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Thread: Best backpacking tent...

  1. #1
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Default Best backpacking tent...

    I know this one has been beat to death and search yielded an overwhelming amount of information but....

    I'm buying a new tent in the next few weeks as part of my sheep hunting prep and I'm looking for input- 3/4 season, weight under 6lbs., 2/3 person.

    I've looked at the tipis as well as some serious 3 and 4 season mountaineering tents- both have their pros and cons.

    Cost is a factor but not the biggest factor- I'm willing to pay for quality.

    What are the rest of you using?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    ... 3/4 season, weight under 6lbs., 2/3 person.
    This puts you in to either a single wall, a tunnel tent or one where the inner tent is mostly bug screen.

    It all comes down to what you are willing to trade/sacrifice. Personally, I will carry an extra 1.5lbs for an expedition quality 2 man tent and I prefer free standing. Other guys have different priorities/wants. I've never been humping it up a mountain wishing I had a tent that was 1.5lbs lighter. But, I have sure been thankfull I had my bomber freestanding tent a few times. My 2 man tent is a Hilleberg Tarra and I love crawling in to that thing. It's a bunker. It weighs just over 8lbs and to me, it's worth it's weight in gold.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Lots of things to factor in. Plenty of great quality teepee tents, I have several different golite all new in the box. I will probably be selling some off here in the next couple months. I plan to keep my golite SL 3, 5 and 8. I will also keep my Hilleberg Nallo 4. I will be selling a SL2 and a BA seedhouse (not the UL). I have not used the SL tents yet (I just kept getting fantastic deals on them) but plan to spend a good bit of time in them this summer. I have been lucky to have a few different tents to use, if I only had one for all uses it would probably be the Nallo.

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    For the last 6 years, I've been using a Black Diamond MegaMid Light ... 2.5#. It has to be staked out, but has withstood high winds and heavy rains, and still is in great shape. I also have a 6 man MountainHardwear dome, a MH 3 man dome ... both are mountaineering rigs ... but I prefer my MegaMid Light, even north of the Brooks Range. But that's just my preference.

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    Member tyrex13's Avatar
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    I have no experience with this tent, but this looks interesting.

    http://www.rei.com/product/794283

    You could also check out the MSR Hubba Hubba.

  6. #6

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    You should go down to Beaver Sports and see what kind of deal you could make on a Bibler that is non-current. They are a lot of tent that is light. You then could buy aftermarket carbon fiber tent poles and you would be cooking with gas.

    You could do this as well.

    http://www.theoutfitteratharpersferr...ERG/Categories

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaboku68 View Post
    You should go down to Beaver Sports and see what kind of deal you could make on a Bibler that is non-current. They are a lot of tent that is light. You then could buy aftermarket carbon fiber tent poles and you would be cooking with gas.

    You could do this as well.

    http://www.theoutfitteratharpersferr...ERG/Categories

    Sincerely,
    Thomas
    I've had two Biblers...fabulous mountain and snow country tents. They were single layer/four season and lightweight, but would condense heavily with two bodies in cool weather.
    The last Mountain Hardwear I had was also a four season/single layer and weighed four pounds. Fabulous bombshelter but terrible with condensation. I've gone back to the two layer rainfly design to avoid the moisture.
    I may try a mega mid or other teepee this year. Might as well utilize my trekking poles for the tent support.
    Proud to be an American!

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullkurl View Post
    I've had two Biblers...fabulous mountain and snow country tents. They were single layer/four season and lightweight, but would condense heavily with two bodies in cool weather.
    The last Mountain Hardwear I had was also a four season/single layer and weighed four pounds. Fabulous bombshelter but terrible with condensation. I've gone back to the two layer rainfly design to avoid the moisture.
    I may try a mega mid or other teepee this year. Might as well utilize my trekking poles for the tent support.
    Once you get over the floorless design its actually pretty nice for most of my backpack hunting applications. When you are talking 90 sq ft of space for only 2 lbs vs. tents that way 3 to 4 times more its pretty sweet. Nice to crawl into the tent with boots and rain gear on and and plenty of space for everyone to swap gear out and cook dinner while not having to either undress outside or in a cramped vestibule prior to entering the tent. Most of the tipis have a bunch of tie out points that make them pretty hell for stout even in pretty good winds. With all the guyouts in place its anchored down with 19 stakes and in the 30 mph winds that I have had mine in its been mroe than rock solid here is a review and a video of a gear using it in the winter in 60 MPH winds.

    http://www.backpacker.com/cgi-bin/fo...9;t=9991146740

    For the price ($210 right now) its pretty hard to beat especially compared to the Hillebergs. Heck I had a Hilleberg Nallo GT3 and sold it after this fall due to being more impressed with the tipi than the Nallo for my uses.

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    Once you get over the floorless design its actually pretty nice for most of my backpack hunting applications. When you are talking 90 sq ft of space for only 2 lbs vs. tents that way 3 to 4 times more its pretty sweet. Nice to crawl into the tent with boots and rain gear on and and plenty of space for everyone to swap gear out and cook dinner while not having to either undress outside or in a cramped vestibule prior to entering the tent. Most of the tipis have a bunch of tie out points that make them pretty hell for stout even in pretty good winds. With all the guyouts in place its anchored down with 19 stakes and in the 30 mph winds that I have had mine in its been mroe than rock solid here is a review and a video of a gear using it in the winter in 60 MPH winds.

    http://www.backpacker.com/cgi-bin/fo...9;t=9991146740

    For the price ($210 right now) its pretty hard to beat especially compared to the Hillebergs. Heck I had a Hilleberg Nallo GT3 and sold it after this fall due to being more impressed with the tipi than the Nallo for my uses.
    My only concern with the teepee is the moisture on the ground around my bag...how do you deal with it?
    How do you keep anything dry when its pouring and rain finds its way into the floor area? Your link refered to the bathtub accessory..is it required to avoid the moisture?
    From a weight standpoint teepees rock...
    Proud to be an American!

  10. #10

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    I find that the ground never gets wet when settting up on dry tundra no matter how hard it rains so far. Granted if setting up in a muskeg it will be wet the entire time and a tipi isn't the best application. That said, wet tundra dries quickly (less than a day) even when the tipi is set up in the rain. Just be sure to leave an inch or so of space between the ground and the bottom edge of the tipi during this ground drying process to prevent too much condensation. After the ground is dry you get a film of condensation in the morning but nothing dripping with 2 guys in there all night.

    When I hunting with my wife we use this bug net that is 14 oz hung from the center pole that has a bathtub floor to keep your bag dry when you setup on wet ground before it dries out. Plus keeps all the bugs out. Granted it would be a little to cozy 2 people if it wasn't my wife and I though.

    When going with another guy I just put my bag inside a TI Goat bivy with my sleeping pad inside of it too. The bottom of this bivy is waterproof and the top breathes to allow moisture escape. Works well for sure. This bivies are 6 oz and I actually will be selling one as my wife doesn't need one cause if she is coming along we will be taking the bug net anyways so we only need one.

    Hope that helps.

    This pic has been posted way too much on here, but whats once mroe huh to give you an idea of what the bug bivy setup looks like. Obviously the bivy setup can be arranged in any manner and there is enough space for 3 guys inside fore sure especailly if you stash your gear on the lower edges of the tipi where the space isn't useable for much else anyways.





    Yeah for space to weight tipis are hard to beat for sure and you eventually may come to prefer the floorless design for your tent for everywhere but where your bag is. The SL5, with the bug net, and all 19 stakes is still sub 3.25 pounds for a 90 sq ft of sheltered area with 30 sq ft of which has a true bathtub floor and out of the bugs completely.

  11. #11
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I had a bad experience with single wall tents and has skeptical about them when my friend brought his Bibler I tent on our Brooks Range sheep hunt last fall. I have to say that it preformed extremely well with very little condensation and we had biblical rains. It sets up really fast and is very tough. I liked it so much that I bought one for my trip to Kodiak for a goat hunt. I upgraded the poles to carbon fiber and the tent, ready to go weighs 4lbs 11ozs. I found the ToddTex single-wall fabric to be very tough.

    http://www.e-omc.com/catalog/product...ler-ITent.html





    On Kodiak and also Alaska_lance's teepee.



    Carbon fiber poles and the original aluminum poles.

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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by tyrex13 View Post
    I have no experience with this tent, but this looks interesting.

    http://www.rei.com/product/794283

    We just got the REI one last year. It's great!

  13. #13
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    I know this one has been beat to death and search yielded an overwhelming amount of information but....

    I'm buying a new tent in the next few weeks as part of my sheep hunting prep and I'm looking for input- 3/4 season, weight under 6lbs., 2/3 person.

    I've looked at the tipis as well as some serious 3 and 4 season mountaineering tents- both have their pros and cons.

    Cost is a factor but not the biggest factor- I'm willing to pay for quality.

    What are the rest of you using?

    I use a Black Diamond "Guiding Light". Meets your weight requirement and is a 4 person tent. Lots of room, rock solid design, and very well built. Search online for deals, usually a $500-600 tent. Packs down to the size of a 2L soda bottle. Spent lots of time in mine in pouring rains, 30+ mph winds, etc.. Single wall tent and it is drum tight. Rain drops bounce off. Just a great tent.


    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member tyrex13's Avatar
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    I forgot to mention to check out the Go Lite website, there is a 40% coupon that is good through the end of the month.

    Lanche, I'm gonna get the Shangri-La 3, how do you like yours? You should do a review

  15. #15
    Member polardds's Avatar
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    Default Hilleberg

    IMG_0764.jpgThey make several tunnel tents that would fit your needs. Look at a Nallo 3 Or Nallo 3 GT. Four season and light. Very durable. Lots of people here on the forum use them. Spendy, but you get what you pay for.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by polardds View Post
    IMG_0764.jpgThey make several tunnel tents that would fit your needs. Look at a Nallo 3 Or Nallo 3 GT. Four season and light. Very durable. Lots of people here on the forum use them. Spendy, but you get what you pay for.
    Hey looks like we were camped right by eachother J/K


    They are great tents no disputing that, just not for my needs

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by polardds View Post
    IMG_0764.jpgThey make several tunnel tents that would fit your needs. Look at a Nallo 3 Or Nallo 3 GT. Four season and light. Very durable. Lots of people here on the forum use them. Spendy, but you get what you pay for.
    I keep forgetting that they make a non-GT model, I have the GT and if you go Nallo get the GT model. Mine Nallo GT 4 slept 6 in an emergency on Kodiak. I loaned it to my BIL and FIL for their trip with 4 of their friends. Wind driven rain demolished the other tent and they all huddled up in the GT 4 till they could make it out to a cabin the next day.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Lots of things to factor in. Plenty of great quality teepee tents, I have several different golite all new in the box. I will probably be selling some off here in the next couple months. I plan to keep my golite SL 3, 5 and 8. I will also keep my Hilleberg Nallo 4. I will be selling a SL2 and a BA seedhouse (not the UL). I have not used the SL tents yet (I just kept getting fantastic deals on them) but plan to spend a good bit of time in them this summer. I have been lucky to have a few different tents to use, if I only had one for all uses it would probably be the Nallo.
    I'd be intrested in your SL2!

  19. #19
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Anybody ever try a bivy instead of a tent? Seems like a way to chop weight... and a lot of comfort for 10 days in the field.

    Some great options being suggested so far.

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    I'd venture to say that, if you plan to camp on ground that drains okay, even if that ground is soaked upon initial setup, you'll be dryer overall in wet weather in a SL4 or SL5 than anything with a floor. This assuming you manage drainage and don't set up in muskeg.

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