Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Steel Cases: Reloadable?

  1. #1

    Default Steel Cases: Reloadable?

    I was out and about today and found a handful of "Wolf" brand .45 auto cases scattered on the ground. They are made in Russia of mild steel, and appear to have a light coating of varnish or some other such rust preventive. The primer appears to be a standard large-size and is NOT a Berdan type....just single flash hole like normal. What are the pros and cons of trying to reload these, or other, steel cases? I'm curious...


    Marshall/Ak
    "I love my country...it's the government I'm scared of"

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    You might find this video informative. Good info just skip the last minute.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Mbf4C-8ViM
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    Yeah, you can but why would you want to? I don't have first hand experience in reloading steel cases, well I did load a couple just to see if it would work, but I think it would be hard on dies. The steel may work harden faster than brass and would rust if not recoated. The only reloadable steel cases I have found have been in calibers that is easy to get brass for so I don't see why you would want to.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    They will get harder once fired and will not resize very well. If you ever get one stuck in the die you will wish you would have never tried reloading steel cases. They are hard on the die's as they are hard on the chamber of you rifle.
    I still shoot a lot of them because they are cheap but they are still hard on the chamber. They will start rusting pretty quickly after you fire them so itís hard to keep them clean from rust.

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default

    I reloaded them in .30 carbine and .45 ACP years ago to see if it could be done. They worked O.K. as I recall.

    Reason to reload them would to get around the weak link of the brass case esp. in a .45 ACP. I would also expect the case capacity to be significantly larger also. So in theory one should be able to shoot a hotter load in a .45 ACP and maybe other calibers limited by the strength of the brass.

    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    Yeah, you can but why would you want to? I don't have first hand experience in reloading steel cases, well I did load a couple just to see if it would work, but I think it would be hard on dies. The steel may work harden faster than brass and would rust if not recoated. The only reloadable steel cases I have found have been in calibers that is easy to get brass for so I don't see why you would want to.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    I suppose you could load steel to higher pressures for those guns where the case is the limiter but I don't think your gain would make much difference as to the effectiveness of the 45acp. I don't really know but I would think the added slide velocity would help shorten the life of the gun. They do make bigger guns if you need more power.

  7. #7

    Default

    Interesting comments. I suppose there could be a few reasons one might reload steel cases. For me I was just asking out of curiosity. Saw them laying there, and thought "hmm...wonder if these could be reloaded?", kind of thing. One reason to reload them might be to make yourself cheap ammo for one-time use only, where you have no intention of recovering the cases. Like when you are out on snowshoes or skiis out in the woods, and every shot you fire the brass flies totally out of sight into deep powder. It's frustrating and time consuming trying to find brass buried deep in the snow. In that scenario I wouldn't care if they work-harden more than brass, they wouldn't be reloaded again anyway. I would just load them to standard pressure....I think loading them hotter just because the case is (supposedly) stronger is asking for trouble. Like rbuck said, if you need more power then go get a bigger gun. I don't own a .45....I was just curious if anybody bothered reloading steel cases, and what problems they had trying it.

    Marshall/Ak
    "I love my country...it's the government I'm scared of"

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    The only reloadable steel cases I have seen have been 45,223 and 9mm. There may be others that I'm not aware of. But, as I have several thousand of each of these in brass, I think I will go with Sweepint and not risk sticking one in a die.

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I've never tried it, fortunately there is plenty of brass 45 acp cases lying around at the range to pickup and reload, I just need to train my kids better to scrounge brass

    As to running higher pressures in a steel cased 45 acp, that may be possible, but the issue with a 45 acp isn't just the case failing where it isn't support, higher pressures result in the slide coming back harder and battering the gun. Lots of reasons not to hotrod the grand old acp.
    Last edited by Paul H; 03-16-2011 at 10:11. Reason: posted before finished

  10. #10
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    . . .higher pressures result in the slide coming back harder and battering the gun.
    A change n spring rates would fix that though.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •