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Thread: 35 Whelen Pump for Alaska

  1. #1

    Default 35 Whelen Pump for Alaska

    I have previously owned a .270 Remington pump and it worked well for deer. I know lots of folks up in Maine/Vermont use the Remington pumps in a severe climate as well. What would you experienced Alaskan hunters think of a satin finished 35 Whelen for an "all-around" moose hunting, occassional caribou and bear encounter rifle? I realize that a bolt action most likely be more accurate, but that could potentially be offset by faster follow up shots on dangerous game. I have noticed lots of Alaskan guides carry large bore lever guns, any reason a pump would not work as well? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default

    It should work fine but it does have a few more exposed parts to freeze up. Watch the ice buildup and make sure you cycle the rounds through the action prior to going into the field.
    Pumps may not have the same amount of power to chamber rounds as a bolt action or lever action.
    Tennessee

  3. #3
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Use one

    Mine has been up here for seven years from the Bering Sea to Prince William Sound. It has always been flawless in operartion. Work up one good load such as a 225 grain slug and you should be good to go for anything. An extra bow of factory 250 grain round nose and you have an adequate brown rifle too.

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  4. #4
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    Default Rem 760's

    Two friends of mine brought their 760's/7600's in 30-06 up here from the Pennsylvania. We went out to PWS for bear, and they both got bear. Both of them use these pumps exclusively and are very familar w/them. No troubles.

  5. #5
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    Had a pump once and that was all it took to trade it off. Have several Whelan tools and think very highly of the cartridge.

    Here on Kodiak on certain days along about spring and fall when the rains come and it wants to snow? Water hits the components on all guns and I have actually had to bang a bolt from a bolt gun against a tree to get it open. Could not do that with the pump. Shotguns work just fine though and the bolt thing only happened twice in 30 years! I did have my first legit bear attack this summer as well !

    Just more food for thought

    Neal

  6. #6

    Default

    No getting around the loss of "camming action" from a lever or a bolt when simply using muscle power to cycle a pump. Even so, with good ammo that's more of a theoretical issue than a real problem. I've never had any problems with ice, but then again I'm a lefty, and when I carry the gun it's across my body rather than with the e-port exposed. Who knows. Could happen next time I get out in the cold.

    A whole lot boils down to your experience and habits. If your are used to pumps and like them, it will feel really natural. I have found myself trying to pump a semiauto shotgun after a few days using a pump. Even tried to pump my O/U once.

    I gotta say though, that I've always been impressed with the long line of Remington pumps. Starting with my old 141's in 35 and 30 Rem and up through a whole series of 760's in almost every caliber they made, I've never had a single jam of any sort or failure to extract. The caliber list includes the 257 Roberts- I feel really, really feel stupid for letting that one go!

    And then there's the Whelen. What's not to like there?

  7. #7

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    Thanks. I probably would not use it as a dedicated brown bear rifle but I thought it might be a good all-around choice for moose and possible grizzly encounters.

  8. #8

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    I wouldn't hesitate to use it that way. I regularly carry a Savage 99 in 358 Win, and the Whelen in a pump would suit be just fine.

  9. #9

    Default 7600 35 Whelen

    Have hunted with pump rifles since 76 never had one jam or give me any problems. Hunted with a 760 06 when I lived on Kodiak. Have a 35 Whelen
    in a 7600 that has taken 2 good bull moose with no problems. Have heard
    about the lack of extraction problems with reloads but never expericed any problem with good loads. The only negative is hold the forearm with slight tension to the rear while carring or it can rattle and spook game. Been using them so long now its second nature. I can shoot the pump better than most of my LH bolt actions. They are a ntural for a LH shooter that grew up with
    pump shotguns.

  10. #10
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Reloads

    As long as the case is the proper lenght and resized properly, extraction should not be a problem. I have some loads that are "auto-extracting". I call them grizzly loads. No pressure signs except ......... the auto-extracting part. They are 250 grainers with ?? grains of IMR 4064.

    As a lefty the 7600 is a natural pointer and duplicates the feeling of the 870 shotgun. If only the 7600 was made in stainless.
    Last edited by Daveinthebush; 02-27-2007 at 21:32. Reason: s

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  11. #11

    Default stainless

    I think Remington actually made the 7600 in stainless on some limited runs. I know they at least had that look to them and had laminated stocks as well. At the time, I thought they were ugly. Wish I could find one now.

  12. #12
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Nope

    They did a nickle plated, matt finish on the 7400 for a bit. Grices (sp?) gets some special runs now and then but I have never seen stainless. Browning did a run of stainless BLR's for a bit and some of them are around. If I found one in 06, I'd have it turned into a .35 Whelen.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
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