Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Situk

  1. #1
    grizzeyes
    Guest

    Default Situk

    Was thinking of taking my first trip to Yakutat this spring for a trophy Steelhead. I don't mind traveling alone but might save much more money if sharing a hotel room if any guys are planning a trip. Any word from the fly shops if a group is going?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    Grizz,been there several times over the last 20 years.People think you can just get off a plane and then go fishing and it's not so.To fully enjoy the experince of fishing the Situk you really should pay the extra and have a guide float you down the river.The reason I tell you this is that it is about 10 mile drive to reach the Situk from town.Once you drive there(which means renting a truck)or get dropped off,you can only fish the river at that point and as far as you want to hike,which is what EVERYONE has to do when on foot.There is some "OK" fishing at this spot but nothing like drifting the river.The time of year is also important because if you go too early all you will catch are "winter" steelhead which are the ones that stay in the river all winter.We always drifted it from May 8th and took 3 days to come out.You can do it in one day but you have to fish fast and end up skipping past some nice holes.Also by going the first week of May you wil get into the winter fish in the upper river and then start getting into the bright spring fish towards the middle to the end of the float.Good luck!!

  3. #3
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    I'm going by myself in May on my way back to anchorage via whittier
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    The Situk is a great river but it can puzzle a new guy. If the water levels are high the fishing is better but it's harder to fish from the banks, and the spots available to walkers are fewer and more crowded. If the water's low, new fish are reluctant to enter the river and those that are already there are above the low-end walking areas. You can walk the upper river but that's what everybody else will be doing, too. If the water gets low enough, drift boats are hard to get down and even some guys that would normally boat will walk.

    On a normal trip you'll see average water levels that vary a little from day to day. Another part of the riddle is that one day the fish will sit in the tail-outs, while the next day may see some rain and rising water and the fish are at the heads of the drifts. Sometimes the fish are gorouped up, sometimes they're scattered. Sometimes they stay deep, sometimes they lay in the shallows. All these variables change every day. You have to be flexible.

    Don't believe for a second that you'll be on a remote stream. The Situk gets lots of pressure and you'll see lots of other fisherman regardless of whether you walk or drift. The river is very driftable in a day, especially in the longer days of May. I've drifted that river more than 75 times with a buddy and prefer that way of fishing IF the water levels are normal or higher. Unfortunately a new guy won't know the holes until you get past them so a guide for a day or two, or three, is a really good idea. If you expect to drift it self-guided, you need to know how to handle a drift boat in an often narrow stream with cut log gates to maneuver through and you need to be able to get past other boats and fisherman without ruining their day. It isn't just a lazy drift. The lower 4 miles or so are very flat and require rowing. If the wind's blowing upstream it can really beat you up. More so if the wind has the bottom stretches (which are exposed) blown into 2-3 foot waves. You need to be aware of the incoming tides at the take-out, too. In coming tides are usually accompanied by onshore winds.

    Take a variety of gear and be prepared for rapidly changing conditions. We had 12 inches of rain in 5 days one year. The river nearly flooded out and the fishing got better every day, but flogging the water with a fly rod became useless. We always take baitcasters for high water conditions. Expect to lose a lot of gear if the water gets high, too. The fish lay up in the bushes along the banks. If you don't cast in to them, you won't catch them. You can leave a good deal of gear in those trees, I promise.

    As for outfitting, the outfitters can drop you and a boat at the river and pick you up that night, but it counts as a guide day and they only get so many of those allotted. You can rent a vehicle to get yourself around but if you intend to drift you may need two vehicles and you have to jockey your trailer and trucks back and forth every morning and night, which is a huge pain in the rear. There's the best reason to hire a guide if you want to drift.

    PM me if you want specific info or advice. It's a great river, and worth the effort.
    Last edited by Mr. Pid; 03-06-2007 at 08:16.

  5. #5
    Member jrt34's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    81

    Default Great Post Mr. Pid

    Last spring by best buddy took me down to the Situk as a pre-wedding gift. We went the last weekend in April and we were the "puzzled new guys" you refered to in your post. I wish I would have know about this forum a year ago!

    You speak the truth about fly-rodding in high muddy waters, learning about the holes after you drift over them, donating a bunch of gear to the bushes and dealing with rapidly changing weather and other anglers.

    We found that two first-timers can rent a drift boat, catch fish, and have a hell of a time. Nevertheless, I would reccomend that anyone going for the first time either go with someone who's familer with the river or hire a guide.

  6. #6
    Member AKducks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    485

    Default

    My first trip to the situk I had no idea what to do We just walked the upper part saw lots of fish and caught a few ( 5 over two days for me) it was the best fishing trip I had been on. two years later I wen't with some friends and a college prof. (AK powder is going with him this spring) had another great trip took a drift boat for a two day float down the river that was a blast never used a drift boat before ( that is a whole story in its self) had another great trip. caught lots of fish . but the best part of the situk(for someone who dosen't fish steelies) is just seeing all of them YOU WILL SEE FISH it is very cool. and I can't wait to go agin

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    soldotna
    Posts
    527

    Default situk

    rent a suburban, sleep in it, fish all day, drink all night... that's what i did and i'd do it again in a heartbeat. make sure you stop in at leonard's landing at least once for dinner (some of the best food i've ever had). and spend the money to go on a saltwater trip - it's unreal! oh yea, and don't tell anyone else about the place, or maybe it's too late for that.
    Mark

  8. #8
    Member AKducks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    485

    Default

    yeah I would have to say pretty much all the eating places are pretty good leonard's landing being the best, but make sure to check when they're open the restraunts aren't open 7 days a week.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    They have restaurants in Yakutat? Imagine that. I've been going there every year for 20+ years and eating in a restaurant never occurred to me. Leave in the dark, return in the dark. I go there to fish.

    On a sad note, Jill Fanning from Yakutat Lodge passed away in early December. I'll miss her very much. She was one of my all-time favorite people.

  10. #10
    Member Wyatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    PAQ
    Posts
    360

    Default

    One more on my never ending list of places to fish! I hear Leonard was also quite a character! I recently met one of the guys who's part of the group who bought Leonard's Landing. Biased perhaps, but he says the fishing off the beach is also great and a boat isn't even needed! Can anyone confirm? Also, anyone know the names of guides running the Situk and general rates? How about Monti Bay Lodge compared to the rest?

    Wyatt

  11. #11
    Member AKducks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    485

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    They have restaurants in Yakutat? Imagine that. I've been going there every year for 20+ years and eating in a restaurant never occurred to me. Leave in the dark, return in the dark. I go there to fish.

    On a sad note, Jill Fanning from Yakutat Lodge passed away in early December. I'll miss her very much. She was one of my all-time favorite people.
    when I went we would go for lunch mostly cause thats when the fishing stank.

  12. #12
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    oh boy oh boy oh boy I can't wait till may!
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •