Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Running with the Wolves.....

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,636

    Default Running with the Wolves.....

    Heard a first hand accoun tonight, actually about 4 times, (Its a social thang) about a Very large Female German Shepperd that was shot from a pack of Wolves, South of Buckland a few weeks back.

    Raymond talked up his recent Wolves and told me how he was following his dad tracking a pack of 7 or 8, and when they were spotted by the pack, he picked the biggest to follow. The one he rode after (they spilt up when chased and reform later) dodged him and he couldnt get a shot. Unfortunatly for the animal it went the wrong way, and came running to his Dad , who dispatched her.
    I asked what they did with it , and he said it was just a dead Dog, valueless, and there were 'Real Wolves" to track down at the moment, so there it remains I guess. No laws against shooting Ferral Dogs Im sure.......

    Said it had a dogs nylon adjustable collar on as well, and very distinctly a female German Shepperd.....
    Living with wild Wolves......bet that ***** could fight .....

    This village is 60 miles from the closest village, and 70 miles to the second closest......pretty freekin unpopulated.

    Anyway, interesting, wish I had some pix......

    I wonder how much Dog/Wolf hybreeds are near highly populated areas in this state......???
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  2. #2
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Ak.
    Posts
    4,191

    Default

    Interesting story. Have encountered feral dogs living at and around the dump in Emmonak. No wolves around tho. One of our former area bio's thought wolf social behavior pretty much precluded dogs from making any inroads into cross breeding with wolves. Must happen now and then tho.
    Good the shephard was removed from the gene pool.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  3. #3
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Didn't Jack London write an entire book about this subject?

  4. #4

    Default Jack London

    I am pretty positive that Jack London was no expert on wolves or German Shepards for that matter. Maybe the fictional book, "Call of the Wild" is sticking in your mind??

  5. #5
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    That was my dog, code name "canine traitor" sent to infiltrate the enemy's social fabric and report their location coordinates to me on a daily basis...

    You guys just cost me 3 years of expensive dog training and the toughest/dummest dog on earth that I could find...



  6. #6

    Default

    I'm sure she drew much attention from the males in the pack....the females thought she was just a floozy tramp moving in on their guys. Was she wearing red lipstick and fishnet hose?

  7. #7
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Dogs bred out the Red wolf on the Texas coast in the early 1970's
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,636

    Default

    An interesting thing I have noticed, as well as asked and talked extensivly about is Wolf on Human attacks.

    Seems theres no local history or even old Eskimo storys in mememoy about Wolves attacking people around here. Even the best 'Wolfers' I know , as well as in my own experiance, is that Wolves are docial when the Ax is commin' litterally down, being dispatched in traps , snare and such.

    The only known deaths from Wolves in local history, comes from Rabid wolves, who infact bit and killed my father-in-laws, Father-in-law, Punnekok Sampson of Noorvik, back in the 30's.....and theres PLENTY of Wolves to be found up this way.....

    HOWEVER, in Eskimo Lore, Ferral Dog attacks from loose Teams and such were "The Ultimate Disaster" was being attacked by starving ferral Dogs, who have no fear of people whatso ever and as a pack are nearly undefeatable.

    Prehaps a Dog in the Wolf blood would make them less afraid of people and more likely to be a danger to people........my thoughts go to the unconfirmed (as far as I know) Wolf kill of a teacher in southern AK awhile back.

    Thoughts?
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  9. #9
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    South Central
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    ........my thoughts go to the unconfirmed (as far as I know) Wolf kill of a teacher in southern AK awhile back.

    Thoughts?
    The teacher died of injuries determined to be animal bites. The only tracks around the body were wolf tracts according to the locals that found her. Not too hard to draw a conclusion from that. However, with no dead wolf on scene with human parts in its belly we can always speculate that it was a levitating badger, or a pack of shrews that left no foot prints on the wind driven snow.

    One of the issues with wild animal attacks that end in death when there is not a witness, is determining which animal actually killed the person.

    The young engineer in Canada was found eaten by wolves, but did the wolves kill him or just finish up what a bear started? Only speculation except that there were both bears and wolves at the mine/camp dump.

    The hiker last year that was killed by coyotes in eastern Canada was confirmed since other hikers came upon the animals in mid attack, but could not save her life after running the animals off.

    The child at Icy Bay was seen to be carried off by the wolf by other kids and ended up dropping him once people started screaming.

    Over the centuries how many times have people came across a human skeleton on the tundra with scattered bones and clothing only to wonder "how did they die?" Without a survivor to bear witness we will never know what happened in most cases.

  10. #10
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kodiak, Ak
    Posts
    3,175

    Default

    Well these are just thoughts, provoked by an interesting subject,

    On the killiing of a Teacher on the Ak Penin. I've not heard that it was anything but easily confirmed as a wolf kill.
    Interesting, never heard any such rumor that it could have been anything else.
    Just mentioning that, as I spend a lot of time down there, hear some of the talk anyway,

    Also on the idea of Feral dogs on the AK Penin. I'd say chances are much lower than in northern AK where there is much higher use of dogs for transport etc.
    on the AK Pen, zero dogsledding that I know of, and that's a Very Sparsely populated area, with a few mongrel dogs around,
    Just thoughts as you asked for,
    It coulda been, but lot lower chance of it than up north I think

    I do remember Feral Dog Packs as an issue up around FBKS when there,
    had a college roomate doing serious study for his degree concerning Feral Dogs in the Interior,
    it was a concern of Biologists beginning to be seen clearly back then, '79-'80

    and Man, I despise those things, dangerously familiar with man, is right.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  11. #11
    Member bushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Now residing in Fairbanks from the bush
    Posts
    4,363

    Default

    Anytime that wild predators become habituated and food conditioned to humans they can pose a risk. I'm glad that ADFG finally moved to begin culling the wolves on JBER that were becoming evermore habituated and food conditioned and not wary of human presence.

    In Alaska and elsewhere, as suburbia and human activities on undeveloped lands expand, we also have instances of people being attacked by cougars, bears, wolves...who were biking or running. Those kind of activities can put you on animals all of a sudden without warning, which causes a defense response, or provoke a chase response. The teacher apparently killed by wolves on the AK peninsula was jogging with earphones on listening to music from what I heard, both of which surely increased the odds of an attack.

    Mark McNay, now retired from ADFG, wrote a paper on human wolf encounters in Alaska over the last 100 years. Used to be on the ADFG site, can't find it there now, but here is another link to it:
    http://www.pinedaleonline.com/wolf/pdf/mcnay.pdf

    Like Stranger said, wolf attacks are not really in the lore here either from old timers and elders or in Native oral histories. Unless it was rabid wolves, just don't hear about it. Now wolves killing dogs, on the other hand, lots of accounts of that, and have had packs try to get my dogs too in the past. A neighbor lost a dog to wolves, they ate it off the end of its chain. Happens around Fbks too on occasion.

    There are some accounts of lone wolves hanging around homesteads and dogteams, eventually to the point the human food conditioned them, and they even became somewhat domesticated, and bred with one of the dogs. Haven't hard of a dog being accepted by a pack, cool story Chip.

  12. #12
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Kotz
    Posts
    1,004

    Default

    should have skinned it anyway prob make a nice ruff

  13. #13
    Member Blue Thunder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    North of Anchor Pt
    Posts
    682

    Default

    I moved into the mountains of north west Wyoming about 35 years ago and had a female Husky. I could not brake that dog from chasing game for anything. I was an outfitter in the area and could not have this happening. The next trip to town (75 miles) I went to the vet and rented a shock collar and put it on the Husky, did not have any affect and even shaved a bare spot on her neck for the collar. She ran off with the collar, gone for 4 days so I figured she was going to cost me the expense of replacing the collar. Went to the local dump on day 4 and was watching a bunch of elk running about 150 yards away. A short distance behind was 6 coyotes chasing the elk, grabbed my gun and was going to get me a yot when I noticed about 50' behind the yots was my husky with that collar that was going to cost me if I did not get it back. Started to shoot the husky and thought I would howler at her and she what she would do. She stopped, looked at me and then came running to me. First time she had ever done that. She must of known she was dead if she did not come to me. She stunk like coyotes and dead animals. She must have been running with them for the whole time she was gone. Very surprised that the yots even let her close to them as other neighbors in the area had lost dogs to the yots. Strange to say the lest. I took her home and chained her up until I went to town next, took her and the collar to the vet. Collar rent was $45 and another $50 for the vet to take her and try and find her a home. Told the vet that who ever took her would have to keep her chained up or they would have the same problem. Will I guess he could not find anyone to take her so he put her down and then charged me for that. My conclusion on this experience is, that some times, for some unknown reason, domestic and wild dogs will mix.
    Retirement Plan - Having Fun and Still Learning

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Outta Big Lake
    Posts
    1,633

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    An interesting thing I have noticed, as well as asked and talked extensivly about is Wolf on Human attacks.

    Seems theres no local history or even old Eskimo storys in mememoy about Wolves attacking people around here. Even the best 'Wolfers' I know , as well as in my own experiance, is that Wolves are docial when the Ax is commin' litterally down, being dispatched in traps , snare and such.

    The only known deaths from Wolves in local history, comes from Rabid wolves, who infact bit and killed my father-in-laws, Father-in-law, Punnekok Sampson of Noorvik, back in the 30's.....and theres PLENTY of Wolves to be found up this way.....

    HOWEVER, in Eskimo Lore, Ferral Dog attacks from loose Teams and such were "The Ultimate Disaster" was being attacked by starving ferral Dogs, who have no fear of people whatso ever and as a pack are nearly undefeatable.

    Prehaps a Dog in the Wolf blood would make them less afraid of people and more likely to be a danger to people........my thoughts go to the unconfirmed (as far as I know) Wolf kill of a teacher in southern AK awhile back.

    Thoughts?
    Do you live in buckland? My brother just took a mission trip up there a few months ago.

  15. #15
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    I saw a story on TV last week about a women who was killed and ate some by three coyotes while people were yelling and throwing stuff at them,no rabies found after the yotes were killed
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,636

    Default

    FFG, I dont live in BKL, I live in Noorvik, but Ive been in Kotzebue for a few days, making some $$ , watching our oldest daughter at the regional Baskeball playoffs, fishing (more like standing there~~LOL~~) repairing my ride and the wife has been selling artwork........been a long 5 days, but weve gotten to visit plenty with people from all over being in Kotzebue, and us working outside

    I used to live 29 miles from BKL, and I buy gas and such often there as well, because its close to where I roam, I know most everyone,........who is yer bro? has he left?

    There being plenty of sled dogs yet, I could see how such might have a higher % that get out and about, but most villages shoot loose dogs, and Ive never seen a German Shepperd pull a sled, yet'.
    Oldtimers 'round here , in a time of need or oportunity, would take Wolf pups and add or make a team out of them, even cross breeding from female Wolves into the teams. From the inlaws description, they would crush the males nuts as pups when doing so, as well, they had to modify the harmless someway to accommodate a Wolves chest......
    Untill dog racing brought Hounddog mixing into the region, alotta Huskys looked pretty Wolfish.....

    Funny, Buckland is "Malamuit" Inupiaq country, where Malamuit Huskys were originally bred.
    Being in a very rich environment, The Buckland/Kiwalik area people, like the rest of the Kotzebue area Tribes,had alotta more dogs on the gang line than most, often 10 or more, and had surplus dogs that they raced, worked and barterd and made the breed famous.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  17. #17
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post

    The only known deaths from Wolves in local history, comes from Rabid wolves, who infact bit and killed my father-in-laws, Father-in-law, Punnekok Sampson of Noorvik, back in the 30's.....and theres PLENTY of Wolves to be found up this way.....

    Thoughts?
    stranger I believe that story is told in "Alaskas Wolf Man: Frank Glaser" by Jim Reardon....am I wrong?



    Release Lake Trout

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,636

    Default

    I donno, I havent read that book, but when I git it in my hands, I hear its a good read,Huntnfish......... I heard it from my Father in Law, as the victim was his fatherinlaw when it happened. He was married to Punnekok's daughter Tingook "Nita" Sampson, before she passed away after child birth.

    The Wolf first attacked his dogs, then he went out of his house into the night and was attacked from behind, the wolf jumping up and getting ahold of him by the neck.untill he fought it off..., and then Noorvik hitched up and raced that Wolf down......... they ran the Wolf down up by Kiana, and found it rabid. Punnekok died in Kotzebue Hospital from the rabies

    My Father in law was quite old, and quite the talker when he thought I was a listening ~~LOL!!~~
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  19. #19
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    thats exactly how the story was told.....Frank Glaser was sent to investigate it and was hoping to talk to the victim, but it was too late....if youd like, ill gladly send you the book.....it is a wonderful read and very informative about life in 20s and 30s alaska....



    Release Lake Trout

  20. #20
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    Frank Glaser was in the Kotz area training the locals how to lure in and kill wolves, and to help manage the first reindeer herds in the area.....like i said before, the book is an incredible insight.



    Release Lake Trout

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •