Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 37

Thread: Back Up Sleeping Bag???

  1. #1
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default Back Up Sleeping Bag???

    Me and my Sheep hunting buddy had to get wayyyy too close after I shot my ram this year waiting for day light to hike back down. I had a bivy and he had an emergency blanket and we also had a tarp. Not enough, one of the most miserble nights of my life. Almost to the point of being dangerous. Was thinking of a small light weight bag to keep in my day pack at all times and to provide extra warmth at base camp if need be. Don't want to have to pack my primary bag every time we head up. Any one else carry a back up?? Any recomendations? Want something packable and light. Don't need to be toasty, just alive the next morning.

    Steve

  2. #2
    New member reuben_j_cogburn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    285

    Default Backup

    How about an Army poncho and liner. It would roll up very small and could be stashed most anyplace.
    If you haven't used one you simply lace the liner into the poncho and, by using the snaps on the poncho you make a light weight sdleeping bag.
    I went so far as to sew up one side half way (on the liner) so my feet won't slide out, and it keeps you a bit warmer.
    It probably won't keep you toasty but it would keep you alive.
    I Keep several around....

    reuben....

  3. #3
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default Poncho Liner

    I did use that same setup for 20 while in the army. With the new fancy light weight stuff on the market, I thought I might be able to improve. Seems like I was always chasing that thing around in my sleep, sewing one side would help for sure. Thanks for the idea.

    Steve

  4. #4

    Default emergency bag

    they also make an emergency sleeping bag. Made with the same material at your emergency blanket. A buddy of mine forgot his sleeping bag on a week long island camping fishing trip but lucky i had an emergency sleeping bag. A week is just too long to be that close to a buddy. It kinda reminded me of a burrito and it stunk after a week because it wouldnt let any air out. He said that he was almost to hot on nights that got down to mid 40s inside the tent.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    110

    Default Emergency sleeping bag

    Several years ago, I purchased a Marmot bag; it's goose down, rectangular, very light (vacuum packs to the size of a bread loaf), came with a zip-on ground sheet so two people (friends) could use it as a cover and the reason I liked the best: the bag covering is gore-tex. As an emergency bag, I've got a fair amount of faith in it (even though I never spent a night in the rain to see if it leaked or not) and still carry it in my overboard bag. Guess why I bought it? Spent the night laying on the rocks waiting for daylight during a sheep hunt! (Imagine that!) I know exactly what you're talking about when you say, "...one of the most miserable nights of my life." I just checked out Marmot's site and don't see that model anymore....

  6. #6
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default Thanks Mike

    After I shot my Ram and all the high fiving was done. We got it skinned and ready to pack down. We had walked up thru the alders and many steaming piles of blue berry bear jam. We both smelled like a sheep dinner and knew the smart thing was to stay put. Temps in the mid 30s and nonstop rain and 20 MPH winds. We stayed put untill we both stopped shivering, not a good sign. I fired up my MSR dragon fly. Thanks god for that stove, we took turns cat napping until day light then headed down. I will never be caught in that situation again no matter how much weight I have to carry and not use. Mother Alaska sure can teach you some valuable lessons if you survive to to remember them.

    Steve

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,416

    Default

    Ya, boy, we did the same thing last year. Shot a ram and ran out of daylght getting before getting back to the tent. Siwashed it on the side of the windy rainy mountain. I had an emergency space blanket and my pack cover is an extra large Outdoor research. Big enough to curl up inside of while laying on my pack. One cold fitfull night though. I was thankfull for the space blanket and pack cover but sure would have liked a little more insulation.

  8. #8
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default No Such thing as a quick hike!!

    I Hear ya SYD, I have been caught too many times only going for a quick hike and packing too light. I have started getting in shape now for my fall brown bear hunt. Almost bought the farm last spring on Hinchinbrook after my hunting partner did not tie the boat up good enough. Most of my gear was on the boat and it was dragging the anchor into deep water being pushed by gail force winds. That was a near death experience. One of those is enough. If I had that extra bag I may not have tried to swim to it 3 times. Cold water can sap more than your strengh, can make you stupid as well. Clearly was not thinking straight after being in 34 degree water for over 30 minutes. Leasons learned, tie the boat myself and cold water can kill you quick. All I could think of was getting to that boat and once I got to it my hands were useless and I was just able to climb in using the motor and trim tabs. At least I had good gear on board and was able to get warm and dry quickly. We were just going to walk around the shore looking for the cabin when we stopped a bear. An other lesson, THINGS ARE NOT AS CLOSE AS THEY APPEAR. Oh well, still kicking and much wiser. Won't be swimming in PWS in May anytime soon I hope anyway. I also figured out why that cabin was cabled down so well. The wind blow like a hurricane for over 22 hours.

    Steve

  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Big Agnes

    Big Agnes makes some 20 degree bags that weigh 2.3 lbs and compress to 6" X 7". You could stuff one of these into any day bag. The inflattable pad is about the size of a Nalgene bottle. Great insurance against the elements.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Eagle Enterprises on Intl Airport Road has these. I have a couple that I've vacuum packed for emergencies like the one originally described.

    http://www.ultimategear.com/therprotaid.html

  11. #11
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default Thanks Mr Pid

    That might be just the ticket. Could use them in the boat as well.

    Thanks Steve

  12. #12

    Default

    HAs anybody tried the old trick of a candle inside the spaceblanket (while sitting) to allow some warmth? It was in Alaska mag many years ago by a local guide. akraven

  13. #13
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The BEGINNING of the road!
    Posts
    1,137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akraven View Post
    HAs anybody tried the old trick of a candle inside the spaceblanket (while sitting) to allow some warmth? It was in Alaska mag many years ago by a local guide. akraven
    That's what my dad tought me to do. never did try it in a space blanket, but I imagine it would work well if you were able to situate yourself to form some sort of convection in your cacoon.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Eagle Enterprises on Intl Airport Road has these. I have a couple that I've vacuum packed for emergencies like the one originally described.

    http://www.ultimategear.com/therprotaid.html
    Man, that could be a life saver there. Or just make a night siwashed on the mtn a whole lot more tolerable. Thanks for the link.

  15. #15
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akraven View Post
    HAs anybody tried the old trick of a candle inside the spaceblanket (while sitting) to allow some warmth? It was in Alaska mag many years ago by a local guide. akraven
    I've never tried one in a space blanket but have used them carefully in a tent. I'ts amazing how much heat one candle will put out.

  16. #16
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default Yea Synd

    I think Mr Pid nailed it with that deal. Looks like it is pretty tough as well, plus I like being able to use your hands while in the bag. I'm going to try to find one in town if not I will have to have one shipped out.

    Steve

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    If I wanted to stay warm, I would have a close-cell sleeping pad to keep me off the ground, or you could also make a bed out of willow branches or grass.

    I prefer a large plastic bag it's warmer than a space blanket. If you wanted to go first class make your bag out of TyVek. I would also carry a painters ground tarp and string as a wind breaker.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    My bags are way, way tougher than space blankets. They have a rip-stop weave pattern in them and the zipper is more than adequate. After I vacuum packed them they're about the size of a folded pillow case and the vacuum bag makes the package ridgid. They slip into my pack very easily. I'd estimate the weight at around 8-12 ounces in the vacuum packege, but that's just an estimate.

    Alaska law requires a sleeping bag to be carried in an airplane's survival gear. That was the primary purpose for buying mine. The reason I take them on hunts is in case somebody get's hurt. An injured guy is going to need thermal protection. These bags are the real deal.
    Last edited by Mr. Pid; 02-28-2007 at 10:25.

  19. #19
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default Check your buddies gear!!!

    I had a bivy sack and an emergency blanket on this hunt, we had a tarp, however my buddy had none of the above. We were above the tree line so no anything but ROCKS. The moral of this story is your buddy's problem becomes yours. Do I stay zipped up nice and dry in my bivy that I have been humping all day while my buddy freezes to death or do I let him in and we both freeze. Well we both got in and were both miserable together. Ever seen the movie without a paddle? You get the idea. From now on I ask my buddy. Are you prepared to spend the night?? Because @$it happens on the mountain and you might not be back down to that high dollar tent and fart sack that you can see but is hours away. Never mind what would happen if one of you falls in a rockslide. Read the story about the father and son that were sheep hunting last year. Most sheep hunts are hours if not days away from help. I think that bag Mr Pid recommended is the deal for me. Plus it is only 40 bucks, after all I have spent that is coke money. We all tend to think we are bullet proof, well as I get older I realize that I'm not. I want to be around next year to get me a draw tag.

    Steve

  20. #20
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,416

    Default

    Ya, Mr. Pid. I was thinking the same thing about if you HAD to leave someone injured while you went for help that bag could save thier life.

    stid. If you find them around Fairbanks here let me know. I also emailed my hunting partner the link to the bag. Your'e right about your partner being just as prepared. It's imperative. Sounds like you guys were fortunate.

    Perry

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •