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Thread: Bison permit ... failed again.

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    Thumbs down Bison permit ... failed again.

    I put in for a Delta Bison permit for the first time when I was 39 years old. And each year since. For 29 years, I've hoped to have a chance to hunt WILD Bison in Alaska. The system doesn't work for many of us. I still hope to get a chance while I'm still vigorous and can enjoy the hunt, and still have enough teeth to enjoy the great meat.

    The drawing system should be, IMHO, one permit in a lifetime ... for Alaskans only. The current system is a corrupt fund raiser for ADFG, run in the interest of ADFG and guides.

    I sure would like to have my honest chance. 29 years is a long wait. And I have no interest in farmed Bison, no matter how large the pasture.

  2. #2

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    Has anybody won it more than once?

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    I've only put in for it twice and failed both times, you are not making me feel any better.

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    You could save up your permit fees every year and put it towards a kodiak bison (not free range but they aren't fenced from what I understand) or alberta bison. I think there's a sizable herd in British Columbia too, but heard there's a lot of competition for those. There's also a free range herd in South Dakota on one of the indian reservations that I don't think is a draw hunt as long as you hire a guide. Unfortunately at the .6 % the odds are you can apply your whole life and not get one. I'm young and plan on applying for the next 15 to 20 years but if I don't get one by then, then I'm just going to give up and either hunt a farm bison or one in Canada.

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    Is it purely for the meat that you guys want to hunt them? Or is the sport? I just don't have a desire to shoot one, but that's just me.

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    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    I would like to hunt one because I feel that I would be living my grandfathers dream. Up until he turned 80 he drove out to Quigley Montana to shoot the BPCR (black powder cartridge rife) national championships. He has alwasy been facinated with the history of the old west and Native American history which has everything to do with a buffalo. He was never interested in a canned bison hunt, and often wished out loud that there were more free range bison opportunities. Basically, my gradfather was born about 100 years too late. If I ever draw one, I will use on of his old Sharpes rifles and butcher it with one of his handmade knives.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    One way to increase your chances of being able to hunt bison is to also apply for either the Farewell or Copper River herds. I hunted the Farewell bison in 2002 and it was an awesome experience. It's not much better odds, but three applications are better than two.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    One way to increase your chances of being able to hunt bison is to also apply for either the Farewell or Copper River herds. I hunted the Farewell bison in 2002 and it was an awesome experience. It's not much better odds, but three applications are better than two.
    Don't forget to explain the Cost differences and logistics there Brian. Or, your just gonna flood the system with applicants that do not have the "means" or the "funds" to hunt the tougher access Bison tags..

    Just sayin.......

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    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Has anybody won it more than once?
    My wifes boss has drawn it twice and was successful both times. If I drew it once and connected I would have completed my dream and would not put in again I would be happy with just one chance. Maybe next year but if not next year I will keep on trying I dont plan to give up till I get it some day.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I don't see where the delta area bison are even one little bit more wild than the ones on Kodiak.

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    Member Jeff Shannon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I put in for a Delta Bison permit for the first time when I was 39 years old. And each year since. For 29 years, I've hoped to have a chance to hunt WILD Bison in Alaska. The system doesn't work for many of us. I still hope to get a chance while I'm still vigorous and can enjoy the hunt, and still have enough teeth to enjoy the great meat.

    The drawing system should be, IMHO, one permit in a lifetime ... for Alaskans only. The current system is a corrupt fund raiser for ADFG, run in the interest of ADFG and guides.

    I sure would like to have my honest chance. 29 years is a long wait. And I have no interest in farmed Bison, no matter how large the pasture.
    29 years is a long wait, but statistically you'll have to wait about another 170 years just to break even with the odds. You really can't complain about the odds not being in your favor until the draw results get posted in 2181 and you still haven't drawn. The reality is most of us will never draw a Delta bison tag, and that's just the way it is with highly coveted tags. If you really want to shoot a bison just go down to Montana and hunt the Crow Reservation. For a couple thousand bucks they'll let you shoot a bull from their herd. They're technically not free range because the tribe owns them, but they range over a couple hundred thousand acres of the Bighorn Mountains. Don't worry, there's nothing "corrupt" about the tribal system.

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    Most likely, the Alberta hunt is the most attractive alternative. Last time I checked, the price was $4000, which is reasonable.
    My other option is a friend who lives in a village in the NWT that is close to the Wood Buffalo Nat. Park. I can hunt with him, but the meat stays in the village; I get the hide and skull.

    I've put in numerous times for Farewell. I know the area, and would choose a Winter - early March hunt. No luck there and my Skandik SWT is now 13 years old, and, frankly, I don't trust old sno-goes.

    I'll have to think about the Copper River hunt. My new Scott Hudson Bay may be a good boat for that hunt.

    My maternal grandfather was a surveyor on the Southern Pacific RR in the 1880's. (He was dead long before I arrived.) My grandmother had the buffalo robe from the bull he shot from the last of the great southern herd. From an early age, I've wanted to hunt buffalo. My time for doing it is rapidly passing. But, enough whining.

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    Rick,
    I was very fortunate to get a tag this year, only my second year of puting in for it. If succesful, I wont apply again in hopes that others may have the same opportunity that was awarded me. Good luck in next years draw, now I need to start my homework on this hunt. If anyone has any info it would greatly be appreciated. I would like to use my bow but have heard that the animals get very wery as the hunt goes on and are nearly imposible to stalk.

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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Don't feel bad. I've been putting in for it off and on since 1989 and still haven't connected.
    Now what ?

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I don't see where the delta area bison are even one little bit more wild than the ones on Kodiak.
    Absolutely. They are both free ranging without fences. They are both transplanted. In actuality I'd venture to bet the delta bison see a lot more people every year than the Kodiak ones. Probably tougher country/hunt in Kodiak too.

    Brett

  16. #16

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    Kodiak Bison:

    Do you need a Hunting License? NO
    Do you need a Harvest Ticket? NO
    Does the "Wanton waste" law apply? NO
    Does the Farmer tell you where they are? YES
    Does the Farmer charge you to shoot one of his "Stock"? Yes
    Can you shoot one first, and then pay the Farmer? NO

    Farm Animals...In pretty much every way.

    I saw an Angus Bull in the Mountains of Montana... No fences, he was 20 miles from the nearest road. Would you consider that a Farm animal or a Wild Angus? I thought "FARM"... (grin)

  17. #17
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperCub View Post
    Kodiak Bison:

    Do you need a Hunting License? NO
    Do you need a Harvest Ticket? NO
    Does the "Wanton waste" law apply? NO
    Does the Farmer tell you where they are? YES
    Does the Farmer charge you to shoot one of his "Stock"? Yes
    Can you shoot one first, and then pay the Farmer? NO

    Farm Animals...In pretty much every way.

    I saw an Angus Bull in the Mountains of Montana... No fences, he was 20 miles from the nearest road. Would you consider that a Farm animal or a Wild Angus? I thought "FARM"... (grin)
    Explain to me what the difference is between that and going to Delta, hunting a farmers field, asking him where he's seen them, and shooting them in his field? Because that's exactly what I've heard some lucky enough to draw a Delta tag describe to me! I'm not in any way knocking the Delta hunt or anyone who has done it. I'm just not seeing the "Holy Delta/Lowly Kodiak" bison hunt arguement. Looks about the EXACT same to me! One you are hunting introduced animals on relatively flat land near a good road system with some habitation. The other you are hunting introduced animals on relatively hilly/mountainous land off the road system with limited habitation. Just a thought.

    Brett

  18. #18

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    Try stalking a Delta Bison with 10 of your buddies in tow! Not gonna happen! Kodiak... No problem.

    If you can't see the difference, then you just don't want to.

    The farmers in Delta DON'T want the Bison on their land! The Bison cost them lot's of money in lost crops. I shot mine on Public land, as do MANY of the successful hunters. Delta Bison are owned by the residents of Alaska, Kodiak Bison are owned by one individual!

    Farm Animals...

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    Does anyone know anything about the Copper River Bison? Any experience?

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Has anybody won it more than once?
    Dad won Delta in 1981, was first hunt I ever did. We got a nice bull. He drew again in 2008, this time Copper River herd.
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
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