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Thread: .308 or 30.06 for a Mom?

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    Default .308 or 30.06 for a Mom?

    I was looking to buy a Moose/Caribou gun for my Mom. She is very new to hunting and I want to get her a caliber that doesn't kick too hard and is affordable also.

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    What is your mom's shooting experience? That will have more bearing on your caliber of choice than her hunting experience. There are quite a few calibers that could suit her needs, depending on what her level of shooting experience is. If she's never pulled a trigger, put some ear muffs on her head and get her comfortable and proficient with a .22 LR first. Then increase caliber until she can handle one capable of cleanly taking the game she seeks within her marksmanship capabilities.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

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    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    if your gonna be hunting game like moose and caribou, and wanna cut down on the kick....a .270 win should do nicely....



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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt&FishAK View Post
    if your gonna be hunting game like moose and caribou, and wanna cut down on the kick....a .270 win should do nicely....
    Ya beat me to it. .270 all the way. BTW, whata son, either way i'm sure you'll have one happy momma.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Well, I love the '.06, but I gotta third the .270.
    Load it down for her to get used to, then go with the 150 gr. for moose.

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    My wife has been around the horn a few times with rifles, and she objects to lots of extra weight more than boot. I tried her with an ultralight 06 though, and that was over the line for her. She suddenly didn't like the recoil in spite of liking to carry the gun. I tried her on a 308 and that was lots better in her mind out of the same weight of rifle, though in fact the recoil isn't reduced by much. Ultimately she settled on the 7x57 with handloads as her ultimate choice. At the time she made the choice though, the 7-08 hadn't seen the light of day. Since the ballistics are close to her handloads, I'm betting a nice lightweight 7-08 would suit her just as well. Plenty of power for moose and bou, light enough for easy carry, and not "too much" recoil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    My wife has been around the horn a few times with rifles, and she objects to lots of extra weight more than boot. I tried her with an ultralight 06 though, and that was over the line for her. She suddenly didn't like the recoil in spite of liking to carry the gun. I tried her on a 308 and that was lots better in her mind out of the same weight of rifle, though in fact the recoil isn't reduced by much. Ultimately she settled on the 7x57 with handloads as her ultimate choice. At the time she made the choice though, the 7-08 hadn't seen the light of day. Since the ballistics are close to her handloads, I'm betting a nice lightweight 7-08 would suit her just as well. Plenty of power for moose and bou, light enough for easy carry, and not "too much" recoil.
    It certainly carries more weight coming from you, BB, but I would reccommend a 7mm-08 too.

    "I" settled on a 7x57 for my wife, and she likes it. I also, have a 7x57. Two, actually. If I didn't, I'd go with a 7mm-08, in a minute.

    Either, cartridge, makes for plenty gun, light weight, and easy recoil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    It certainly carries more weight coming from you, BB, but I would reccommend a 7mm-08 too.

    "I" settled on a 7x57 for my wife, and she likes it. I also, have a 7x57. Two, actually. If I didn't, I'd go with a 7mm-08, in a minute.

    Either, cartridge, makes for plenty gun, light weight, and easy recoil.

    Smitty of the North
    i agree with your guys! this is a remington titanium m700 that weighs only about 6.25# trailside. i put in an excellent shilen trigger....it shoots pretty good for a lightweight. it is perfect with 140gr for most big game, but can chamber 175's if that is what is needed.
    recoil is very low, as is muzzleblast.
    happy trails.
    jh

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingslayer View Post
    I was looking to buy a Moose/Caribou gun for my Mom. She is very new to hunting and I want to get her a caliber that doesn't kick too hard and is affordable also.
    Is rifle cost a criterion? Is ammo cost a criterion? If it is only about weight and recoil, then read no further, but...

    Some calibers are going to be shot considerably less expensively than others. For instance, 30.06, .308, .270... you can find these rounds anywhere, even in a village, and you generally find them in various loads and cheaper than less common rounds. For some that is not a consideration, but for me it is. And imagine the sheer numbers of animals, from predators to big game, that have fallen to these common calibers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kingslayer View Post
    I was looking to buy a Moose/Caribou gun for my Mom. She is very new to hunting and I want to get her a caliber that doesn't kick too hard and is affordable also.
    You don't say whether you're a reloader Kingslayer, but if not, this might be the perfect opportunity and excuse to take it up.

    Whichever round and rifle you choose, your mom will take to the shooting lots faster if most of her early experience is with reduced velocity (along with reduced noise and recoil) loads. My wife shot nothing but reduced loads for practice in her first 5 years of hunting. I just snuck her rifle out and resighted it with heavier hunting loads right before the season, and when she shot game with it she didn't even notice the swap. Her favorite practice load in the 7x57 is a 120 grain bullet at around 2,000 fps. Still a little loud and still a little boot, but not painful at all. So she has lots of fun with it and shoots it a lot.

    And that's the point. Your mom will take to hunting and shooting better and faster if the practice is fun. And with reloading, the ammo is enough cheaper that she can shoot more. Bonus points all around.

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    .308 or 7mm/08 ABSOLUTELY - there are a few more considerations other than recoil and a short action cures some of them - today's bullet selection has changed our "world" as far as caliber choices and what to expect for performance - If budget constraints are part of your equation then a T-3 Tikka is one to look seriously at (buy at least one extra clip though, and keep it in the bottom of your daypack) and whatever rifle you settle on, put a Limbsaver recoil pad on it out of the box - As stated, shoot, shoot, shoot with a .22, it builds confidence and expertise

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    This is my standard reply for consideration of a rifle for a lady or young person...

    Rifle fit is the most important part of the equation, moreso the chambering or caliber. A LOP that's too long is just plain bad business. Too short is perhaps not as bad but unless your mom is an Amazonian Queen its unlikely any factory rifle will be too short out of the box.

    A rifle that doesn't fit right will just plain be uncomfortable to shoot. There are some good choices these days in ladies/youth models from the factory but just about any wood stocked rifle can be cut to fit for reasonable cost.

    In my experience- most of the common chamberings (30'06, 270, 7-08, 308, etc.) are all readily tolerated in a well fit rifle.

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    I bought my daughter a 7mm-08 and she loves it. I wouldn't hesitate to shoot a moose with it at an appropriate distance. It was a Model 700 youth and it fits my wife well too. Sportsman's Warehouse had them for $426 in Wasilla with a cheap 3x9 scope included. I bought the last one, but they may get more in?
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    I'm a believer in the .308. I have one sitting on the rack waiting for a son or daughter to come along and start shooting it. That being said, the .270 is a fantastic load for a small framed hunter. My hunting partner got his son (who weighed 60 lbs. soaking wet at the time) a .270 for his first big game gun. The main advantage I see to the .308 over the .270 is bullet weight options. Plus, you can't argue with the rounds history.

  15. #15

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    Here is a comparison of the two calibers;

    .308
    175 gr (11.3 g)----2,600 ft/s---2,627 ft·lb

    .270
    130 gr (8.4 g)----3,200 ft/s---2,955 ft·lb

    As you can see, the .270 uses lighter bullets, but actually has more energy. That is why it has less recoil, but still makes an excellent choice. You can load both with heavier bullets than those shown, but that is where the calibers shine for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tailwind View Post
    Here is a comparison of the two calibers;

    .308
    175 gr (11.3 g)----2,600 ft/s---2,627 ft·lb

    .270
    130 gr (8.4 g)----3,200 ft/s---2,955 ft·lb

    As you can see, the .270 uses lighter bullets, but actually has more energy. That is why it has less recoil, but still makes an excellent choice. You can load both with heavier bullets than those shown, but that is where the calibers shine for me.
    Muzzle energy only roughly corresponds with recoil energy, I'd suggest running the load figures on a recoil energy calculator wherein the weight of the actual rifle is taken into account.

    A large portion of the "pain" involved in recoil is in recoil velocity, not just the raw FPE, but I'll digress...in a properly fit rifle either will be tolerable to a wide variety of huntresses.

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    Ya, you could make her lug around a 10 pound .308 if you wanted...
    My guess is she would like a nice light field rifle for these long walks onto caribou. I may be wrong.

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    Member 2dawgs's Avatar
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    While I'm not a expert in any sense, have you thought about a semi auto loader? They usually have much less felt recoil, say in .308.

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    With the powder and bullets used by the factories in today's loads the .308 is better then the 30-06 was when it built it's reputation before and after the big world war. If I was mostly shooting 180 grain and heavier bullets I would go for the 30-06. If I was shooting the 150 to 165 grain bullets most of the time I would look at the .308. I really like my old Mod. 70 Featherweight 30-06. The rifle that launches the bullet is important and if weight and recoil is a serious consideration then something on a .308 or similar capacity case with a 6.5, 7mm or .308 caliber bullet should work fine for Alaska. The usual disclaimer being that there are better calibers for use on an irritated brown/grizzly in the brush.

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    I say it every time this subject comes up but the Ruger M77 compact in 308 is just a great little rifle for small framed shooters/hunters. My wife has no trouble putting a box or more of 150 grain coreLokt's through it at the range. The thing is super handy and when strapped to the rack on her quad it is so short that it doesn't really even hang over either side. Strapped to a pack it barely sticks up above the top so it lessens the pain of getting through the brush.

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