Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: gratuity

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    9

    Cool gratuity

    How much should I tip a bear guide for a 7 day hunt if it was good/bad?

  2. #2
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,457

    Default

    depends on how much the hunt cost, if you can afford it, if you think they deserve it, if they went above and beyond...so on and so forth .

    a gratuity is just that, a act of appreciation. decent tips are 10 percent of the hunt costs. bad tips are five percent, anything less than that don't give it, you'll just insult your guide.

    WHATEVER you do, don't, please oh please don't tell him you'll mail him a little soemthing when you get home!!! lol i heard that three times last fall....the ol' checks in the mail syndrom...as you may guess, the check never arrived. i don't care if guys don't tip me, but i do care when they lie to me about it to save face. be a man, give it or don't give it...you'll have more respect than lying about it.

    One guide i knew, said give till it hurts...

    if your guide is the one you paid for the hunt 5-10 percent is more than fair, if he's a hired guide and not the contracting guide i'd say 10 should be about right..if you liked your service. tip like you had dinner, food and service sucked..tips sucks...food and service great, tips great. same idea and if it really stunk don't tip...its up to you...no where does it say you have to...its just common practice like dining.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kodiak, AK
    Posts
    30

    Default Previous Tipping Post

    I found this in the old forums. Looks like there was a lot of discussion on it.
    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/akf...ting/18583.htm


    Gary

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chignik , AK
    Posts
    93

    Default

    How much did you tip your plumber? Use that as a guide
    How much did you tip the airline stewardess? Use that as a guide
    Get the idea?
    A waitress is lower income and depend on the tip as part of their income.
    The Guide that did the actual hunting, packing, cooking & making camp with you could be considered if his effort warrented.

  5. #5
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,457

    Default

    lol guides aren't lower income? lol better not tell that to denali kid care...
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  6. #6
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    It all comes down to what service was provided, and how appreciative you were for that service. If the guide provided the hunt of a lifetime and you want to show him your appreciation for that, then provide what you feel is appropriate. If the trip was miserable, tip appropriately to that.

    By one of the posters logic, if I go to a nice resteraunt and say spend $200 on the meal, I shouldn't tip as much as at place I spend $20. It all comes down to service, if the expensive meal was outstanding I'll tip upwards of 20%, if the service stunk I'll be hardpressed to leave anything more than a couple of bucks.

  7. #7
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    Pay what you can afford. Guide does a good job tip him. Does a poor job pay him less or nothing.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  8. #8
    Member Alasken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eastern Oregon
    Posts
    457

    Default tipping, not a city in china

    The reason this a tough question is because there is really no industry standard. Out of all the hunting articles I've ever read there isn't one I remember on tipping guides. Everyone knows what the deal is in a restaurant, but there's no standard for guides.

    I've heard the "certain percentage of what you paid for a hunt", and honestly don't agree with that. I've guided people on $15,000 hunts and wouldn't realistically expect a hunter to think that $1500-$2000 on top of what they paid fro the hunt would be reasonable for a tip. My friend who is the master guide I've worked for on the expensive hunts tells his clients he books that they should tip at least $500.....if their guide did their job! His guides all do their job.

    It's about service and how hard your guide works for you, whether you get an animal or not, if the guy works his butt off then he should get something on top of his pay.

    When I was running my own outfit I had one assistant guide and a couple camp helpers working for me. I made sure and told my clients to be sure and take care of the p[people who are helping them. All that worked well. As far as me guiding a client who I booked, I never thought I should get a tip. I told them I figured they already paid me for the hunt, I already got their money. Almost all tipped me anyway, but I passed a lot of it along to the people who were helping me.

    One thing I would like to mention is that a gratuity doesn't have to be in the form of cash. Early in the first year of my guiding my rain gear got torn to shreds in the alders. My sheep hunter handed me some cash, and I asked if him if he would give me his brand new rain gear instead. That saved my butt, and was worth more than money at the time. If there's something your guide needs, and it's something you have it's worth considering.

    I've appreciated every single tip I've gotten. To me that means I did my job the best I could. I've received a few things over the years that I still have too. The money was gone a long time ago. ;-)

    Tip what you can afford. If you appreciate what he's done for you show him some appreciation. It's pretty simple.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •