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Thread: Rafting /Camping equipment

  1. #1
    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Default Rafting /Camping equipment

    I will also post this in the Float Hunting Forum as well. Funny thing about other source of information that can be crossed utilized for the purpose of accomplishing our sport. My Daughter who gets Back Packer Mag received her new Gear Guide which of course most major mags come out with and yes they all have their different spins.

    One of the most debated subjects for rafting/hiking/hunting/camping is what gear works for what situation and some of the biggest topics are always weight, price, weather, and room.

    From Back Backer Mag equipment review:

    Tent 4 person - Big Agnes Copper Spur UL4 5 Lbs 10 Oz 3 season high country tent. On Average I use a similar tent and although less expensive it comes in at 11 lbs pack weight. I read the review got online and I think I just might have to try one this year. I do not believe it is a Moose Hunting tent come late Sept but will meet all other expectations and LIMFACS I normally would associate for what I do.

    This is the one I will try come heck or high water:

    Sleeping Pad -NEMO Astro Insulated with Pillow Top: weight 1 lbs 8 oz for the sleeping pad basically a 2.5 inch pad full length and Pillowtop 1 lb 9 Oz. for those comfortable take all trips. Combined I think most cot people will be able to save about 4-5 lbs and still meet that need of extreme comfort.

    Already have something similar however for 100 bucks with unlimited clean water I think I will try this:
    SteriPEN adventurer Opti.

    Last but not least the REI Snow and Tent Anchors. Simple enough and heck you could make your own if you wish. For those people who hunt the windy areas of the world with rocks available limited use of tent stakes is a good thing. Nothing like setting up camp and trying to wrap rocks with string to secure your tent. I will be purchasing about 10 of these. Don't know why I have not in the past!

    Any Who thought I would share.

    As with life Trust and Verify the data.

    Best wishes and have a Great ICE DOGS outdoor game day!

    Richard "moose" Mousseau
    BMR

  2. #2
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoose View Post

    Last but not least the REI Snow and Tent Anchors. Simple enough and heck you could make your own if you wish. For those people who hunt the windy areas of the world with rocks available limited use of tent stakes is a good thing. Nothing like setting up camp and trying to wrap rocks with string to secure your tent.



    The only downside with these is you need a big rock which is not always easy to find on a gravel bar. I use cheap but durable mesh bags from Campmor. They come in about 4 sizes. Just fill them with gravel (always in supply) and tie a simple overhand knot with the draw cord on the bag. This knot goes through your tent corners where stakes would go normally. Works like a charm and dirt cheap. I use them on all float trips and don't bother carrying stakes anymore.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___90544


    Below is a pic of our tent with the rock bags. The more the wind blows, the more gravel goes in them.




    Looking at the left side of the below image, you can see the 550 cord on the corners of the electric fence. I take about 8' of paracord, make a loop (which goes over top of fence pole), then on the other end attach to a smaller mesh bag (8"x10" or so) full of rocks. These go on all four corners. This holds the fence taught in high winds.

    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  3. #3
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    Danattherock's option is by far the lightest option out there. I will just interject something I have used that worked really well for me . I did a mulchatna bou hunt in 03 in very late september. I took with me a Kifaru paratipi with what they call SST ( snow sand and tundra) pins . They are basically 16-18 in piececes of aluminum conduit with an eye hook in the top end. They we very easy to get into the tundra due to there hollowed core. Durring that trip I had 60 straight hours of sideways rain and 85 MPH sustained winds recorded at Illiamna. The tipi was like a rock and never pulled a peg .Depth was the key here . You don't need every peg to bee that deep. Here is a link to my set up . I have been using the 12 man as a base camp set up for moose in the interior with a 4 dog TI stove and the whole set up comes in at 23 lbs with the stove and its a huge tipi.

    http://www.kifaru.net/paratipi2009.html
    Last edited by wildone; 03-12-2011 at 11:58. Reason: add the link

  4. #4
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I second that wildone. I have had my 12 man for about 10 or 11 years...I have not treated it well...it is kind of ugly at this stage of its life, but it is great with the stove in it for those cold nights and rainy days. The tundra steaks work very good if it is not rocky.

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