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Thread: Bow hunting cert.

  1. #1

    Default Bow hunting cert.

    I need to aquire the bowhunting cert required to hunt some of the areas up here. Blows my mind that you need this up here. I'm and ASA national winner and have been a part of several whitetail deer management hunts within city limits in the lower 48 but now in AK the "last frontier" i need this? odd but i gotta play by the rules so

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    When I took the class Ed Bosco was teaching it and I enjoyed all his old stories and perspective on things. It may not be exactly what you would want to do with a Saturday, but it's not the worst way to spend one either - I enjoyed it.
    As a bowhunter I like having extra hunts or areas or seasons set aside for bowhunters only. If in turn I have to take a class to qualify for that it's fine with me.

  3. #3

    Default just my thoughts

    as ASA national Champ, the class/shoot should be a breeze----two/three days of your time to get a certification to hunt bowhunt only areas probably isn't to much to ask

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by turkeyhuntinfool View Post
    as ASA national Champ, the class/shoot should be a breeze----two/three days of your time to get a certification to hunt bowhunt only areas probably isn't to much to ask
    It's just a one-day thing. You can do the one-day class, or just do the online version where you do the "class" portion online, including the test, and then just show up for the proficiency shoot. Here is the information for anyone interested: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...ered.bowhunter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin4590 View Post
    I need to aquire the bowhunting cert required to hunt some of the areas up here. Blows my mind that you need this up here. I'm and ASA national winner and have been a part of several whitetail deer management hunts within city limits in the lower 48 but now in AK the "last frontier" i need this? odd but i gotta play by the rules so
    You should bring your trophy to class, I'm sure they will be impressed. Just kidding...a little. Anyways as an accomplished bowhunter, I'm sure you can understand why the requirement is there. Anyone can get a bow and go out and sling some arrows at a critter, but a little education cannot be a bad thing for anyone, including the critters and fellow hunters.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    You should bring your trophy to class, I'm sure they will be impressed. Just kidding...a little. Anyways as an accomplished bowhunter, I'm sure you can understand why the requirement is there. Anyone can get a bow and go out and sling some arrows at a critter, but a little education cannot be a bad thing for anyone, including the critters and fellow hunters.
    Also, to add to that, you have to look at just what hunts require the bow certification. Most of these are hunts that add opportunity on top of what is already out there for rifle hunters. Some archery hunts are in more heavily populated (by humans) areas such as on the base here in Anchorage or in/around the city of Fairbanks. You really don't want just anyone running around lobbing arrows when there are homes right next door. It is also a very touch subject with regards to injured animals running around with arrows sticking out of them from bad shots. We want to make sure those people who hunt in the more visible areas are responsible about it so we reduce the risk of losing what hunting opprotunities we do have. Certification certainly does not eliminate these problems, but it sure does reduce the likelyhood of them happening.

    In Alaska, you don't need the certification to hunt by bow in a normal rifle season. You only need it in the "weapons restricted" hunts. Those hunts are, for the most part at least, "weapons restricted" for a good reason.

  7. #7

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    I agree with everything you guys have said and I do see the need. its just mildly fustrating to have bowhunted for 20 years and have to take a class on it. I looked into it and and the april class is full so that puts it at May before i can get this done. Like i said I see the need and I deff do not want just any retard with a bow slinging arrows arround.

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    I took the class the on a day it was booked full too. I spoke with a woman at fish and game the day before the class and she told me to buy the course materials (10 dollars maybe - I can't remember) and then just show up and there would definately be openings because some people no-show for the class. Anyway, it was to be a full class but I still got certified before hunting season. Good luck

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I never turn anybody away and I always have no-shows.
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    I never turn anybody away and I always have no-shows.
    Thanks! I'll see you there then!

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    Which class ? Anchorage or Palmer? The best part of having an IBEP card is that it is good in all states. I am actually surprised that you haven't run into the need before moving here. I ended up getting my card so I could hunt other states that required it. The same happened with my hunter education card. I was exempt in Alaska, but not in other states, so I had to get it.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    AKDoug,

    Are you going to be teaching the April or May classes in Anc. I'm waiting on some new stuff to get here, and want to be comfortable shooting before I sign up.

    Brad

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    I generally help with classes in Palmer. However, it's just the same amount of a drive for me to get to Anchorage so I might be helping with some of those classes. At this point I haven't committed to anything in April or May. Zinker, if you are even a novice archer you won't have an issue with the practical shooting portion. Shots will not exceed 30 yards. You can use a rangefinder, but not share it. One elevated shot. 4 targets total, shot once from standing and once from kneeling. You must kill every animal at least once, and one animal twice. If you fail, most instructors will allow you to reshoot if time allows. I didn't have a single person in 2010 fail in the groups I ran through the course.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    I generally help with classes in Palmer. However, it's just the same amount of a drive for me to get to Anchorage so I might be helping with some of those classes. At this point I haven't committed to anything in April or May. Zinker, if you are even a novice archer you won't have an issue with the practical shooting portion. Shots will not exceed 30 yards. You can use a rangefinder, but not share it. One elevated shot. 4 targets total, shot once from standing and once from kneeling. You must kill every animal at least once, and one animal twice. If you fail, most instructors will allow you to reshoot if time allows. I didn't have a single person in 2010 fail in the groups I ran through the course.
    Do people use long bows at all? what "animal" are we shooting at? and how many shots do you have at each target?

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    Member Zinker's Avatar
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    Thanks AKDoug. I may even sign up for a class in palmer depending on when I can get in. What do you mean elevated the target or where I'll be shooting from? Thanks again.

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    Griffin 4590, if you have that much experience as a competitive archer, and a bowhunter, why not take the course, talk to the instructors, and then sign up for the instructors course yourself? New blood is always welcome in the volunteer ranks, and there are great guys doing the teaching now.
    I remember the class I took. There were a bunch of guys that seemed to know it all. Several talked about competition. My buddy and I were so scared we'd flub that we almost did not shoot. But being hard headed we went. Glad we did as there were several guys that had seemed invincible who failed, and we passed with flying colors.
    ARR

  17. #17
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Do people use long bows at all? what "animal" are we shooting at? and how many shots do you have at each target?
    You bet, we have traditional shooters often. Two shots at each target, four total targets, shoot each target once kneeling and once standing, must kill each animal (determined by the instructor not the scoring rings) at least once and one target twice. Animals usually include a deer, a caribou, a black bear and a mt. goat.

    What do you mean elevated the target or where I'll be shooting from? Thanks again.
    In Palmer we shoot down a fairly steep hill for one animal. In Anchorage you shoot from an elevated platform.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    I moved up here three years ago and took the test.During the lunch break I listened to the locals and asked a few questions and ended up walking away with info that put me right where I wanted to be on opening morning of moose archery on the Kenai pen.I plan on taking my 14 year old son through the course this year with instructions to learn listen and learn,especially during the lunch break.

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    I think a lot of bowhunters have that question, why in Alaska is it necessary for a seasoned bowhunter, but if you have a class like mine and there were three people who after the three attempts at the field trial were still missing the ANIMAL let alone the jill zone, your question is answered.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teagarden View Post
    I think a lot of bowhunters have that question, why in Alaska is it necessary for a seasoned bowhunter, but if you have a class like mine and there were three people who after the three attempts at the field trial were still missing the ANIMAL let alone the jill zone, your question is answered.
    That is why I will not take the test till I have practiced my heart out. Right now I am not consistent enough to feel comfortable taking the test let alone shooting at live game. I plan on hitting the range a lot this summer in order to gain the level of accuracy I need. I shoot a recurve and have been out of practice for too long.
    Just a bitter Alaskan clinging to his guns and religion.....

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