have a boresight and a leadsled, I will be working up some handloads over the next few weeks and would be happy to help you out. You can even use my rest to fire while I let my barrel cool off. I will echo what others have said, 180grain would be my bullet weight of choice for the 30-06 and I have had great results with Federal Premium and they are my first choice when I buy factory loaded ammo.

    Have fun with your new toy.

    Steve
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  15. #15

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    I went to a black bear hunting seminar in the early 80's and the guy putting it on had shot 22 black bear with a 150 grain bullet from a 30-06. It was a 3 a year limit on them then and no meat salvage requirements. I wish it was still that way here as I like moose meat better then bear meat. This guy said he always shot for the lungs and it worked great, I don't remember the bullet. The 180 grain Nosler Partition 30-06 bullet is hard to beat as an all around load for the 30-06 and should be easy to find. That bullet has been around for ever, has a very good reputation and will be killing stuff forever. If you were in Kenai I would show you how to put a set of bases, rings and a scope on your rifle and bore sight it. It is so simple I can do it and something you should learn to do. You can Google it and print the instructions. Maybe some one close to you will assist you. Sighting a rifle in is easy and I hope you have some one with experience with you on your first couple of range trips.

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    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    Goodness, that's really more help than I expected. You folks are always so good about that, and I do appreciate it. I've got the scope mounted and a friend bore sighted it, so I suppose I'm ready for the range (just in time for 35 degrees this afternoon, fingers crossed).

    Here's another opinion question.... is there much truth to the idea of breaking in a rifle or is that an out-dated thing from the days when rifles actually had burs and nicks in the barrel?
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


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    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak River Rat View Post
    I like the Federal Classics because they cost less and kill just fine. Personally I've never had a gun group the Federal Premiums well at all. Yes, I realize the differences in guns and likely it was just my luck of the draw. So far I've seen no reason to spend more than a buck a bullet, and normally less than that, but then I've stocked up on ammo over the years and have not had to buy at today's inflated prices.
    As for bullet weight, anything coming out of an 06 will kill a black bear over bait. There is some sense though in just choosing one bullet weight for everything and sticking to that. For your rifle I'd go w/ the 165 or 180gr.
    I know you are a bird hunter. Your shotgun would be a good choice over a bait also. If for some reason you had to follow up a bear in thick brush I'd rather have that than the rifle.
    Would it be worth it to get a short barrel (18.5 or 20") and carry the 870 along for that purpose?
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


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    Yes there is a way to brake in a barrel. Midway USA sells some bullets that have a special compound on them its kind of like different sand paper grits. This stuff is called Bore Lapping compound. It is used to clean up the tool marks in the bore. I have never used it I figured it was only for match grade rifles but people do use it. Now if you have a custom rifle it might have already been done for you. but here is the way you break in a new gun.......
    Conventional Break-in various sequences of shoot and clean using conventional ammunition to burnish the irregularities in the bore and throat surface finish for example (commercial new barrels):
    1. Clean rifle prior to first shot--ignore accuracy and just shoot.
    2. Clean after every shot for the first 10shots.
    3. Clean after every other shot from 11 to 20 shots.
    4. Clean after every 5 shots from 21 to 50 shots.
    5. After 50 shots, completely clean and you are ready. Do not over heat the barrel less than 1 shot per minute

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkinnyD View Post
    Goodness, that's really more help than I expected. You folks are always so good about that, and I do appreciate it. I've got the scope mounted and a friend bore sighted it, so I suppose I'm ready for the range (just in time for 35 degrees this afternoon, fingers crossed).

    Here's another opinion question.... is there much truth to the idea of breaking in a rifle or is that an out-dated thing from the days when rifles actually had burs and nicks in the barrel?
    I always take my cleaning gear to the range. A jag with a patch will tell you quick if you have a rough barrel and they are much easier to clean while the barrel is hot.

    If you do have a rough barrel, each time you fire a round it will tranfer more and more copper to the barrel with each shot.

    Have fun

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkinnyD View Post
    Goodness, that's really more help than I expected. You folks are always so good about that, and I do appreciate it. I've got the scope mounted and a friend bore sighted it, so I suppose I'm ready for the range (just in time for 35 degrees this afternoon, fingers crossed).

    Here's another opinion question.... is there much truth to the idea of breaking in a rifle or is that an out-dated thing from the days when rifles actually had burs and nicks in the barrel?
    I think that it's worth metioning that alot of knowledgeable people do believe that it is not necessary. That being said, I break my rifles in by shooting slowly(one shot every 2-3 minutes), and cleaning after the first and fifth rounds. that's it. I am no expert.

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