Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: COL for 300WSM

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    105

    Default COL for 300WSM

    A friend came over and we loaded 40 300WSM cartridges to a COL we found on the Hogdon gunpowder website. When he got home and tried to load them, not a single one would load as they were all too long.

    So I thought I would ask what all of you experts have found to be the right COL for the cartridge.

    Specific info -
    Powder - H4350 - 61gr
    Bullet - Hornady 180gr BTSP
    COL - 2.850

    Interestingly enough, when we loaded 1 cartridge with a 180gr SST, it loaded. I am thinking the COL should be somewhere around 2.80.

    What say all you reloading experts? Murphy?

    Thank you much in advance.

  2. #2
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    Kirov,

    How's the 500 doing?

    When you say they wouldn't load do you mean in the magazine or the chamber?

    What were the bullets that wouldn't load?

    You have one load with an SST and it will chamber? I would say that is because it is more tapered (longer ogive) and full diameter if farther back than with other bullet styles.

    I think the official max length of the 300 WSM is 2.860", I'm going from memory here, and some magazines are limited to 2.800" Some chambers will be dimensioned differently also.

    I guess I need a bit more info to run this one down.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    105

    Default

    Murphy,

    The rifle is a Remington Model 700 and we are using Winchester Brass with the Hornady BTSP bullets.

    Cartridges loaded fine into the magazine but the bolt would not close without using considerable force.

    Speer website says OAL is 2.78 and the Sierra book says 2.80.

    All of the powder loads that we see are at the 2.860 OAL specified. If we are needing a shorter OAL, like 2.825 or shorter, will that make a considerable difference in pressures? Should we reduce the powder load for those shorter cartridges until we shoot a few?

  4. #4

    Default Ogive

    Take a loaded round and close the bolt and extract the unfired round. Check the bullet it sounds like your driving the bullet into the lands of the barrel. Check the bullet for marks or groves where the lands contacted the ogive of the bullet. This could cause excessive pressures.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    There is the length that fits in the magazine, and then there is the bullet to land depth in the throat of the chamber.

    When I start working with a new bullet in a given chamberin, I'll seat the bullet long in an empty case and use the bullet to drive the bullet into the case to the find the into the lands seating depth of the bullet, and keep this as a reference. I'll start my load work by setting up my seating die with this reference, then set the seating depthin in 0.010" to 0.025".

    Depending on the shape of the bullet and the dimensions of the chamber, you can't always load to the max length of the magazine.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kenai, AK
    Posts
    196

    Default Brass sizing?

    Could it be that the shoulder of the brass needs to be bumped back a smidge and not the bullet hitting the lands?
    I haven't messed with just neck sizing, and have always just full length resized my 300wsm brass. I do remember reading about guys, who just neck sized, having problems with rounds chambering as the shoulder was moving forward a little too much. Think it might have even been brought up on this site.

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    90

    Default

    My COL with my 180 Interbond is 2.885" with a M70, Your Remington if the bullet is touching the lands at the COL you said seems to be pretty short. I would defenitely double check to see if the bullet has marks on it , if not its the case shoulder needing bumped back a bit.

    md

  8. #8
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    905

    Thumbs up 300 Wsm

    Been reloading the 300 WSM about 2 yrs now.
    Win 70 SS

    Nosler 180gr AB @ 2.880"
    180gr Speer GS @ 2.780"
    180gr Fail Safe @ 2.760"
    Hornady 180gr IB @ 2.885"
    180gr Sierra GK @ 2.800"
    Nosler 180gr Part @ 2.886"
    Barnes 180gr TSX @ 2.890"
    Sierra 165gr BTHP GK @ 2.800"

    IMR 4831 excellent powder and WLRM primers in WW cases
    180gr Fail Safe and max load of 760 good heavy game load.
    Med Game load 165 Sierra BTHP w/IMR 4831 max load 69.5
    Alaska

  9. #9

    Default

    Did you neck size them or full size them. I would check to make sure the brass is resized correctly. An easy way to do this is take a black perm. marker and color the whole piece of brass (no bullet). Chamber the resized brass and then look for scuff marks in the black marker. If they are around the shoulder the brass isn't sized right. Also you can check the fully loaded round like mentioned before. If there are marks in the bullet you are hitting the barrel. But bullets that are too long usually don't make the bolt hard too close. They will just push back into the brass unless you have a crimp on them.

  10. #10
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    When you say very tight to close the bolt that makes me think it is brass related and not bullet depth.

    I have seen a bunch of new brass that was, for the guns I was trying them in, too long to the shoulder dimension. That means headspace was not enough. Several of these were WSM calibers but none were 300 WSM. Normally any caliber's new brass will chamber in a rifle of the same caliber. To test this if you have a piece of empty brass from this same batch, see if it will chamber. If it is also tight or won't close, you have a rather tight chamber or a long lot of brass. Full length sizing will fix it. You would need to pull the loaded rounds to do this.

    If this is used brass that was fired in that gun, it definately should go back in. When resizing fired brass that will go back in the same gun, it isn't necessary to full length resize. Usually partially sizing in a full length die will do it. However if the brass was fired in a different rifle, it will most likely have to be full length resized to go in your rifle.

    One other thing, you didn't mention crimping. If you crimped these the neck may have bulged slightly and this could be a problem. Close examination of the rounds will show this though. If that is the case, don't shoot these, that could boost pressures up.

    By seating a bullet slightly (.050") deeper in the case won't be a problem as for pressure. Jamming a bullet in the rifling would cause higher pressures and a wrinkled neck could be worse.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  11. #11
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    905

    Thumbs up Full size

    I tried neck sizing but had a hard time seating the bullet correctly, went back to FL resizing, I have a Hornady Bullet seater.....really like the floating sleve in the seater.

    The neck is too short to neck size for me.

    As far as hard bolt, just turn your sizer die down a 1/4 of a turn, and that sure cure it.
    Alaska

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •