Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: warmest down sleeping bags

  1. #1
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Kotz
    Posts
    1,005

    Default warmest down sleeping bags

    anybody have a review or own a Bask sleeping bag? in particular the kashgar or karakoram model. they look really nice and have some impressive temp ratings -76 and -47 respectively. a little pricey but was wondering if anybody has used one. just checking out down bags and these looked interesting.

  2. #2
    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    480

    Default

    I havn't used it or that brand, but for the money I'd try a Wiggley's or less yet a Cabelas Outfitter. Unless your going Polar Bear Hunting.

  3. #3
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Kotz
    Posts
    1,005

    Default

    funny you should mention polar bears because they're right around where i live, however i have tried the wiggy's (i just bought my wife one) and just looking for maybe something different.

  4. #4
    Member KelvinG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna, AK
    Posts
    362

    Default

    I've been out at -20 in a Marmot sleeping bag and was nice and warm, (sleep real good actually). It is rated -40 and its a well known name. If you are really looking for an extreme weather sleeping bag I go with a brand name.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Kelvin

  5. #5
    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    480

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cjustinm View Post
    funny you should mention polar bears because they're right around where i live, however i have tried the wiggy's (i just bought my wife one) and just looking for maybe something different.
    I have the Cabela's Outfitter -40, I get cold pretty quick and this is a warm bag. But to heavey for packing the mountains.

  6. #6
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Kotz
    Posts
    1,005

    Default

    im not sure about the brand name...i think it may be a high quality bag its just not made in the us. i saw the kashgar model was around 800 to 900 dollars so im not too worried about some off brand p.o.s. just wondering if anyone had ever used them. I was looking for a high quality bag and these looked pretty dang nice. Multiple baffles to keep cold out and a pretty high down fill rate. I've always owned synthetic for the simple reason down is pretty worthless when wet however after purchasing a canada goose expedition parka ive never been so hot when its so cold outside so i figured down bags would be comparable. thanks for the info so far. i have also heard good things about the cabelas bags that you mentioned good stuff to know. thanks all.

  7. #7

    Default

    How much does a top shelf down bag sell for these days.......

  8. #8
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    6,617

    Default

    I have been using a down bag for the last few years for all my hunts to include coastal and float hunts. It is about all I use anymore. I store it in 2 layers of waterproof protection and sleep in it with a TI Goat bivy that weighs 6 ounces. On one hunt I get sick and sweated it wet and was still warm, the new down bags seem much more resistant to water than they once were.

    THIS IS MY EXPERIENCE, YOURS MAY BE DIFFERENT!!!!

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

  9. #9
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Kotz
    Posts
    1,005

    Default

    from the info ive been researching top shelf down bags are running more than synthetic a few from the more popular mainstream bags ie north face, marmot ect are running in the 5 to 7 hundred dollar range. im sure there are cheaper and also ive seen some that are more but either way they are a major investment but its better than freezing.

  10. #10
    Member Brian Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    931

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by cjustinm View Post
    anybody have a review or own a Bask sleeping bag? in particular the kashgar or karakoram model. they look really nice and have some impressive temp ratings -76 and -47 respectively. a little pricey but was wondering if anybody has used one. just checking out down bags and these looked interesting.
    This is a Russian mountaineering outfit. Probably pretty good bags that follow a European Standard so keep in mind that you need to pay closer attention to the ratings. There will be a comfort rating (think comfortable) and an extreme rating (meaning survival).

    Most any reasonable polar sub-zero designs, using great materials/components, with adequate volume of high quality Down insulation in certified power-fills 800+ to 850 should give you an excellent comfort rating between -20F to -40F and some to -60F.

    In the best of 100% Down Bags... a good way to look it:
    $700-$850 gets you to -20F and some to -40F
    $1000-$1200 gets you into -40F to -60F

    To my knowledge, nobody is realistically stamping out comfort ranges beyond these extremes, while others will provide an extreme range (that's very speculative at best).

    Are the Bask Bags good (even great)? Maybe-so... I have no experience on these particular couple of bags. They look to be very good.

    I'd also tell you that Feathered Friends bags are exceptional in every way for polar sub zero expeditions, and these would no question be my choice. I have two older FF bags still going strong long after top name synthetics have lost significant comfort range.
    Brian Richardson

  11. #11

    Default

    I have a Raging Inferno (North Face) Bag I would sell for $420.00

  12. #12
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska/Idaho
    Posts
    2,067

    Default

    Western Mountaineering is the standard for extreme cold weather down bags. You'll pay but get your monies worth.
    Marmot's -20/-30 Col is also a great bag. I had a new unused one and sold it to another forum member, he really likes it.

    The holy grail? Feathered Friends Valandre Thor rated at -58 and $855.

    Specifications:

    • Temperature rating: -58 degrees Fahrenheit
    • Insulation / EN Rating (degrees Fahrenheit): 850-fill goose down / -9.4 (T-limit); -50.8 (T-extreme)
    • Total weight: 4 lb 12 oz
    • Fill weight: 3 pounds
    • Shoulder / hip / foot girth: 60 / 55 / 36.5 inches
    • Fits to: 5 ft 7 in (Small); 6 feet (Medium); 6 ft 7 in (Large)
    • Shell material: Polymid ripstop / polyester ripstop
    Proud to be an American!

  13. #13
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    11,593

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I have been using a down bag for the last few years for all my hunts to include coastal and float hunts. It is about all I use anymore.

    Steve
    My wife and I have gone the same route, Steve. We're pretty much full-time down bag users now. I'll bring my synthetic if it's summer (my down bag is just too warm) or if I know that I'm going to be in a full-time deluge of rain, but I've never been the least bit disappointed with my decision to bring the down bag along.

  14. #14
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    3,316

    Default

    I just made the switch back to down this year after a decade or so in synthetics. I purchased Western Mountaineering and so far, couldn't be happier. Warmer and way lighter than my synthetics. I view all temperture ratings with a grain of salt, regardless of maker. Better makers are generally closer to comfort ratings.

  15. #15
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    6,617

    Default

    My sheep partner used a Western Mountaineering bag on one of our sheep hunts and he loved it, he did have to return one because it was too small, so you might want to try them on for size.

    Another thing I have started doing is leave a spare bag at base camp when feasible for the odd emergency or if you have to ferry meat back to camp it is nice not to have to carry your bag back and forth. Picked this tip up from Alaska_Lance, thanks Luke.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Another thing I have started doing is leave a spare bag at base camp when feasible for the odd emergency or if you have to ferry meat back to camp it is nice not to have to carry your bag back and forth. Picked this tip up from Alaska_Lance, thanks Luke.

    Steve
    Steve, well atleast I had something for you to learn. I pretty much got the good end of that deal on learning quite a few little tricks from ya.

    I have both Wiggy's and Western Mountaineering bags.

    If backpacking I pretty much just use my WM bags now for everything, except if I were to do a backpacking hunt on Kodiak, or SE AK. Even then I just feel like giving my Glacier hunter a walk. The wiggy's setups my wife and I use really only get used on trips where boats, wheelers, or sno-gos involved. Both are great bags and serve their purpose IMO.

  17. #17
    Member Timber Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Sovereign Mountain, Alaska USA
    Posts
    207

    Default

    In a normal year, I spend up to 60 days on winter expedition carrying what I need to survive on my person (which I would be doing right now, if I wasn't layed up sorry recovering from injuries). Pack weight and space being primary consideration and the harsh conditions make down filled bags almost a necessity. These excursions are conducted in some less than hospitable environments in the arctic regions of Alaska, Canada, and some other areas of the world with similar extreme dry cold, snow and high winds. Many of these nights are spent sleeping on the ground without shelter of any kind other than what natural wind protection can be found. Providing the situation allows, shelter is constructed with available materials e.g; quincy hut, snow cave, lean too, igloo, even a tent (preferred) once in a while. Thru the years of winter adventure travel and high altitude experience, I have utilized a few different cold weather sleep systems. Currently the two down sleeping bags that I regularly employ are a Valandre Odin and a Western Mountaineering Bison. I endorse either of these bags with complete confidence and without reservation (actually prefer the WM because I don't have to carry a Goretex over cover). I always use two ground covers a foam pad and a self inflating pad presently a Thermarest Z-lite on the deck with a Thermarest Prolite Plus on top. I have slept out when the ambient temperature has been as cold as -62F with windchill calculated at -110F. Some nights in the bag, fully clothed even with boots still on, not recommended, but situation dictates. Years past, I used various synthetic bags, two different Wilderness Extreme (don't believe they are in business at least not under that name) and the Wiggy's double bag system with a goretex outer bag. The Wiggys actually saved my life on one occasion, which I have related in a prior post. These synthetics were all rated for the coldest temps. I am a fairly warm sleeper (have actually slept like a baby many nights when mates with similar equipment have complained of being cold). Therefore, I might not be the best judge of sleep systems for the extreme cold, but, this is what has worked for me. YMMV.


    "AND YE SHALL KNOW THE TRUTH AND THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE."

    JOHN VIII - XXXII

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •