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Thread: First Aid Kit

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011

    Default First Aid Kit

    What items do you think or personally have in your first aid kit that you carry with you while you are afield hunting or fishing ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    NorthWest Alaska


    A basic fist aid kit of bandages, antiseptics, a tube of Bacitracian, burn cream inna tube, steri-strips, superglue, blood clotting powder, Tylonal, some 'tools' like a razor, sewing needles of all kinds, tweezers and a couple rolls of adhesive tape. Weighs about 1-1/2 lbs., but sometimes more than one person is hurt. Mines a little large, but I do S&R/Firedept stuff as well, so its with me in my travle bag.

    Get some basics to go with the kit if you havent had any training.....a good book is "Where there is no Doctor" and its companion, "Where there is no Dentist", both very readable, and a good start on basics.
    I'm a A current ETT, Though I was once a certifyed EMT (untill I can find a class), basic knowlage is your best bet in dealing with such. Dont wanna be reading the First aid book while yer patching yorself ,your kids, your friends.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  3. #3
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Anchorage, AK


    Few small bandades, few large bandades, few sterile pads and some duct tape. Sterile pads can be cut down smaller if needed and held on with duct tape. Duct tape has other uses as well including covering hot spots on feet to fight off blisters. Single packets of Tylenol, antacid, sterile wipes, and antiseptic. Tiny bottle of saline eye drops. Waterproof matches. Moleskin. Chapstick. Allen wrench for my scope rings. Maybe some dental floss and needle for multiday trips.

    I leave a small kit in each of my packs so I don't forget it.

  4. #4
    Member RCBOWHUNTER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006


    I keep my First Aid Kit very simple and light, especially for backcountry trips where weight is an issue. I believe there are 5 things to prepare for 1. Bleeding 2. Sprains 3. Fractures 4. Stomach Illness 5. Foot Care. Anything can happen but it's hard to prepare for everything that may happen. With that in mind I only bring things that have multiple uses. I bring Rolled Guaze, Ace Wrap, Duct tape, Super-Glue, Moleskin, SAM Splint (occasionally), and medication I can get from my doc prior to a trip. I cover Giardia with Flagyl and all other bacteria with Cipro. In addition I bring a little bit of Motrin or Naproxen. Some misc. items I will bring are small tweezers, chapstick, and safety pins. All in all very light, and multi-functional.

  5. #5
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    North Pole, Alaska


    I agree.
    I keep my First Aid Kit light as well.
    I am pretty sure that there is another thread about this on the Alaska Outdoor Safety, Survival, and Emergency Care section of Outdoors Directory.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Fairbanks, AK


    Duct tape - multifunctional. . . splints or sprains or bandage placement etc

    Foot care - moleskin and sometimes glacier gel type bandages

    Burns - glacier gel can be used but I prefer butesin picrate ointment (works as an anesthetic for flame or sun burns)

    Aquaphor - for those that have used with babies you know the value. . . a small tube is better than chapstick for lips/knuckles/other unmentionables

    Benadryl - I nearly learned the hard way to pack something for allergic reaction. After never having had a reaction to anything in my life, my eyes and hands began to swell significantly from biting gnats/flies. My face and hands were the only skin exposed, and they drilled me day after day. Fortunately my partner had some benadryl which I popped like candy to keep my eyes from swelling shut. Bear hunting with your eyes closed is not advised. If weight is not a big issue then an epinephrine pen would be nice for the party to have. Those that show anaphylaxis to bee stings are probably already carrying one.

    Anti-diarrheal - there are a variety of over-the-counter forms available

    Ibuprofen (advil etc) - the wonder drug. . . if on a deserted island with one choice for drugs this is what I choose. It is a pain and fever reducer that is also an anti-inflammatory. There are some who are sensitive/allergic and others with stomach/heart/liver etc issues where contraindicated. That is why many use acetaminophen (tylenol). If one is healthy enough I prefer ibuprofen.

    Dermabond pen - superglue works fine . . . . excellent for cuts/bleeding

    Antiseptic bottle - this is for major wound care like compound fracture/deep, large gash etc

    Steristrips/Band-aids/Triple Antibiotic Ointment/Sterile single-packaged, medium-sized bandages

    Antacid tablets - to combat the freeze-dried meals. . . or even the celebratory ones

    Satellite phone - I almost learned the hard way here too. It may be the most important piece of "first aid" equipment any of us ever carry. This is especially true for remote/wilderness hunting or solo endeavors.

    Pills in one ziploc baggy, tubes in a second, and small packages in a third one. All that's left (save the antiseptic bottle if desired) is the duct tape and satellite phone which I was taking anyway.

    Stranger had a good idea in the blood clotting powder too. I need to look into picking some of that up. I hope others will toss in their ideas. Previous conversations like this is how I've partially developed the kit that I take.

  7. #7
    Member mekaniks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010


    dont forget your medications, i.e. heart meds, asthma inhaler, diabetes meds, ect. Keep extra in your first aid kit and keep it with you. Had a friend snow machine break down this winter and he had to walk. His asthma acted up and he did not have his inhaler. He might of died if someone had not picked him up and given him a ride to his truck. I work ( & hunt) remote alot and it never fails that someone will show up without their meds, and its always a scramble.... A good first aid kit is important but has to have the stuff YOU WILL NEED. Bandaids aren't much help if you really need quickclot for a deep knife cut while skinning a moose and quickclot isnt much good if your kids need antidiareal & rehydration becasue they drank some bad creek water. Just like tylenol isnt going to replace heart meds........

  8. #8
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006


    Put all the below in a small waterproof bag and you will be set....

    For bleeds, Quik Clot (sponge not powder) for major bleeding. A few surgical staplers for lacerations. Some basic dressings, 4x4's, tape, elastic band-aids, etc.. Bacitracin for minor abrasions and such.

    For GI issues, giardia, etc.. Cipro, a cheap antibiotic your doc will give you a script for. Also, Immodium for continued diarrhea.

    For burns, a tube of Silvadene, a cheap script from your doc. Anyone that has ever tried to preheat a MSR whisperlite international while drunk will want this cream in their first aid kit. Don't ask.

    Flexeril (script from doc), a muscle relaxer, for pulled back/major muscles. Extra strength tylenol and a few Vicodin. If floating, you got to row out even if you pull a back muscle.

    Dental floss for meat stuck in teeth.

    Lubricating eye drops and saline (for flushing) in case you get something in your eye.

    A bag of Fisherman's Friend cough drops.

    A small bottle of anbesol for dental pain.

    Snake bite kit. Kidding.

    Throw some moleskin in as well for blisters from the new boots you forgot to break in properly.

    Little things that can make you miserable need attention as well


    "You don't need it till you do"

    -Goo Vogt
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.


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