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Thread: Fill me in on chitina/glenallen dipnetting

  1. #1

    Default Fill me in on chitina/glenallen dipnetting

    Okay, so we will be residents finally this year and we plan on dipnetting the chitina or glenallen areas. I looked at the F&G regs and as I understand, these two areas are basically divided by a bridge? Is this correct? If so, the limit in the Glenallen area is twice that of the Chitina, so why wouldn't I choose the glenallen area or at least go just past the bridge to double my limit? I mean, 60 salmon looks better than 30 since I will eat one every two or three days!

    I have never been there, so I don't know anything about the area except that it is dangerous. We have no kids, so it is just 2 adults going, but I am wondering where to go and what the reasons might be for choosing one area over another. I looked at the stupid little map they provide, but it is not very informative. All it shows me is that there is no access to the river, which I know is not the case. So anyway, opinions and info would be appreciated on WHERE to go (Glenallen area or Chitina), WHERE to get access, and any other precautions or tips would help.

    FYI, we would like to camp for a couple days and we have ATV's if they are allowed. Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
    Member Jackson's Dad's Avatar
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    I am sure that someone will correct me if I am wrong, but the Chitina subdistrict area is a personal use fishery (dipnets only), which any Alaska resident qualifies for. I think that the Glenallen subdistrict is a subsistence fishery (dipnets or fishwheel), and you have to qualify for a subsistence permit. I believe that you qualify based on where you live, as in if you are rural, you qualify, and if you live in FBX or ANCH you do not. It gets messy, and I do not pretend to understand as I have not researched it that much. I would highly suggest talking to someone at your local ADFG office to get the word from the horses mouth, so to speak.

    Here is the link to the ADFG website regarding Chitina, might be good to do some poking around.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...orChitina.main

    As for access, I am sure that others will chime in, and if you do a search you will probably find what you are looking for. I have not been there yet, but I will some day! Hope this helps.

    Cheers,
    Jay
    “The mountains are calling and I must go.” - John Muir

    "Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

  3. #3

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    I just saw that - thanks. I must have missed the subsistence part when I was reading it.

    Okay, so now the question is WHERE to go on the Chitina part to get access. Thanks.

  4. #4
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Your best bet is to just go down to Chitna and take Hem's charter and do the drop off. They will put you in a good stop, it does take some technique and you will figure it quicker this way. The ATV trail can be hazardous and climbing back up with a load of fish is a PITA. Camp along the road and put your cooler and net in line to hold your place. Take extra nets as lots of junk comes down the river and it is not unusual to loose nets. Wear PFDs and tie yourself off, take enough rope to tie your fish off in numbers of 5, makes it easier to carry and keep count of. Cut the tails as soon as you land them and bleed them out. Hem's has a hotline to call and can be counted on, check with F&G for emergency orders as the regs change. I did a search for Hem's and this website came up and says they have partnered with Hem.
    Be safe and good fishing.

    http://www.copperrivercharters.net/index2.htm










    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  5. #5

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    Thanks! That is exactly what i was looking for as far as information. I doubt we will charter a boat bc of the $$$, but we will want to fish somewhere we can get to on foot or ATV.

    What do you mean about cutting the tails?

  6. #6

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    Check out the sites in my signature for additional info. Also, there's a ton of info on this forum for tips and techniques, so the effort you expend here will prepare you for the effort you are about to expend at the Copper.

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    Member Derby06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Explorer View Post
    What do you mean about cutting the tails?
    A person may not possess salmon taken under a personal use salmon fishing permit unless both tips of the tail fin have been immediately removed from the salmon. Immediately means before concealing the salmon from plain view or transporting the salmon from the fishing site.


    Be very careful. I would suggest if at all possible go with someone that has experience dipnetting there. Like you said, Chitna can be VERY dangerous, especially for a first timer. And the rules are unique, hence the question above. You miss a detail and Johnny Lawman just might get ya.

    ATV's are allowed and common in Chitna.
    Camping is also allowed and quite common.

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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    Steve you're killin me!


    Hey AkExplorer, if you want some serious sockeye dipping action for your buck, look no further than the Kenai/Kasilof areas. Theres much more recreational opportunities on the peninsula than around the Chitna area. Plus theres not cops and tribal enforcement behind every tree. Oh and did I mention the dipnetter is king in the upper cook inlet?

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    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    FB, I"m glad we finally agree on one thing!!! Your last line above, LOL
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

  10. #10

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    Derby - Thanks for the info. I heard something about that, but I hadn't read it yet in the regs. I will definitely be scouring this site as the trip gets closer.

    FullBush - I already have a trip planned for the Kenai, but I want to do the Chitina as well. I didn't move up here to be a softy and NOT do stuff because of the rough, wild terrain. That is exactly what makes it great! I am always cautious, so I am sure I will be fine and have a good time in both places.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Since we are asking questions here....

    I have not been up there but am kicking around going if I can run the boat. My boat is a 17'6" Wooldridge AK with the narrower hull. Power is a Merc 90(65) jet. I am unsure if I have enough power and I am also curious what type of anchor gear would be needed to be able to hold the boat in that water, preferably something that can be recovered as well as deployed <grin> I currently have a Dansforth that works pretty good in silt or gravel, though I expect it would be next to useless in a rock bottom.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Since we are asking questions here....

    I have not been up there but am kicking around going if I can run the boat. My boat is a 17'6" Wooldridge AK with the narrower hull. Power is a Merc 90(65) jet. I am unsure if I have enough power and I am also curious what type of anchor gear would be needed to be able to hold the boat in that water, preferably something that can be recovered as well as deployed <grin> I currently have a Dansforth that works pretty good in silt or gravel, though I expect it would be next to useless in a rock bottom.
    I've taken a 17' lowe with a 88 jet on the copper for years,gone almost all the way to the million dollar bridge. I have an anchor but never use it down there, The best way to dip is out of the boat drifting sideways,with the net's on the upstream side . Find a good drift thats not to deep so you can bump the bottom with your net and is full of fish and just keep working the same area until it's played out. There's some good spots just above the canyon and just below it.

    I always did most of my drifts in early morning or all night ,if it's hot out the river will come up many feet during the day,that makes it harder to dip net.

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    I make an annual trek to Chitina for some of the best eating fish there is. I don't take my kids and my wife has no desire to go anymore. For us it is a meat run and I can think of a million other places to co camping. The wind blows a lot and when it does it blows silt. The river can and should be intimidating if you are in a boat. Take ropes and equipment to tie of if you are going to fish from the rocks in the canyon (which is accessible on one side by 4 wheelers) I have not accessed the river that way but see lots of people doing it. You can take the old road / trail down as far as Haley creek for dipping. From what I understand the trail is not for the faint of heart and still requires steep climbing to get to the river. There is some areas of private land and I can't tell you how that all works - I think you may be able to get a trespass permit so you don't have to worry about it. I know I see a lot of folks hanging off of spots I wouldn't fish from even if I could get there.

    This is why you want to go!

    Best spot on the river (Don't tell anyone)

    From Haley creek looking back towards the canyon

    Looking at Haley creek from the river - The "Trail" runs along the hillside to the right of the creek

  14. #14

    Default other tips

    Bring lots of water, something to do when it's slow, and don't wear your good jeans.


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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Explorer View Post
    FullBush - I already have a trip planned for the Kenai, but I want to do the Chitina as well. I didn't move up here to be a softy and NOT do stuff because of the rough, wild terrain. That is exactly what makes it great! I am always cautious, so I am sure I will be fine and have a good time in both places.
    Enjoy what Alaska has to offer, do it your way... the Copper don't play around, and there may even be a fish or 2 to dip, that is if I let them through, when I do let them through they were meant for the spawning beds. I'm known as the Kokenhenik Gatekeeper....Good luck

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    Member MaximumPenetration's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    Steve you're killin me!


    Hey AkExplorer, if you want some serious sockeye dipping action for your buck, look no further than the Kenai/Kasilof areas. Theres much more recreational opportunities on the peninsula than around the Chitna area. Plus theres not cops and tribal enforcement behind every tree. Oh and did I mention the dipnetter is king in the upper cook inlet?
    It's good you finally recognize this FB. I like seeing you come around buddy.

  17. #17
    Member Albradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaximumPenetration View Post
    It's good you finally recognize this FB. I like seeing you come around buddy.
    I dont know if you have looked yet but search up Chitina needs list has everything and it was started by yours truly...Fullbush even added a bunch of good advice on there.Oh and what I learned best....BRING BEER even if you dont drink it its like liquid gold you can trade it for anything down there.
    There's a fine line between fishing....

    and standing on the shore like an idiot! ALLEN BRADLEY-TANGLE LAKES ADVOCATE/FANBOY

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    I'd like to add if you are on foot pick a hole with some blood and scales on the ground and wait for fish. If you keep moving from hole to hole (each with a steep incline and hazards) you may find yourself with no strength left when the big push comes, plus you've still got the walk back. Sometimes the fish will stack up out of bounds for a whole day and it's tempting to try a spot and move on, but if you leave yourself enough time to wait through the dead times they are bound to come. Also, if you are walking in neoprene waders you will sweat twice as much and need twice as much water.

  19. #19
    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    If you want to go to the windiest part of Alaska and flog a muddy river for the chance at a salmon then this is the place for you. 300 miles from anywhere 4 dollar gas, the only wildlife in Chitna is parky squirrels and long haired acid freaks that stayed there after the last Chitna Bluegrass festival in 1974. Thats right the biggest Blue Grass festival in Alaska wasn't in Talkeetna it was in Chitna for years. Thats where the "Where the hell is Chitna" bumper sticker originated from. The most interesting thing about the whole area is the memorial in McCarthy where one of the left over blue grass hippies decided to shoot and kill the whole town one day. If you really want to fill your freezer w/ fish for the winter I would hit the Kenai for a week and do the dipnet thing on the lower river then go spank some of those russian river reds. Swing by Seward on your way home and pop out and get your 6 silvers. My God man thats some eating! Heck you could even get some razors if the tides right down in Clam gulch. So the choice is yours--300 miles for a possible red salmon and a limit of parky squirrels for 250 bucks worth of gas or a full freezer from the glistening waters of Cooks Inlet....



    <edit>
    Last edited by fullbush; 03-20-2011 at 15:58. Reason: wanted to brighten peoples day w/ a smile

  20. #20
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    If you want to go to the windiest part of Alaska and flog a muddy river for the chance at a salmon then this is the place for you. 300 miles from anywhere 4 dollar gas, the only wildlife in Chitna is parky squirrels and long haired acid freaks that stayed there after the last Chitna Bluegrass festival in 1974. Thats right the biggest Blue Grass festival in Alaska wasn't in Talkeetna it was in Chitna for years. Thats where the "Where the hell is Chitna" bumper sticker originated from. The most interesting thing about the whole area is the memorial in McCarthy where one of the left over blue grass hippies decided to shoot and kill the whole town one day. If you really want to fill your freezer w/ fish for the winter I would hit the Kenai for a week and do the dipnet thing on the lower river then go spank some of those russian river reds. Swing by Seward on your way home and pop out and get your 6 silvers. My God man thats some eating! Heck you could even get some razors if the tides right down in Clam gulch. So the choice is yours--300 miles for a possible red salmon and a limit of parky squirrels for 250 bucks worth of gas or a full freezer from the glistening waters of Cooks Inlet....



    <edit>
    Come on fullbush, all my friends and relatives down south are preppy and have to have the copper river reds to server at fancy office parties so they can brag to their friends.

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